Rough Translation How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.
Rough Translation
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Rough Translation

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How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.

Most Recent Episodes

Chinese exchange Student Li Jiabao (李家宝 aka 李家寶). Li is seeking asylum in China after posting a video that went viral on Twitter criticizing the Chinese president and Communist Party. NPR's Emily Feng hide caption

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NPR's Emily Feng

The Original Sin Of Li Jiabao

A young Chinese exchange student in Taiwan with no history of activism posts a video criticizing China's president Xi Jinping on Twitter, then asks for asylum. His request for protection fuels a larger discussion about Taiwan's role as a haven for Chinese dissidents, and also raises questions about who he is as an individual and his motivations. Who is he, and can he be trusted?

The Original Sin Of Li Jiabao

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Assassinated Major-General Qassem Soleimani. AP hide caption

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AP

Rough Translation Presents: Throughline

This week, we present the latest episode of NPR's Throughline, a look at the life and complicated legacy of the assassinated Iranian military leader, Qassem Soleimani.

Rough Translation Presents: Throughline

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A comedy team rehearses their sketch, at the Palace of Culture in Kramatorsk, Ukraine. Gregory Warner hide caption

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Gregory Warner

Whose Ukraine Is It Anyway?

Please, take our survey! At a Ukrainian comedy competition founded by President Volodymyr Zelensky, can humor unite a divided country?

Whose Ukraine Is It Anyway?

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A march through the streets of Kyiv. Gregory Warner hide caption

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Gregory Warner

Ukraine: Race Against The Machine

In the country on the other side of the impeachment hearings... A comedian runs for president of Ukraine and wins in a landslide, with a parliamentary majority to pass any law he wants. So now what? Our host, Gregory Warner, reports from Kyiv.

Ukraine: Race Against The Machine

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Preview: Rough Translation In Ukraine

Listen to hear a preview of a special two-part episode about Ukraine, reported by Gregory Warner.

Preview: Rough Translation In Ukraine

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After feeling like he belonged more in Japan than the USA, an American 6-year-old drew the Japanese flag when asked to draw the flag of his home country. Autumn Barnes hide caption

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Autumn Barnes

Mom In Translation

For our season finale, a listener's story: When a six-year-old boy adopts Tokyo as his new home, his American mom has to figure out where she belongs in her son's new life.

Mom In Translation

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Residents of an immigrant neighborhood in northern Marseille gather outside of a McDonald's they are fighting to keep open. Eleanor Beardsley hide caption

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Eleanor Beardsley

Liberté, Égalité and French Fries

What happens when the employees of a French McDonald's take the corporate philosophy so deeply to heart, that it actually becomes a problem for the company?

Liberté, Égalité and French Fries

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For Danna Harman, a trip to Nepal changed the way she thought about love and family. Danna Harman hide caption

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Danna Harman

When We Talk About Love

We visit a storytelling podcast from China that slips under the radar of China's government censors, and other international podcast stories about the search for love.

When We Talk About Love

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Students at the University of Pelotas. Twenty percent of the students were admitted under an affirmative action policy for black or pardo students. courtesy of Mario Theodoro hide caption

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courtesy of Mario Theodoro

Brazil In Black And White: Update

Two radically different ways of seeing race come into conflict in Brazil, provoking a national conversation about who is Black? And who is not Black enough? We revisit our first ever Rough Translation episode, with an update on how the election of an anti-affirmative action president is affecting the debate.

Brazil In Black And White: Update

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This is an excerpt from a real script used in an international sweepstakes scam based out of Costa Rica. Autumn Barnes-Fraser hide caption

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Autumn Barnes-Fraser

The Mind Of The Mark

If you're the kind of person who thinks you can't be conned, that assumption may make it harder for you to recognize when you actually are being scammed. We speak with professional poker player and author Maria Konnikova about how con-artists get inside the stories we all tell ourselves, about ourselves. Then we go to an international multimillion dollar scam in Costa Rica, where a master of the con meets his match... the IT guy.

The Mind Of The Mark

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