Speed skater Bridie Farrell testifies before a Congressional committee on Capitol Hill regarding protecting Olympic athletes who have been sexual abused. Farrell was in Washington, D.C., on April 18, 2018. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP

Interview: #MeToo Hits Elite Sports

It's Tuesday: Sam talks to speed skater Bridie Farrell. Her mentor, former Olympian Andy Gabel, sexually abused her when she was a teenager. Sam also talks to journalist Alexandra Starr about the unique ways elite sports can groom children to be victims of abuse.

Interview: #MeToo Hits Elite Sports

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A woman holds a placard in Spanish that translates to "genocide," in front of hundreds of shoes that were displayed in memory of those killed by Hurricane Maria. She stands in front of the Puerto Rican Capitol in San Juan, on June 1, 2018. Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ricardo Arduengo/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "Onto the List."

It's Friday: Sam is chatting this week with NPR Morning Edition editor Ashley Brown (@hey_hashbrown) and NPR political reporter Danielle Kurtzleben (@titonka). They're talking about the record number of women running ahead of the midterms and how that has Dems particularly excited for November, President Trump's denial about the death toll in Puerto Rico following Hurricane Maria, and the police officer who shot and killed Botham Jean in his own home. To top it off, a chat about how we're all focused on Washington when our local politics is what counts. Buy tickets to our next Los Angeles live show at kp.cc/IBAM.

Weekly Wrap: "Onto the List."

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Director Lauren Miller Rogen on the set of her new Netflix film, 'Like Father.' Linda Kallerus/Netflix hide caption

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Linda Kallerus/Netflix

Director Lauren Miller Rogen's 'Like Father' Reflects Her Own Emotional Journey

It's Tuesday: writer and director Lauren Miller Rogen talks to Sam about her new Netflix film, "Like Father," starring Kristen Bell and Kelsey Grammer, caring for a parent with Alzheimer's disease, and working with her husband, Seth Rogen.

Director Lauren Miller Rogen's 'Like Father' Reflects Her Own Emotional Journey

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A billboard featuring former San Francisco 49ers quaterback Colin Kaepernick is displayed on the roof of the Nike Store in San Francisco, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "Just Do It."

It's Friday: Sam is dreaming about the news with NPR tech reporter Jasmine Garsd (@JasGarsd) and reporter and public radio host Lizzie O'Leary (@lizzieohreally) . They're discussing the Brett Kavanaugh hearings, the anonymous New York Times op-ed and teens using social media. Plus a chat about Nike's new Colin Kaepernick ad and what it says about corporations and "wokeness." Buy tickets to our next Los Angeles live show at kp.cc/IBAM.

Weekly Wrap: "Just Do It."

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President Donald Trump talks to reporters as he departs the White House June 8, 2018 in Washington, DC. Trump is traveling to Canada to attend the G7 summit before heading to Singapore on Saturday for a planned U.S.- North Korea summit. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Covering The Trump White House

It's Tuesday: two White House reporters join Sam to talk about life behind the scenes covering the Trump administration: Katie Rogers of the New York Times (@katierogers) and Geoff Bennett of NBC News (@GeoffRBennett). Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org. Tickets to our October 2 live show in LA are at kp.cc/IBAM.

Covering The Trump White House

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Emmy Nominees Rachel Brosnahan & Brian Tyree Henry

It's Friday: Sam's taking a break from the news and revisiting two conversations from this year. First up, Brian Tyree Henry, who plays Afred "Paperboi" Miles on the hit FX show 'Atlanta.' He's up for outstanding guest actor in a comedy series at next month's 2018 Emmy Awards. Also nominated — for her starring role in 'The Marvelous Mrs Maisel' — is Rachel Brosnahan, up for outstanding lead actress in a comedy series. Back to our regular schedule next week. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org. Tickets to our October 2 live show in LA are at kp.cc/IBAM.

Emmy Nominees Rachel Brosnahan & Brian Tyree Henry

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Syd performs at Camp Flog Gnaw Carnival 2017 in Los Angeles, California. Kevin Winter/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Winter/Getty Images

Syd Isn't Rushing Her Moment

It's Tuesday: Sam talks to Syd, a breakout star of the hip-hop collective Odd Future, about her new band, The Internet, and about being free to bring herself to the music. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org. Tickets to our October 2 live show in LA are at kp.cc/IBAM.

Syd Isn't Rushing Her Moment

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Michael Cohen, center, leaves Federal court, Tuesday, Aug. 21, 2018, in New York. Cohen, has pleaded guilty to charges including campaign finance fraud stemming from hush money payments to porn actress Stormy Daniels and ex-Playboy model Karen McDougal. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

Weekly Wrap: "Lying In Wait."

It's Friday: Sam's feeling like a rockstar with New York Times reporter Caitlin Dickerson (@itscaitlinhd) and host of 'The News' from BuzzFeed, Julia Furlan (@juliastmi). They're discussing Michael Cohen, family separation, and another #MeToo story, but one with the usual gender roles reversed, plus a call to a Catholic mother processing the recent report of sexual abuse and cover ups in the church. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

Weekly Wrap: "Lying In Wait."

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Kari Skogland is the only woman nominated for Outstanding Directing for a Drama Series at next month's Emmy Awards. David Leyes hide caption

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David Leyes

'Handmaid's Tale' Director Kari Skogland

It's Tuesday: Skogland is the only woman nominated for best directing (drama) at next month's Emmy Awards. She explains the care and craft behind directing such dark and intense material, and what Hollywood could do right now to increase the number of female directors. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

'Handmaid's Tale' Director Kari Skogland

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American musician Aretha Franklin performs on stage at the Park West Auditorium, Chicago, Illinois, March 23, 1992. Paul Natkin/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Natkin/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "This Or That."

It's Friday: Sam's in a material world with NPR correspondent Elise Hu (@elisewho) and Morning Edition host David Greene (@nprgreene). They're talking about North and South Korea, freedom of the press, Twitter, and the Queen of Soul. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

Weekly Wrap: "This Or That."

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As Searching star John Cho (right) looks on, director Aneesh Chaganty (center) snaps a photo of Sam Sanders, who responds in kind, at The Line Hotel in Los Angeles on Monday, July 30. Johnny Pérez/NPR hide caption

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Johnny Pérez/NPR

John Cho And Aneesh Chaganty On 'Searching'

It's Tuesday: recorded live at The Line Hotel in LA, actor John Cho and director Aneesh Chaganty talk about their Sundance award-winning film, 'Searching,' the role of technology in our lives, and the responsibility and pressure of representation. Tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

John Cho And Aneesh Chaganty On 'Searching'

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Weekly Wrap: "We Are Done."

It's Friday: Sam is kicking it with Texas Public Radio reporter Joey Palacios (@Joeycules) and NPR political reporter Asma Khalid (@asmamk). They're talking immigration, social media, and talking to kids about race. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

Weekly Wrap: "We Are Done."

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"The Bold Type" showrunner Amanda Lasher (left) and Aisha Dee (right), who plays Kat, at the January 2018 "Freeform Summit" in Los Angeles, Calif. Image Group LA/Freeform hide caption

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Image Group LA/Freeform

'The Bold Type': Aisha Dee and Amanda Lasher

It's Tuesday: actress Aisha Dee and showrunner Amanda Lasher join Sam to talk about their Freeform show, 'The Bold Type.' The show follows three young women living and working in New York City — wide-eyed youth dealing with race, sex, and politics, without the tired tropes. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

'The Bold Type': Aisha Dee and Amanda Lasher

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Trump supporters displaying QAnon posters at a Trump rally on July 31, 2018 at the Florida State Fairgrounds in Tampa, Florida. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "#MeToo and Moonves."

It's Friday: Sam slows it down just a little this week with NPR Code Switch correspondent Karen Grigsby Bates (@karenbates) and NPR TV Critic Eric Deggans (@Deggans). They talk wildfires, Les Moonves, and QAnon. Tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

Weekly Wrap: "#MeToo and Moonves."

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D.L. Hughley Shannon McCollum hide caption

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Shannon McCollum

D.L. Hughley On 'How Not To Get Shot'

'And Other Advice From White People.' That's his new book. D.L. also talks to Sam about infidelity, losing his father, the MeToo movement, and comedy in the era of Netflix.

D.L. Hughley On 'How Not To Get Shot'

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R. Kelly recently came out with the song "I Admit," which addresses sexual assault allegations against him. R. Kelly performs here during the 2015 Soul Train Awards at the Orleans Arena on Nov. 6, 2015, in Las Vegas. Powers Imagery/Powers Imagery/Invision/AP hide caption

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Powers Imagery/Powers Imagery/Invision/AP

Weekly Wrap: "Pay Them Off."

It's Friday: Sam is young, scrappy, and hungry in our latest weekly wrap with NPR reporter Vanessa Romo (@vanromo) and Ira Madison (@ira), host of the podcast 'Keep It.' The three of them talk Cohen, crops, confessions and Comey. Get tickets to our Los Angeles live show with actor John Cho and director Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "Pay Them Off."

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Actress Uzo Aduba plays Suzanne 'Crazy Eyes' Warren on the Netflix series Orange is the New Black. Jordan Matter hide caption

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Jordan Matter

Uzo Aduba Says A Supernatural Message Kept Her In Acting

It's Tuesday: Aduba is best known for her role as Suzanne 'Crazy Eyes' Warren on Netflix's 'Orange is the New Black.' She talks to Sam about portraying mental illness on screen, having faith in your dreams, and the latest season of 'Orange.' Get tickets to our live show in LA with actor John Cho and director Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Uzo Aduba Says A Supernatural Message Kept Her In Acting

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Unionized Amazon workers in Spain protested outside of an Amazon warehouse there on July 18, 2018, in conjunction with Prime Day. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "They'll Be Fine."

It's Friday: NPR Political Reporter Ayesha Rascoe (@ayesharascoe) and Stephen Thompson (@idislikestephen) of NPR Music and Pop Culture Happy Hour tell Sam what he wants to know about the week's news. Helsinki. Amazon Prime Day. The Shiggy. Get tickets for our live show in LA on July 30 with John Cho and Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "They'll Be Fine."

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A lithograph of the flood through the Conemaugh Valley of Pennsylvania, which swept residents of Johnstown and their homes down a swollen river. Over 2,000 people died in the May 31, 1889 flood. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

Al Roker on 'Ruthless Tide'

It's Tuesday: longtime NBC weatherman Al Roker has a new book about the most catastrophic flood in US history — the Johnstown flood of 1889, which killed more than 2,200 people in the Pennsylvania steel town. Roker says the story of that flood contains lessons about climate change, greed, American infrastructure, and the power of mother nature. Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Al Roker on 'Ruthless Tide'

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President Trump at a NATO summit meeting with world leaders in Brussels, Belgium on July 11. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "New World Disorder."

It's Friday: Sam's shuffling through the street with NPR correspondents Ina Jaffe and Kirk Siegler this week. On the table: the President's travels and negotiations with NATO, Bett Kavanaugh, a call to a World Cup fan rooting for France, and a look at homelessness in Los Angeles and across the country. Get tickets for our live show in LA on July 30 with John Cho and Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "New World Disorder."

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Rainn Wilson and Patricia Arquette in Permanent Magnolia Pictures hide caption

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Magnolia Pictures

Rainn Wilson On 'Permanent' And Life Post-'Office'

It's Tuesday: Wilson's latest film, 'Permanent,' is about embracing the weirdness of your own family. He also opens up about religion, struggling as a young actor in New York and — of course — 'The Office.' Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Rainn Wilson On 'Permanent' And Life Post-'Office'

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Three-year-old Daisy, a Dachshund Terrier, is adorned with US flag colours awaiting a parade in San Gabriel, California on July 4, 2018. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "In The Balance."

It's Friday: NPR's Sarah McCammon hops in the stu' for Sam this fourth of July weekend with NPR Political Reporter Danielle Kurtzleben (@titonka) and Marketplace Senior Reporter Kimberly Adams (@KA_Marketplace). They also chat about Scott Pruitt, trade wars, and American identity. Get tickets for our live show in LA on July 30 with John Cho and Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "In The Balance."

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Actress Amber Tamblyn is the author of the new novel, Any Man. Katie Jacobs hide caption

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Katie Jacobs

Amber Tamblyn's New Novel Challenges Assumptions About Sexual Assault

It's Tuesday: Actress Amber Tamblyn grew up in Los Angeles and is known for roles in Joan of Arcadia and the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. Now, she's out with a new novel called Any Man, about a female serial rapist who targets men. She talks to Sam about the novel, her relationship with husband David Cross, and her work with the MeToo and Time's Up movements. Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Amber Tamblyn's New Novel Challenges Assumptions About Sexual Assault

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Progressive challenger Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez celebrates with supporters at a victory party in the Bronx on June 26, 2018 after upsetting incumbent Democratic Representative Joseph Crowly in New York City. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Heins/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "Who Are We?"

It's Friday: Sam is up on his feet this week with sports and entertainment journalist Audrey Cleo Yap (@audreycleo) and INTO Editor-In-Chief Zach Stafford (@ZachStafford). They talk about Anthony Kennedy, Chaka Khan, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the US Census. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "Who Are We?"

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