It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.
It's been a minute with Sam Sanders.
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It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

From NPR

A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

Most Recent Episodes

Olivia Bucks, left, helps her son Keith Bucks, center, and Ashton Morris, right, with class assignments in Beaverton, OR, on March 17, 2020. Craig Mitchelldyer/AP hide caption

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Craig Mitchelldyer/AP

No More School, No More Books: Coronavirus and Homeschooling

Right now a lot of parents have taken on a new responsibility: homeschool teacher. Many feel like they have no idea what they're doing. Sam talks with parents in all different kinds of circumstances trying to make it work.

No More School, No More Books: Coronavirus and Homeschooling

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A young girl rides her bike on empty city streets with no schools and a lack of tourists due to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Boston, Massachusetts on March 12, 2020. (Photo by Joseph Prezioso / AFP) JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOSEPH PREZIOSO/AFP via Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: The Coronavirus 'New Normal'

The last few weeks have meant adjusting to new ways of life. Sam talks to two NPR colleagues about how life in lockdown is affecting them personally. Morning Edition host David Greene tells Sam how his wife, a restaurateur, is coping with a struggling industry and whether a new congressional stimulus bill can offer relief. Then, Kelly McEvers, host of Embedded and the new Coronavirus Daily podcast, talks about the realities of homeschooling. Sam also speaks with Variety writer Meg Zukin, whose tweet asking couples to share their coronavirus "drama" went viral.

Weekly Wrap: The Coronavirus 'New Normal'

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Audie Cornish live in conversation with actress and comedian Jenny Slate in Washington D.C. Eslah Attar hide caption

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Eslah Attar

Audie Cornish on 'She's Funny' And The Rule Breakers of Comedy

Audie Cornish sits down with Sam Sanders to discuss her She's Funny series: conversations with female comedians Hannah Gadsby, Margaret Cho, Julia Louis-Dreyfus, Jenny Slate and others. In a series of vignettes, Audie and Sam discuss how these women charged forward in their careers and what risks they've taken through the years. Plus, Audie's extended conversation with comedian Jenny Slate on what the culture is really like at Saturday Night Live.

Audie Cornish on 'She's Funny' And The Rule Breakers of Comedy

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A commuter sits on a tram bench next to an LCD screen with an Australian Government directive regarding Coronavirus and social distancing. Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images hide caption

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Asanka Ratnayake/Getty Images

Special Episode: A Social Distancing Survival Guide

It's hard being isolated from jobs, friends and family. So Sam is changing up this week's show with guests who have ideas on how to cope with the quarantine. Superstar chef Samin Nosrat of Netflix's "Salt Fat Acid Heat" and Tucker Shaw of "America's Test Kitchen" talk about cooking for neighbors, helping laid-off restaurant workers, and making better meals out of the stuff you've got at hand. Comedian Iliza Schlesinger talks about what she's getting done during her time at home, and we hear from a Stanford psychologist about creating "distant socializing" to keep ourselves connected.

Special Episode: A Social Distancing Survival Guide

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Then Senator and presidential candidate Barack Obama delivers his speech 'A More Perfect Union,' in Philadelphia on March 18, 2008. Matt Rourke/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Matt Rourke/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Revisiting Obama's Historic 'Race Speech' 12 Years Later

Twelve years ago this week, presidential candidate Barack Obama gave what became a historic speech about race. He spoke in response to video that surfaced of his former pastor, Rev. Jeremiah Wright, heatedly criticizing America's foreign policy and treatment of African-Americans. In his speech, Obama urged racial harmony and understanding. Sam is joined by political commentators, activists and academics to see if the speech's message still holds up.

Revisiting Obama's Historic 'Race Speech' 12 Years Later

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Sea-Tac Airport, which serves the Seattle region, is mostly empty as the city deals with coronavirus. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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Karen Ducey/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Everything Is Canceled, Here Are Some Distractions

The coronavirus may force you to stay at home for the next few weeks, but here's how to successfully wait out a pandemic. Bob Mondello, film critic for NPR, tells Sam what movies to catch up on while self-quarantined, with some tips for film-watching etiquette. And with more people working from home, Barrie Hardymon, senior editor at Weekend Edition, recommends shows, movies and games both parents and kids can enjoy. Then, Sam talks to Edgar Ortiz, a student at Berea College in Kentucky. Like millions of American students, Ortiz is facing the closure of his campus and preparing to finish the semester online. Sam also talks to reporter Trish Murphy, host of podcast Seattle Now, about what it's like to see an empty Seattle ⁠— America's coronavirus epicenter.

Weekly Wrap: Everything Is Canceled, Here Are Some Distractions

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Something That May Shock and Discredit You by Daniel Mallory Ortberg. Atria Books hide caption

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Atria Books

Daniel Mallory Ortberg on 'Something That May Shock and Discredit You'

Daniel Mallory Ortberg is the writer behind Slate's Dear Prudence advice column. But now in his new book, Something That May Shock and Discredit You, Ortberg writes about something closer to home: his journey of transition from Mallory to Daniel. He talks to Sam about his relationship with religion, the power of self-knowledge and being able to fully own who you are.

Daniel Mallory Ortberg on 'Something That May Shock and Discredit You'

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Two shoppers in a Costco outside Seattle shop for supplies to prepare for a potential quarantine. The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im hide caption

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The Washington Post/The Washington Post via Getty Im

Weekly Wrap: Afghanistan Withdrawal, Coronavirus Fears

It's an all-NPR show! Sam talks with two fellow correspondents about big stories in the news this week. Stacey Vanek Smith, co-host of NPR's The Indicator from Planet Money, tells Sam about the "coronabump" — consumer goods and services that are seeing a spike in business because of the virus outbreak. And NPR's Quil Lawrence talks about the negotiated withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan after nearly 20 years at war. Then Sam talks to Shankar Vedantam, host of NPR's Hidden Brain, about how we can keep our fears of coronavirus in perspective.

Weekly Wrap: Afghanistan Withdrawal, Coronavirus Fears

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Pamela Adlon is the writer, director, star and co-creator of the comedy-drama Better Things on FX. Pamela Littky/FX hide caption

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Pamela Littky/FX

Pamela Adlon on 'Better Things'

Pamela Adlon is the writer, star, director and co-creator of Better Things on FX. The television comedy-drama follows Adlon's character, Sam, as a divorced actress, raising three kids in Los Angeles. In real life, Adlon is a divorced actress, raising three kids in Los Angeles. Sam talks to Adlon about her career, seeing your parents as real-life people, and the awful, crazy, beautiful experience of being a parent yourself.

Pamela Adlon on 'Better Things'

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Markets are reeling from an outbreak of coronavirus that has spread to more than 40 countries. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images hide caption

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Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Coronavirus and the Markets; 'Love Is Blind' is Final Boss Reality TV

The fast-moving coronavirus has turned up in more than 40 countries, and now it's affecting the global economy. Sam talks to two reporters from Marketplace about the financial impact of the virus. Marielle Segarra details how consumers might feel its consequences, while Reema Khrais, host of the podcast This Is Uncomfortable, explains how the US government is trying to respond. Then, Sam talks to Mark Cuevas, a contestant on the Netflix show Love Is Blind, about his time on the show. He follows up that conversation with Washington Post TV critic Hank Stuever, to break down the popularity of shows where contestants can't see each other.

Weekly Wrap: Coronavirus and the Markets; 'Love Is Blind' is Final Boss Reality TV

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