It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders Each week, Sam Sanders interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.
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It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

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Each week, Sam Sanders interviews people in the culture who deserve your attention. Plus weekly wraps of the news with other journalists. Join Sam as he makes sense of the world through conversation.

Most Recent Episodes

The Bench draped for the death of Supreme Court Associate Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg at the Supreme Court in Washington. Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. Fred Schilling/AP hide caption

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Fred Schilling/AP

Supreme Court Misconceptions

When the biggest news stories happen all at once, it's easy to miss what each of them really means. Since Supreme Court justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's death last week, there have been questions about who will replace her and what it means for the court. Sam talks to Slate's Mark Joseph Stern about the Supreme Court's history and what recent discussions get wrong. Then, Democrats and progressives brought in massive fundraising dollars in the days after Justice Ginsburg's death. Sam chats with Julie Bykowicz of the Wall Street Journal about what all that money means. Finally, Sam talks to Tina Vasquez of Prism about the forced sterilization of immigrants in a Georgia detention center, and why it's important to see the bigger picture.

Supreme Court Misconceptions

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Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is the subject of the award-winning documentary RBG. She passed away at 87 on Sep. 18, 2020. Magnolia Pictures/CNN Films hide caption

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Magnolia Pictures/CNN Films

The Life And Legacy Of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg passed away last week at the age of 87. The conversation has quickly moved to the politics around her replacement, but what kind of legacy did she leave? In the award-winning documentary RBG, filmmakers Julie Cohen and Betsy West chronicle the life of Ginsburg, from her rise to the judicial branch to becoming the 'Notorious RBG.' NPR legal affairs correspondent Nina Totenberg also joins this encore conversation with Sam, Betsy, and Julie.

The Life And Legacy Of Ruth Bader Ginsburg

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Pre-school teacher Mikki Laugier, right, guides students in a lesson as they participate in an outdoor learning demonstration to display methods schools can use to continue on-site education during the coronavirus pandemic, Wednesday, Sept. 2, 2020, at P.S. 15 in the Red Hook neighborhood of the Brooklyn borough of New York. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

Coronavirus And Teachers

This school year is proving to be unlike any other. Teaching might be a nightmare in schools doing hybrid learning, a success for those doing virtual learning, or vice versa. It all depends on which school district you're in and what resources and funding you might be able to access. So what's the experience been like so far for the teachers trying to make school happen?

Coronavirus And Teachers

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Karen Speros, 82, waits for a movie to start at a Regal movie theater in Irvine, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 8, 2020. Jae C. Hong/AP hide caption

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Jae C. Hong/AP

Movie Industry Adapts, Plus LeVar Burton Reads

The movie industry is hurting. Most theaters in the U.S. are still shut down, and who knows when—or if—audiences will pack into theaters again. Adam B. Vary and Angelique Jackson of Variety talk about the state of the movie industry and how it's adapted, for better or worse, in this pandemic. Also, Sam talks to actor LeVar Burton about reading, why we like being read to, what he really wanted you to learn from Reading Rainbow, and the latest season of his podcast LeVar Burton Reads.

Movie Industry Adapts, Plus LeVar Burton Reads

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Larry Wilmore's new late night show Wilmore premieres Sept. 18 on the NBC streaming service Peacock. PR hide caption

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PR

Larry Wilmore's Return to Late Night

Larry Wilmore has a resume that could rival pretty much anyone's in Hollywood. Name a show and he probably had his hands in it. He created The Bernie Mac Show, co-created Insecure, wrote for shows like In Living Color, The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, and The Office, and served as the "Senior Black Correspondent" on The Daily Show. He also had his own late night show called The Nightly Show.

Larry Wilmore's Return to Late Night

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Embers light up a hillside behind the Bidwell Bar Bridge as the Bear Fire burns in Oroville, Calif., on Wednesday, Sept. 9, 2020. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

West Coast On Fire, Plus Comedian Sam Jay

The smoke, the flames, the creepy orange and red skies. It's fire season out west and it's already one for the books. Sam talks a resident of Napa County, CA, who had to flee her home because of the fires. Then he's joined by New York Times opinion writer Farhad Manjoo, who is convinced this is the end of California as we know it. Finally, comedian and SNL writer Sam Jay talks about her new Netflix special 3 O'Clock in the Morning.

West Coast On Fire, Plus Comedian Sam Jay

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Claudia Rankine's new book "Just Us: An American Conversation" Graywolf Press/AP hide caption

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Graywolf Press/AP

Poet Claudia Rankine And 'Just Us'

Poet Claudia Rankine is back with a new book called Just Us: An American Conversation. Much like her acclaimed 2014 book of poetry, Citizen: An American Lyric, her new volume offers an unflinching examination of race and racism in the United States — this time in conversations with friends and strangers. Guest host Audie Cornish talks to Rankine about what she learned about herself and others in these conversations, why she doesn't mind educating others about race, and how we move forward together in tough times.

Poet Claudia Rankine And 'Just Us'

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In this Thursday Aug. 27, 2020 photo, Assistant Director Tammy Cavanaugh, left, takes the temperature of Maverick Barbera has he is held by his mother Katrina Meli at Educational Playcare, in Glastonbury, Conn. Jessica Hill/AP hide caption

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Jessica Hill/AP

Pandemic Childcare; Plus Mukbang Meets True Crime

Guest host Elise Hu looks at how the pandemic has exacerbated existing problems when it comes to the care of small children. A Massachusetts childcare center owner shares her story about reopening, while a public policy professor talks about the difficult choices women often have to make between their careers and caregiving. Also, a look at how mukbang and true crime collide in the world of Stephanie Soo, a YouTube star and host of the Rotten Mango podcast.

Pandemic Childcare; Plus Mukbang Meets True Crime

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Bill Nye presents science for adults in Bill Nye Saves the World on Netflix. Eddy Chen/Netflix hide caption

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Eddy Chen/Netflix

How Bill Nye Became the 'Science Guy'

Sam revisits his 2017 chat with Bill Nye the Science Guy. They discuss climate change (and climate change deniers), how Nye got his start in TV, and whether fame has changed him, for better or worse.

How Bill Nye Became the 'Science Guy'

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KQED podcast Truth Be Told is hosted by Tonya Mosley. KQED hide caption

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KQED

Bonus Episode: 'Truth Be Told'

A special bonus feed drop from the KQED podcast Truth Be Told, hosted by Tonya Mosley. A conversation about parenting during the pandemic — there's no right way to do it. Tonya and two Wise Ones, Nancy Redd, author and mother, and Wajahat Ali, New York Times contributor and father, answer questions about parenting during this tricky time.

Bonus Episode: 'Truth Be Told'

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