It's Been a Minute Each week, It's Been a Minute features people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with journalists in the know. Join us to make sense of the world through conversation.

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It's Been a Minute

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Each week, It's Been a Minute features people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with journalists in the know. Join us to make sense of the world through conversation.

If you can't get enough, try It's Been a Minute Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/itsbeenaminute

Most Recent Episodes

Author Julissa Arce makes the case for rejecting assimilation in her latest book, You Sound Like a White Girl. Aly Honore hide caption

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Aly Honore

For author Julissa Arce, 'sounding white' isn't a compliment

Julissa Arce used to think that the secret to fitting in was to "sound white" — to speak English perfectly, with no accent. And for years after her family came to the U.S. from Mexico, she did all the things immigrants are "supposed" to do to assimilate: she went to college, got a job at Goldman Sachs and became an American citizen.

For author Julissa Arce, 'sounding white' isn't a compliment

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Judy Greer playing Bree Marie Jensen in the new Hulu sitcom 'Reboot.' Michael Desmond/Hulu hide caption

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Michael Desmond/Hulu

Actor Judy Greer on 'Reboot' — and why are there so many TV reboots, anyway?

We talk TV REBOOTS. Guest host Elise Hu chats with Judy Greer about her role in the new Hulu series Reboot; her work as a comedic actress, and the state of television. Then, Elise talks with Daniel Herbert, associate professor of film and TV at the University of Michigan and co-editor of the book Film Reboots, about why so many old shows are being remade now. Plus, a special reboot-themed "Who Said That!" with Rob Pearlstein, co-executive producer and writer of the CBS MacGyver reboot (note: Rob is also Elise's partner) and his sister Joanna Pearlstein, opinion editor at The New York Times.

Actor Judy Greer on 'Reboot' — and why are there so many TV reboots, anyway?

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HBO set out to do what networks wouldn't (and couldn't) do. In the process, the company changed TV as we know it. Thiago Prudencio/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Thiago Prudencio/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

How HBO transformed television

HBO gave us some of the most iconic television shows of our time: Sex and the City. The Sopranos. Game of Thrones. But is the era of HBO coming to a close?

How HBO transformed television

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Britain's King Charles III outside Buckingham Palace in London. Daniel Leal/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Leal/AFP/Getty Images

Who needs the monarchy? Plus, why gray floors and barn doors are everywhere

King Charles III doesn't enjoy the same popularity as his mother. In the face of mixed feelings towards the new king, some are asking: Is this the beginning of the end of the British monarchy? Guest host Elise Hu talks to Dr. Shola Mos-Shogbamimu, lawyer, activist and author of This Is Why I Resist about this new era for the British royals, the power they hold and the potential opportunities for the new monarch.

Who needs the monarchy? Plus, why gray floors and barn doors are everywhere

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Girls' Generation performs onstage during the Tencent K-pop Live Music at WAPOP Hall in Seoul, South Korea on August 31, 2015. The Chosunilbo JNS/Multi-Bits/Getty Images hide caption

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The Chosunilbo JNS/Multi-Bits/Getty Images

How Girls' Generation shaped K-pop as we know it

To celebrate their 15th anniversary, the K-pop group Girls' Generation put out their newest album, 'Forever 1.' Today, we're taking a look back at their career and how they changed the standards for K-pop through music, choreography and beauty. Their impact doesn't stop at that — Girls' Generation's debut song is now being used to change the world, just not in the way they planned. Guest host Elise Hu discusses their legacy with music critic Tamar Herman and Korean film and culture scholar Michelle Cho.

How Girls' Generation shaped K-pop as we know it

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Serena Williams at the 2022 US Open on September 02, 2022 in New York City. Al Bello/Getty Images hide caption

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Al Bello/Getty Images

Serena's final serve; plus, the Emmys in an era of too much TV

Serena Williams just played her last U.S. Open. In the historic two-plus decades of her tennis career, she's won 23 Grand Slams and four Olympic gold medals — all while becoming a mother, dealing with injuries and health crises and facing more scrutiny and downright bias than her peers. Guest host Elise Hu talks to Alex Abad-Santos, senior correspondent at Vox, about her legacy in sports and beyond.

Serena's final serve; plus, the Emmys in an era of too much TV

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t.A.T.u. performs on stage at the 2003 MTV Movie Awards held at the Shrine Auditorium on May 31, 2003 in Los Angeles, California. Robert Mora/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Mora/Getty Images

The lesbian anthem was actually written by straight people

The Russian pop duo t.A.T.u released their smash single "All The Things She Said" 20 years ago this week. To this day, the bop is a queer staple, but should it be?

The lesbian anthem was actually written by straight people

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Close-up of Dungeons and Dragons game dice on table. Jared Hammonds/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Jared Hammonds/EyeEm/Getty Images

The game has changed for D&D and 'A League of Their Own'

For a long time, Dungeons & Dragons was stereotyped as a game for nerdy young white guys in their parents' basement. But not anymore — the game has exploded in popularity and players of all backgrounds are joining in. Guest co-host Andrea Gutierrez talks to Jasmine Bhullar and Persephone Valentine, both content creators and dungeon masters, about how D&D has become an exciting medium for marginalized people to tell new kinds of fantasy stories.

The game has changed for D&D and 'A League of Their Own'

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Celebrities in the front row of London Fashion Week. Victor Virgile/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images hide caption

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Victor Virgile/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

From cupcakes to private jets, how the quest for status drives culture

What is culture, where does it come from and why does it change? W. David Marx, author of the new book Status and Culture: How Our Desire for Social Rank Creates Taste, Identity, Art, Fashion, and Constant Change, says the answers come from our desire for prestige. Marx tells guest host Elise Hu how status has historically worked to drive trends like gourmet cupcakes or dark wash jeans, how the internet can lead to cultural stagnation, and ways we can redefine status to build a more equitable society.

From cupcakes to private jets, how the quest for status drives culture

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The BeReal app is blowing up - but does it give users what they want from social media? Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Will BeReal just make us BeFake? Plus, A Guidebook To Smell

BeReal may be the hottest new social media app on the market, but can it live up to its promise to be a more authentic alternative to other platforms? Guest co-host Elise Hu talks with writers Haley Nahman and Ryan Broderick about how BeReal signifies a shift in what we want from our apps and why social media always barrels towards its worst self. They also flex their pop culture knowledge in a game of Who Said That.

Will BeReal just make us BeFake? Plus, A Guidebook To Smell

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