It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders Each week, Sam Sanders interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.
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It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

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Each week, Sam Sanders interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

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James McBride attends The Miami Book Fair at Miami Dade College Wolfson - Chapman Conference Center on November 16, 2017 in Miami, Florida. Johnny Louis/WireImage hide caption

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Johnny Louis/WireImage

James McBride On Hope, Community And 'A Place Of Miracles'

For the holiday, Sam revisits his conversation with award-winning author James McBride. McBride's latest book Deacon King Kong tells the story of how one man's decision brings together the different racial communities of 1960s Brooklyn to solve a larger issue. Sam chats with McBride as he shares his thoughts on the hope he has for communities, the parallels he sees to the world we're living in today, and why he's still optimistic, despite protests and a pandemic.

James McBride On Hope, Community And 'A Place Of Miracles'

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Tara Moore/Getty Images

Presenting Life Kit: How To Have Better Conversations

With the holidays coming, we're all trying to figure out how to celebrate with loved ones from a distance. When all we have to connect this year are phone calls and video chats, how do we make the most out of our conversations? In this episode from NPR's Life Kit Sam gets advice from the owner of a hair salon, whose job has taught her to be a good conversationalist. Then, Sam talks to journalist and professional speaker Celeste Headlee. Celeste, who gave a TED talk on this topic, shares her guidance on how to have more meaningful conversations.

Presenting Life Kit: How To Have Better Conversations

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Georgia State welcome sign at rest stop near Georgia border. Marje/Getty Images hide caption

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Marje/Getty Images

Georgia's Senate Runoffs, Plus W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu Talk Politics

Georgia's Senate runoffs have become national races as control of the Senate depends on who wins. Sam asks Tia Mitchell, Washington correspondent for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, if Georgia voters are looking at the runoffs the way the rest of the country is. Then, Sam chats with comedians W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu, hosts of the podcast "Politically Re-Active", about how the Left is processing the results of the 2020 election.

Georgia's Senate Runoffs, Plus W. Kamau Bell and Hari Kondabolu Talk Politics

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Then President-elect Donald Trump speaks as one of his attorneys stands by during a news conference on Jan. 11, 2017, at Trump Tower in New York. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

Why Donald Trump Is The Houdini Of Bad Business

What's next for President Trump once he leaves the White House? And what's next for his business? And what's he being investigated for again? And by whom?

Why Donald Trump Is The Houdini Of Bad Business

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Bobby Shmurda is the subject of a series of episodes from NPR Music's Louder Than A Riot podcast. Dale Edwin Murray for NPR hide caption

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Dale Edwin Murray for NPR

Louder Than A Riot: 'The Badder, The Better: Bobby Shmurda (Pt 1)'

The rapper Bobby Shmurda had a big viral hit in 2014, and it looked like he was going to be a star. But just months later, Bobby and his friends were arrested and charged in connection with a murder and several other shootings. Our friends at NPR Music podcast Louder Than A Riot trace the interconnected rise of hip-hop and mass incarceration, and they take a look at Bobby's story in this episode.

Louder Than A Riot: 'The Badder, The Better: Bobby Shmurda (Pt 1)'

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President-elect Joe Biden waves as he leaves The Queen theater, Tuesday, Nov. 10, 2020, in Wilmington, Del. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Biden's Coronavirus Response, Plus Comedian Matt Rogers

What could a new president mean for the coronavirus pandemic? Sam talks to Ed Yong, staff writer at The Atlantic, about President-elect Joe Biden's coronavirus task force and how much the federal government can do to change the course of the pandemic. Then, Sam chats with comedian Matt Rogers, whose projects this year include competition show Haute Dog on HBO Max, Quibi's Gayme Show and the podcast Las Culturistas (which he hosts with SNL's Bowen Yang). They talk about pop culture and what's giving them joy in 2020.

Biden's Coronavirus Response, Plus Comedian Matt Rogers

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Talia Lavin infiltrated white supremacist online groups for more than a year to research her book Culture Warlords: My Journey into the Dark Web of White Supremacy. Courtesy of Talia Lavin hide caption

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Courtesy of Talia Lavin

White Supremacy And Its Online Reach

Talia Lavin went undercover in white supremacist online communities, creating fake personas that would gain her access to the dark reaches of the internet normally off-limits to her, a Jewish woman. That research laid the groundwork for her book, Culture Warlords: My Journey Into the Dark Web of White Supremacy. Lavin talks to Sam about what it was like to infiltrate those online spaces, what she learned, and how white supremacy cannot exist without anti-Semitism.

White Supremacy And Its Online Reach

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Zhanon Morales, 30, during a rally outside the Pennsylvania Convention Center, Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020. Rebecca Blackwell/AP hide caption

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Rebecca Blackwell/AP

What's Next For Biden And Democrats?

Joe Biden appears to be inching closer to a victory, but there wasn't a blowout for Democrats this election. Sam talks to New York Times national political reporter Astead Herndon about what we know, what we thought we knew, and what the results could mean for the left moving forward.

What's Next For Biden And Democrats?

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President Donald Trump dances after speaking at a campaign rally at Oakland County International Airport, Friday, Oct. 30, 2020, in Waterford Township, Mich. Jose Juarez/AP hide caption

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Jose Juarez/AP

What's Next For Trump And Republicans?

With the election still too close to call, The Atlantic reporter McKay Coppins joins Sam with the latest on what we know about the results, what they mean for President Trump, and how much Trumpism will live on in the Republican Party.

What's Next For Trump And Republicans?

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Lori Gottlieb is a psychotherapist and author of The New York Times bestseller, Maybe You Should Talk to Someone. Shayan Asgharnia hide caption

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Shayan Asgharnia

How To Take Care Of Yourself This Election Season

It's Election Day, but instead of the latest politics news, we're giving you some therapy. Sam shares listener questions around mental health issues with psychotherapist Lori Gottlieb. In addition to her clinical practice, Gottlieb is the New York Times best-selling author behind Maybe You Should Talk To Someone: A Therapist, HER Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed. She and Sam discuss burnout, white guilt, and when the right time is to reach out to a therapist. Gottlieb also co-hosts the podcast Dear Therapists and writes the weekly advice column 'Dear Therapist' for The Atlantic.

How To Take Care Of Yourself This Election Season

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