It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.
It's been a minute with Sam Sanders.
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It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

From NPR

A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

Most Recent Episodes

Markets are reeling from an outbreak of coronavirus that has spread to more than 40 countries. Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images hide caption

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Tomohiro Ohsumi/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Coronavirus and the Markets; 'Love Is Blind' is Final Boss Reality TV

The fast-moving coronavirus has turned up in more than 40 countries, and now it's affecting the global economy. Sam talks to two reporters from Marketplace about the financial impact of the virus. Marielle Segarra details how consumers might feel its consequences, while Reema Khrais, host of the podcast This Is Uncomfortable, explains how the US government is trying to respond. Then, Sam talks to Mark Cuevas, a contestant on the Netflix show Love Is Blind, about his time on the show. He follows up that conversation with Washington Post TV critic Hank Stuever, to break down the popularity of shows where contestants can't see each other.

Weekly Wrap: Coronavirus and the Markets; 'Love Is Blind' is Final Boss Reality TV

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Nick Kroll in the 2020 film Olympic Dreams. Kroll is also the creator and star of the animated show Big Mouth. IFC Films hide caption

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IFC Films

Nick Kroll on 'Olympic Dreams' And 'Big Mouth'

Nick Kroll is the co-creator of the raunchy animated Netflix hit Big Mouth. The show (and Kroll) are known for over the top, strange, yet totally relatable comedy. Now, Kroll is out with a new film in which he plays a romantic lead for the first time. Olympic Dreams was filmed at the 2018 Olympics in South Korea. He tells Sam about making the movie and how it has a lot in common with Big Mouth.

Nick Kroll on 'Olympic Dreams' And 'Big Mouth'

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Elizabeth Warren attacked Michael Bloomberg on the debate stage Wednesday night. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: The Rise of Bloomberg, Revisiting Oakland

Billionaire Michael Bloomberg has been rising in the polls. He's spent more than $450 million on ads, but faced a big challenge Wednesday in his first presidential debate. This week, Sam talks to two journalists who have covered Bloomberg for years. Rosie Gray, a reporter for Buzzfeed News, says that his lackluster debate performance shows that there is a limit to the power of money on the campaign trail. Matt Flegenheimer, a national political reporter for The New York Times, details how Bloomberg is using his wealth to run a very different campaign than his competitors. Then, Sam revisits his reporting from Oakland last year on the realities of young people living with gun violence every day.

Weekly Wrap: The Rise of Bloomberg, Revisiting Oakland

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R. Eric Thomas' new book is Here for It: Or, How to Save Your Soul in America. Katie Simbala hide caption

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Katie Simbala

R. Eric Thomas on 'Here for It: Or, How to Save Your Soul in America'

R. Eric Thomas writes a column that is part news, part culture and part celebrity shade for Elle.com. But in his new book, "Here for It: Or, How to Save Your Soul in America," Thomas takes a look at his own life. He talks to Sam about his love of words, growing up as a gay black teenager and finding love in an unexpected place. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org.

R. Eric Thomas on 'Here for It: Or, How to Save Your Soul in America'

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An election ballot in Los Angeles County back in 2008. A new voting system would create a hybrid between paper and electronic ballots. Barbara Davidson/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Barbara Davidson/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Elections Are Too Modern, Evidently So Are Federal Buildings

The nation's first caucus and primary are in the rear-view mirror, and states around the country are second-guessing their election systems after the app used in the Iowa Caucus failed. Miles Parks, a reporter on NPR's Washington Desk, talks about how the state of Nevada is learning lessons from Iowa, including keeping the process slow so that results are certain. Libby Denkmann, senior politics reporter at member station KPCC, discusses how Los Angeles County is creating its own voting system — a hybrid of paper and electronic systems. Then, Sam talks with writer and architecture critic Kate Wagner about why a proposed rule from the Trump administration that would mandate "classical style" for new federal buildings is angering the design world.

Weekly Wrap: Elections Are Too Modern, Evidently So Are Federal Buildings

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Charlie Harding and Nate Sloan host the podcast Switched On Pop and are co-authors of the book Switched On Pop: How Popular Music Works, and Why it Matters. Ellyn Jameson/Switched On Pop hide caption

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Ellyn Jameson/Switched On Pop

What Makes A Hit Pop Song

Listen up music composition nerds and music lovers! In this episode Sam is joined by Nate Sloan and Charlie Harding, co-hosts of the podcast Switched On Pop. They break down what makes a song: why certain pop songs become ear worms and what their form and structure mean for the future of music. Answers to those questions and more that will leave you singing along. Sloan and Harding's recent book is called Switched On Pop: How Popular Music Works and Why It Matters.

What Makes A Hit Pop Song

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Bong Joon-ho stands among his fellow nominees for the Oscar for Best International Feature Film. He may be a big winner at the Oscars for his film "Parasite." Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images hide caption

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Rodin Eckenroth/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Oscars Still So White. So Is New Hampshire's Primary

The Oscars are Sunday and once again this year's nominees reflect an Academy that's still older, whiter, and more male. All five directing nominees are men, and 19 of 20 nominees for acting are white.

Roy Wood Jr. is a stand-up comedian and a correspondent for The Daily Show with Trevor Noah. JC Olivera/Getty Images hide caption

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JC Olivera/Getty Images

Roy Wood Jr. on Comedy, Criminal Justice, and Chicken Sandwiches

Roy Wood Jr. has been a comedian since he was 19. He's a correspondent for 'The Daily Show with Trevor Noah' and has two Comedy Central specials under his belt. Wood talks to Sam about his career, how to be funny in a changing political climate, and a project he's working on that was inspired by a run-in with the law. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org.

Roy Wood Jr. on Comedy, Criminal Justice, and Chicken Sandwiches

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Kobe Bryant died this past weekend. There was an outpouring of grief from fans, but also solemn reminders of his 2003 sexual assault case. Allen Berezovsky/Getty Images hide caption

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Allen Berezovsky/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Coronavirus and Racism, Australia Fires, Kobe Bryant's Legacy

It's been a busy week in news. Australia's capital Canberra is menaced by wildfires and has declared a state of emergency. And the fast spread of the coronavirus has also led to racist comments and press coverage about Asian food and Asian-American eating habits. Sam talks about these stories with panelists Julie Cart, a reporter for CalMatters and Andrew Ti, host of the podcast Yo, Is This Racist? and writer for the ABC series Mixed-ish. Then sports writer Jemele Hill of the Atlantic reflects on basketball legend Kobe Bryant, who was killed along with his daughter and seven others in a helicopter crash this past week. Sam asks how and when we should acknowledge the good and bad sides of someone's life after a sudden death.

Weekly Wrap: Coronavirus and Racism, Australia Fires, Kobe Bryant's Legacy

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Prince at the burned-out building he and Randee St. Nicholas found in the mid-1990s in Hollywood. Randee St. Nicholas/My Name Is Prince hide caption

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Randee St. Nicholas/My Name Is Prince

The Iconic Moments of Prince

Randee St. Nicholas met Prince for the first time in 1991, when she was hired to do their first shoot together. From there she captured some of his highest moments doing sold out shows across the world, to his most vulnerable, in hotel rooms late at night. Randee recalls her memorable relationship with Prince that spanned years and led to countless memories. She's published her photos of the iconic singer in a new book called My Name Is Prince.

The Iconic Moments of Prince

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