It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.
It's been a minute with Sam Sanders.
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It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

From NPR

A talk show with a heart. Each week, Sam interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

Most Recent Episodes

A redacted version of the report on special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 elections was released this week. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: The Mueller Report, Notre Dame, 2020 Fundraising

The U.S. Department of Justice released a redacted version of Robert Mueller's report on Russian interference in the 2016 election. Where do things stand now that it's out? After a massive fire destroyed portions of the centuries-old Notre Dame cathedral in Paris, billions of dollars have already been pledged to rebuild it. Plus, what does a historically black, all-male college's decision to begin accepting transgender men signal about cultural attitudes toward gender? Sam is joined this week by NPR lead political editor Domenico Montanaro and Associated Press national political reporter Juana Summers.

Weekly Wrap: The Mueller Report, Notre Dame, 2020 Fundraising

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Immigrants being sworn in as naturalized US citizens in 1929. A national immigration law passed five years earlier, in 1924, greatly reduced the number of non-white immigrants to the US. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Adam Serwer On White Nationalism's American Roots

The Atlantic staff writer Adam Serwer explains how racism and white nationalism were deeply embedded in America not just from its founding, but throughout the 20th century — and how one man corralled those ideas into a grand pseudo-scientific theory that influenced U.S. immigration policy and eventually Nazi Germany. His article about that man, Madison Grant, is called "White Nationalism's Deep American Roots." Email the show at samsanders@npr.org

Adam Serwer On White Nationalism's American Roots

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Facebook added a new "Tribute" feature to allow users to share posts on the memorialized accounts of deceased users. KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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KIRILL KUDRYAVTSEV/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Tax Season Nears Its End, Plus Our Digital Lives After We Die

The deadline to file your taxes is right around the corner. We ask a tax preparer how things have changed since the Republican-led tax overhaul. After Facebook introduced a new feature to help memorialize deceased users, Elise wonders what becomes of our online presences after we die. Plus what's going on at the U.S. southern border and what closing it could mean. Guest host Elise Hu is joined by KPBS reporters Jean Guerrero and Claire Trageser.

Weekly Wrap: Tax Season Nears Its End, Plus Our Digital Lives After We Die

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Anthony Carrigan attends the 70th Emmy Awards at Microsoft Theater on September 17, 2018 in Los Angeles. His co-star Bill Hader won that night's Emmy for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Comedy Series. Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic hide caption

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Jeff Kravitz/FilmMagic

Anthony Carrigan On 'Barry'

A few years after he was told he should quit acting, Anthony Carrigan shines as NoHo Hank on HBO's 'Barry.' He talks to guest host Elise Hu about working with Bill Hader, empathizing with the villains he plays, and finding peace with a condition that once made a career in Hollywood seem out of reach. 'Barry' airs Sunday nights on HBO. Email the show at samsanders@npr.org.

Anthony Carrigan On 'Barry'

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Former US Vice President Al Gore attends a session of the World Economic Forum. FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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FABRICE COFFRINI/AFP/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Why Pop Songs Are Getting Shorter, Plus Climate Change, Opioids And CBD

Al Gore is still leading the fight against climate change, but the topic is now also becoming an issue of racial justice. How will it play out in 2020? The fallout of the opioid crisis continues as lawsuits against opioid manufacturers pile up. Plus, how streaming services are reshaping the art form of the pop song. Sam is joined by Dan Zak of The Washington Post and Sarah Halzack of Bloomberg Opinion.

Weekly Wrap: Why Pop Songs Are Getting Shorter, Plus Climate Change, Opioids And CBD

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Karamo's new book is called Karamo: My Story of Embracing Purpose, Healing, and Hope Alex Rhoades hide caption

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Alex Rhoades

Karamo Brown On 'Queer Eye' & 'Embracing Purpose'

Fab Fiver Karamo Brown takes Sam to church, so to speak, in this episode recorded in front of a live audience at Sixth & I in Washington, D.C. Sam and Karamo spoke about his new memoir, 'Karamo Brown: My Story of Embracing Purpose, Healing, and Hope.'

Karamo Brown On 'Queer Eye' & 'Embracing Purpose'

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Apple Inc. CEO Tim Cook and Oprah Winfrey stand onstage during a company product launch event where Apple announced the launch of its new video streaming service. Michael Short/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Short/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: Streaming Service Wars, Plus How Our Minds Handle The Unknown

Apple's announcement that it would enter the competitive world of video streaming services has Sam wondering what the future of TV looks like. He's joined by 'Invisibilia' hosts Alix Spiegel and Hanna Rosin, who are digging into how our minds fill in gaps when something is unknown.

Weekly Wrap: Streaming Service Wars, Plus How Our Minds Handle The Unknown

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Comedian Mo Amer performs on NBC's The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon on February 20, 2019. NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images hide caption

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NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Comedian Mo Amer On The Refugee Experience, #MeToo And Touring The World

Mo Amer joins Sam to talk about his experience emigrating from Kuwait to Houston and the almost-constant code-switching he did growing up. He also shares his thoughts about #MeToo in the comedy world. This episode contains explicit discussion about sexual issues pertaining to the #MeToo movement.

Comedian Mo Amer On The Refugee Experience, #MeToo And Touring The World

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Rashard Odomes #1 of the Oklahoma Sooners shoots against Dominik Olejniczak #13 of the Mississippi Rebels in the first half during the first round of the 2019 NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Weekly Wrap: March Madness, 2020 Dems Shift Left, Plus What #DoingThings Really Means

With March Madness in full swing, the debate over whether the NCAA should compensate athletes resurfaces once again. 2020 Democratic presidential candidates continue to unveil progressive policy positions. Plus, how Outdoor Voices' #DoingThings slogan fits into a moment where lines between advertising and everyday life are increasingly blurry. Julia Furlan fills in for Sam, and she's flanked by Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch and Arnie Seipel from NPR Politics.

Weekly Wrap: March Madness, 2020 Dems Shift Left, Plus What #DoingThings Really Means

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Greta Lee (right) as Maxine, with Rebecca Henderson as Lizzy in Russian Doll. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

'Russian Doll' Star Greta Lee

"Sweet birthday baby!" Greta Lee talks about her role in the critically acclaimed Netflix show 'Russian Doll,' starring Natasha Lyonne as a woman who can't stop dying and reliving the same night. Greta tells guest-host Julia Furlan how the show was reincarnated from a failed NBC pilot, why she still struggles to avoid Asian-American stereotypes in television and what to expect from the HBO show she's developing.

'Russian Doll' Star Greta Lee

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