It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders Sometimes you just need to talk it out—and that's exactly what host Sam Sanders does each week. Join him on Fridays for a recap of the week's news, culture and everything – plus Tuesday deep dives with artists, writers, journalists and more.
It's been a minute with Sam Sanders.
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It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

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Sometimes you just need to talk it out—and that's exactly what host Sam Sanders does each week. Join him on Fridays for a recap of the week's news, culture and everything – plus Tuesday deep dives with artists, writers, journalists and more.

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A fire-damaged Pacific Coast sign remains standing along the Pacific Coast Highway amid the blackened and charred hills from the Woolsey Fire in Malibu, California on November 15, 2018. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: California Fires, Drunk Raccoons, Beto Running

It"s Friday. Guest host Elise Hu tries to work this whole news things out with Los Angeles Times health reporter Soumya Karlamangla and Snapchat's Good Luck America host, Peter Hamby. Soumya talks twin tragedies in her hometown of Thousand Oaks, Peter questions CNN's election night re-do, and Elise finds no great deception in this week's North Korea news.

Weekly Wrap: California Fires, Drunk Raccoons, Beto Running

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Yoo Ah-In, Jeong Jong-seo and Steven Yeun star in Burning, a psychological thriller set in Seoul and Paju, South Korea. CGV Arthouse hide caption

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CGV Arthouse

Steven Yeun, A Star On Both Sides Of The Pacific, Talks Toggling Between East & West

It's Tuesday. Elise Hu steps in the hosting chair for Sam and gets deep with Yeun on why he's sick of talking about Asian identity, his time as Glenn Rhee on The Walking Dead, and his new South Korean thriller. Send thoughts about the episode to Elise at ehu@npr.org or tweet her @elisewho.

Steven Yeun, A Star On Both Sides Of The Pacific, Talks Toggling Between East & West

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Amazon is reportedly expanding its headquarters to Crystal City, Va. INA FASSBENDER/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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INA FASSBENDER/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Democrats' Victory or Defeat, Amazon HQ2, Alien Spaceship

It's Friday. Sam is getting in the zone with Linda Holmes and Glen Weldon of NPR's podcast "Pop Culture Happy Hour." This week, Sam is asking whether Democrats really won or lost in the midterms, and Linda and Glen are wondering if we should care about a so-called alien spacecraft and Alec Baldwin. Also Sam is digging into what Amazon's reported expansion to Crystal City, Va., might mean for people living there.

Weekly Wrap: Democrats' Victory or Defeat, Amazon HQ2, Alien Spaceship

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Abbi Jacobson speaks onstage during Netflix TCA 2018 at The Beverly Hilton Hotel. Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Netflix hide caption

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Matt Winkelmeyer/Getty Images for Netflix

Heartbreak Led 'Broad City' Co-Star Abbi Jacobson On A Cross-Country Road Trip

It's Tuesday. 'Broad City' co-star Abbi Jacobson's new book, 'I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff,' chronicles her cross-country road trip following a devastating breakup. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

Heartbreak Led 'Broad City' Co-Star Abbi Jacobson On A Cross-Country Road Trip

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People gather for an interfaith candlelight vigil a few blocks away from the site of a mass shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Processing Pittsburgh, Race And Politics, Cardi Vs. Nicki

It's Friday. Sam is clapping along because he's happy to be in the studio with NPR "Morning Edition" host David Greene and journalist Audrey Cleo Yap. The 2018 midterm elections are just days away, and David shares some insights from conversations he's had with voters. Sam explains why race is the primary subtext of all U.S. politics right now. After the mass shooting at a synagogue in Pittsburgh, Sam chats with a man whose father was killed in a massacre at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin six years ago.

Weekly Wrap: Processing Pittsburgh, Race And Politics, Cardi Vs. Nicki

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Donna Summer at a Los Angeles, Calif., shoot for SOUL Newspaper in 1977. Bruce W. Talamon/TASCHEN hide caption

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Bruce W. Talamon/TASCHEN

Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder: Through the Lens

It's Tuesday: Sam talks with photographer Bruce Talamon on capturing famous black musicians in their most intimate moments from their living rooms to the stage. His photos are out in a new book: Bruce W. Talamon. Soul. R&B. Funk. Photographs 1972-1982.

Aretha Franklin, Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder: Through the Lens

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People gather at a rally for LGBTQ rights at Washington Square Park on Oct. 21, 2018 in New York City. Yana Paskova/Getty Images hide caption

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Yana Paskova/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Transgender Rights, Netflix Rom-Coms, Halloween Candy

It's Friday. Sam's loneliness is killing him, so he's joined by podcast maker and journalist Julia Furlan and Stacey Vanek Smith, host of NPR's The Indicator podcast. The Trump administration may seek to limit the federal government's definition of "sex" — potentially allowing for the rollback of protections for transgender people under federal civil rights law. Plus, Sam looks at the success of Netflix's "Summer of Love" and wonders if it could revive the romantic-comedy genre in film.

Weekly Wrap: Transgender Rights, Netflix Rom-Coms, Halloween Candy

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Attendees cheer a speaker during the Women's March "Power to the Polls" voter registration tour launch at Sam Boyd Stadium on January 21, 2018, in Las Vegas, Nevada, as demonstrators across the nation gathered to protest President Donald Trump's administration and to raise awareness for women's issues. Sam Morris/Getty Images hide caption

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Sam Morris/Getty Images

2018: The "Year Of The Woman?"

Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Elizabeth Heng talk to Sam about running as women in 2018, and NPR political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben (@titonka) explains why even 2018's record number of female candidates won't mean parity.

2018: The "Year Of The Woman?"

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Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was last seen visiting Saudi Arabia's consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2. MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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MOHAMMED AL-SHAIKH/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Jamal Khashoggi, Research Hoax, & Nebraska's New Slogan

Sam is joined by NPR's Kelly McEvers, host of Embedded, and Code Switch correspondent Karen Grigsby Bates. Questions continue to mount after the disappearance of journalist Jamal Khashoggi in Istanbul. Plus, Sam digs into an elaborate hoax designed to discredit research in so-called "grievance studies" — what the hoaxsters call academic fields focused on identity. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

Weekly Wrap: Jamal Khashoggi, Research Hoax, & Nebraska's New Slogan

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Cindy Shank and Rudy Valdez attend The Sentence premiere at The Ray during the 2018 Sundance Film Festival on January 20, 2018 in Park City, Utah. Tibrina Hobson/Getty Images hide caption

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Tibrina Hobson/Getty Images

'The Sentence' Documents Toll of Mandatory Sentencing Laws On A Family

It's Tuesday: Cindy Shank was living a comfortable life at home with her three little girls and husband when one day the feds came knocking. They were there to arrest her for not telling the police about an ex-boyfriend's drug dealing several years prior. That's the story behind a new HBO documentary, 'The Sentence' - directed by Shank's brother, Rudy Valdez. Sam talks to Cindy and Rudy about documenting the impact on their family, a mother's love for her children, and how the film has brought politicians together on both sides of the aisle.

'The Sentence' Documents Toll of Mandatory Sentencing Laws On A Family

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