Unionized Amazon workers in Spain protested outside of an Amazon warehouse there on July 18, 2018, in conjunction with Prime Day. SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "They'll Be Fine."

It's Friday: NPR Political Reporter Ayesha Rascoe (@ayesharascoe) and Stephen Thompson (@idislikestephen) of NPR Music and Pop Culture Happy Hour tell Sam what he wants to know about the week's news. Helsinki. Amazon Prime Day. The Shiggy. Get tickets for our live show in LA on July 30 with John Cho and Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "They'll Be Fine."

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A lithograph of the flood through the Conemaugh Valley of Pennsylvania, which swept residents of Johnstown and their homes down a swollen river. Over 2,000 people died in the May 31, 1889 flood. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

Al Roker on 'Ruthless Tide'

It's Tuesday: longtime NBC weatherman Al Roker has a new book about the most catastrophic flood in US history — the Johnstown flood of 1889, which killed more than 2,200 people in the Pennsylvania steel town. Roker says the story of that flood contains lessons about climate change, greed, American infrastructure, and the power of mother nature. Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Al Roker on 'Ruthless Tide'

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President Trump at a NATO summit meeting with world leaders in Brussels, Belgium on July 11. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Weekly Wrap: "New World Disorder."

It's Friday: Sam's shuffling through the street with NPR correspondents Ina Jaffe and Kirk Siegler this week. On the table: the President's travels and negotiations with NATO, Bett Kavanaugh, a call to a World Cup fan rooting for France, and a look at homelessness in Los Angeles and across the country. Get tickets for our live show in LA on July 30 with John Cho and Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "New World Disorder."

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Rainn Wilson and Patricia Arquette in Permanent Magnolia Pictures hide caption

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Magnolia Pictures

Rainn Wilson On 'Permanent' And Life Post-'Office'

It's Tuesday: Wilson's latest film, 'Permanent,' is about embracing the weirdness of your own family. He also opens up about religion, struggling as a young actor in New York and — of course — 'The Office.' Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Rainn Wilson On 'Permanent' And Life Post-'Office'

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Three-year-old Daisy, a Dachshund Terrier, is adorned with US flag colours awaiting a parade in San Gabriel, California on July 4, 2018. FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "In The Balance."

It's Friday: NPR's Sarah McCammon hops in the stu' for Sam this fourth of July weekend with NPR Political Reporter Danielle Kurtzleben (@titonka) and Marketplace Senior Reporter Kimberly Adams (@KA_Marketplace). They also chat about Scott Pruitt, trade wars, and American identity. Get tickets for our live show in LA on July 30 with John Cho and Aneesh Chaganty at nprpresents.org.

Weekly Wrap: "In The Balance."

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Actress Amber Tamblyn is the author of the new novel, Any Man. Katie Jacobs hide caption

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Katie Jacobs

Amber Tamblyn's New Novel Challenges Assumptions About Sexual Assault

It's Tuesday: Actress Amber Tamblyn grew up in Los Angeles and is known for roles in Joan of Arcadia and the Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants. Now, she's out with a new novel called Any Man, about a female serial rapist who targets men. She talks to Sam about the novel, her relationship with husband David Cross, and her work with the MeToo and Time's Up movements. Email samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Amber Tamblyn's New Novel Challenges Assumptions About Sexual Assault

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Progressive challenger Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez celebrates with supporters at a victory party in the Bronx on June 26, 2018 after upsetting incumbent Democratic Representative Joseph Crowly in New York City. Scott Heins/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Heins/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "Who Are We?"

It's Friday: Sam is up on his feet this week with sports and entertainment journalist Audrey Cleo Yap (@audreycleo) and INTO Editor-In-Chief Zach Stafford (@ZachStafford). They talk about Anthony Kennedy, Chaka Khan, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and the US Census. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "Who Are We?"

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Actor Joe Morton plays Eli Pope in the ABC drama Scandal. He's also performing the title role in the Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles production of Henry IV. Bob D'Amico/ABC hide caption

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Bob D'Amico/ABC

Joe Morton, From Stage To Screen And Back Again

It's Tuesday: Joe Morton is now starring in the title role of the Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles production of Henry IV, and is known for his Emmy-award winning role as Eli Pope in Scandal. He talks to Sam about dropping out of college after being told his race would "color" a production, and making it in theater, film, and television. Tickets and information on Henry IV at shakespearecenter.org.

Joe Morton, From Stage To Screen And Back Again

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The Franciscan Action Network, Faith in Action and the DMV Congregation Network holds a prayer vigil and protest over the Trump administration's immigration policies with children wrapped in survival blankets at the US Capitol on June 21, 2018 in Washington DC. NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NICHOLAS KAMM/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "Game Of Chicken."

Sam can't believe we made it this week with Haley Byrd (@byrdinator), congressional reporter for The Weekly Standard, and Lissandra Villa (@LissandraVilla), political reporter for BuzzFeed News. They talk through the most dominant story of the week: immigration. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "Game Of Chicken."

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Niecy Nash as Desna Simms in Claws. Skip Bolen/TNT hide caption

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Skip Bolen/TNT

Niecy Nash, Living A Dream: To Be 'Black, Fabulous, And On TV'

Best known for comedic roles in Reno 911, The Mindy Project, and HBO's Getting On, Niecy Nash stars in the TNT show Claws, a female-driven crime drama in its second season that one critic described as "Breaking Bad meets Steel Magnolias." She tells Sam how she used comedy to overcome tragedy in her personal life, and bringing a black, female anti-hero to TV. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Niecy Nash, Living A Dream: To Be 'Black, Fabulous, And On TV'

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Positivo by J Balvin and Michael Brun is the official song of the 2018 FIFA World Cup. In this photo, Ramin Rezaeian of Iran battles with Amine Harit of Morocco during the Russia group B match on June 15, 2018 in Saint Petersburg, Russia. Stanley Chou/Getty Images hide caption

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Stanley Chou/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "It Is Written."

Sam esta bailando with Pop Culture Happy Hour host Linda Holmes (@lindaholmes) and NPR Politics Podcast host and congressional correspondent Scott Detrow (@scottdetrow). Catch up on the week's news: the World Cup, Trump administration immigration policy, and diversity in film criticism. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "It Is Written."

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Mishel Prada and Melissa Barrera star in the STARZ show Vida. They spoke with Sam Sanders at NPR West in Culver City, CA, in June 2018. Anjuli Sastry/NPR hide caption

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Anjuli Sastry/NPR

Racism, Gentrification, And Sexual Fluidity At Forefront On 'Vida'

Sam chats with the two leads of the STARZ show 'Vida,' Melissa Barrera and Mishel Prada. They play two sisters who return home to their old east Los Angeles neighborhood after their mother's death. There, they have to grapple with family drama, gentrification, racism, and finding their identity. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenaMin with feels.

Racism, Gentrification, And Sexual Fluidity At Forefront On 'Vida'

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Philadelphia Eagles football player Malcolm Jenkins speaks to the media during Super Bowl LII in January 2018, in Minnesota. President Trump dis-invited Jenkins and his team to the White House this week. Jenkins responded with a silent gesture during an interview with reporters, using signs to deliver messages about social justice. Hannah Foslien/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Foslien/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: "Look Over There."

We gon' be alright with Sam and these two guests this week: Morning Edition and Up First host Steve Inskeep and CNN Politics Senior Writer Juana Summers. The real Puerto Rico death toll, insulin prices, and baked beans, plus trade talk with Soumaya Keynes of The Economist. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "Look Over There."

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Students gather in response to the election of Donald Trump at the University of California Los Angeles on November 10, 2016. College campuses have become a focal point in the free speech debate. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Free Speech vs. Hate Speech

Roseanne's tweet. NFL players kneeling. The President blocking people on Twitter. These stories are all about the same thing: what is free speech? Who gets to decide? And what happens when one person's speech makes another person feel unsafe? Sam talks to Nadine Strossen, a law professor and former president of the American Civil Liberties Union, about her new book, Hate: Why We Should Resist It With Free Speech, Not Censorship.

Free Speech vs. Hate Speech

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Sam Sanders and author Samantha Irby (middle) with WBEZ's Jennifer White. Allison King /WBEZ hide caption

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Allison King /WBEZ

Live in Chicago with Samantha Irby

Here's a break from the news: Comedian and author Samantha Irby joins Sam live on stage at Chicago's Old Town School of Folk Music in partnership with WBEZ. Her recently re-published book is called "Meaty." Plus special guest Jennifer White drops by to dish about two famous Chicagoans — the subjects of WBEZ's "Making Obama" and "Making Oprah" podcasts. Back with our regular weekly wrap next Friday.

Live in Chicago with Samantha Irby

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The Opposition with Jordan Klepper airs at 11:30, weeknights on Comedy Central Comedy Central hide caption

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Comedy Central

Comedian and "Opposition" Host Jordan Klepper

The comedian and talks to Sam about running his own show, lampooing fringe news, and why the nicest parts of him are from Kalamazoo, Michigan. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Comedian and "Opposition" Host Jordan Klepper

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Weekly Wrap: "On Bended Knee."

Sam is struck by two guests this week: Los Angeles Times reporter Laura Nelson, and senior writer at ESPN's "The Undefeated," Clinton Yates. They cover new NFL rules, Ramadan, North Korea, and lynx. Or lynxes. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "On Bended Knee."

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BØRNS: Glam, Sunshine, and 'Electric Love'

Sam talks to singer Garrett Clark Borns in his Los Angeles studio on going from small town Michigan to playing at Coachella - TWICE. BØRNS' new album, Blue Madonna, is out now. Email samsanders@npr.org or tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

BØRNS: Glam, Sunshine, and 'Electric Love'

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Weekly Wrap: "Just Say It."

Sam's right over here with NPR reporters Vanessa Romo and Brakkton Booker wrapping up the week in news: one year into the Mueller investigation, the royal wedding, and upcoming Supreme Court decisions on gerrymandering. Plus, the best things that happened to listeners all week. Tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels or email samsanders@npr.org.

Weekly Wrap: "Just Say It."

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How Ruth Bader Ginsburg Became 'Notorious RBG'

In 'RBG,' filmmakers Julie Cohen and Betsy West chronicle the legacy of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. NPR's legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg joins the conversation with Sam, Betsy, and Julie. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

How Ruth Bader Ginsburg Became 'Notorious RBG'

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Weekly Wrap: "Where's My Money?"

Sam's voice takes you there this week, with NPR Editor Arezou Rezvani and Los Angeles Times national correspondent Matt Pearce. Plus, the Iran Nuclear Deal, wage stagnation, and 'This Is America.' Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "Where's My Money?"

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Jimmy O. Yang on 'Silicon Valley' and 'How To American'

The comedian and actor talks to Sam about his immigrant experience and making it in Hollywood, which he writes about in a new book, "How To American: An Immigrant's Guide To Disappointing Your Parents." Jimmy stars as immigrant programmer Jìan-Yáng on the HBO comedy "Silicon Valley." Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Jimmy O. Yang on 'Silicon Valley' and 'How To American'

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Weekly Wrap: "Check The Tape."

Sam lets the sunshine in with NPR Code Switch correspondent Karen Grigsby Bates (@karenbates) and NPR Embedded producer and reporter Tom Dreisbach (@TomDreisbach). Also Rudy Giuliani, the Broadway musical "Hair," meatballs, and a call to Puerto Rico. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels.

Weekly Wrap: "Check The Tape."

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The Political 'Circus' of 2018

Political strategists Mark McKinnon and Mike Murphy join Sam to talk about the 2018 midterms and Mark's Showtime series 'The Circus,' which he co-hosts. Mike is a Republican who's worked for John McCain, Jeb Bush, and Mitt Romney. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org and tweet @NPRItsBeenAMin with feels. Tickets for our May 15 show in Chicago are at wbez.org/events.

The Political 'Circus' of 2018

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