Rough Translation How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.
Rough Translation School of Scandal
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Rough Translation

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How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.

Most Recent Episodes

Chinese celebrity Xiao Zhan at an event in Nanjing, China, promoting his web drama, The Untamed. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG via Getty Images

Dream Boy And The Poison Fans

A Chinese idol had millions of fans who adored him for his kindness and good looks. Then, this February, one group of fans accused another of violating their image of him. What happens is a lesson in morality and revenge, love and hate, and how these feelings are weaponized on the internet.

Dream Boy And The Poison Fans

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Rough Translation is back on September 16 with a new series, "School of Scandal." NPR hide caption

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NPR

New Season: School of Scandal... Coming Sept. 16

We're back with a special series, Rough Translation's "School of Scandal," stories about people around the world calling each other out and taking each other down to change the status quo.

New Season: School of Scandal... Coming Sept. 16

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A crew of Venezuelans push and carry their belongings along a highway in Ecuador during the pandemic, determined to get home, even if they have to walk. Orlando Pimentel hide caption

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Orlando Pimentel

El Hilo: Walking To Venezuela

One man's mission to get hundreds of his fellow Venezuelans back home from Ecuador in a pandemic, even if it means walking all 1,300 miles. This story was originally reported for El Hilo, a new podcast from the makers of NPR's Radio Ambulante.

El Hilo: Walking To Venezuela

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A County Roscommon resident holds a radio provided by the Lions Club and Tesco Supermarket to listen to The Rossie Way. Ciaran Mullooly/RTE hide caption

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Ciaran Mullooly/RTE

Hello, Neighbor

Ireland's "cocooning" policy during the coronavirus lockdown asked people over age 70 to stay at home and not to leave for any reason. Suddenly, neighbors and strangers leapt to help them with everything — if the cocooners would let them.

Hello, Neighbor

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A protestor at a rally against the Dutch holiday character, Black Pete, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Romy Arroyo Fernandez/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Romy Arroyo Fernandez/NurPhoto via Getty Images

So Long, Black Pete

Resolving conflict through consensus is a very Dutch tradition. But how do you compromise when it comes to racism? This week on Rough Translation, the controversial Dutch character Black Pete, and how Black Lives Matter may have helped change the holiday season in the Netherlands forever.

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Syrian artist Aziz Alasmar paints a mural of George Floyd on the remains of a collapsed building in Binnish, a town in Syria's Idlib province. Mohamad Jamalo hide caption

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Mohamad Jamalo

The Global Legacy of George Floyd

Five personal stories from five continents on the global impact of George Floyd.

The Global Legacy of George Floyd

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A new French law requires masks be worn in certain public spaces, but it is still illegal to wear religious attire that covers the face. Halisia Hubbard/NPR hide caption

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Halisia Hubbard/NPR

From Niqab To N95

The French republic "lives with her face uncovered," say the posters. But now face masks are mandatory. We look back at why covering your face in France used to be a sign of bad citizenship, until it wasn't.

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Amram and Gina Maman (second and third from left) with Aysha Abu Shhab (fourth from left) and other hotel patients. Aysha Abu Shhab hide caption

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Aysha Abu Shhab

Hotel Corona

One hundred and eighty recovering COVID-19 patients. One Jerusalem hotel. Secular, religious, Arabs, Jews, old, young. Their phones are out, they're recording. And the rest of Israel is... tuning in.

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A green sweater that Jessie crocheted in China while waiting for Jacquie, her American surrogate, to deliver her baby. Jessie, Reproduced With Permission hide caption

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Jessie, Reproduced With Permission

American Surrogate: 30 Months Later

Back in 2017, we brought you the story of a Chinese mom who hired an American surrogate to carry her baby. Each needed something from the other that was hard to admit. Their relationship became a crash course in transcontinental communication and the meaning of family. Now, in the middle of a pandemic, we check in with them.

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"People who are stigmatized say they're made to feel that they are the disease themselves," said NPR correspondent Anthony Kuhn of some residents of South Korea, where the government publicizes personal data on COVID-19 carriers. Bernhard Lang/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernhard Lang/Getty Images

The Coronavirus Guilt Trip

Public shame is a powerful tool. But how useful is it when trying to curb a global pandemic? Shaming stories from South Korean chat rooms, a Pakistani street corner, and a Brooklyn grocery store.

The Coronavirus Guilt Trip

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