Rough Translation How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.
Rough Translation
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Rough Translation

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How are the things we're talking about being talked about somewhere else in the world? Gregory Warner tells stories that follow familiar conversations into unfamiliar territory. At a time when the world seems small but it's as hard as ever to escape our echo chambers, Rough Translation takes you places.

Most Recent Episodes

Much recent international media attention has been focused on the U.S. presidential elections, like this live news report showing on an outdoor screen in Hong Kong. Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Miguel Candela/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

All Eyes On US

Just because you can't vote, doesn't mean you're not watching. We crisscross the globe to understand how people see their fates and fortunes in the aftermath of the 2020 U.S. election.

All Eyes On US

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NPR's 'Louder Than A Riot' reveals the interconnected rise of hip-hop and mass incarceration in the USA. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Presenting 'Louder Than A Riot': Lyrics On Trial

On this bonus drop, we feature an episode from the NPR podcast Louder Than A Riot called "Lyrics on Trial."

Presenting 'Louder Than A Riot': Lyrics On Trial

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Stella Nyanzi, an academic, activist and poet, interacts with supporters inside court on February 20, 2020 in Kampala, Uganda. Luke Dray/Getty Images hide caption

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Luke Dray/Getty Images

Radical Rudeness

After a Ugandan scholar is suspended from her university job, she discovers a new tool for resistance: extreme public rudeness. Will it work against a strongman president?

Radical Rudeness

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Richard Cizik poses for a photo for Vanity Fair, part of a feature on pro-environment leaders from various backgrounds. Mark Seliger hide caption

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Mark Seliger

The Loneliness Of The Climate Change Christian

What if more evangelical Christians in the United States fought climate change with the same spirit they bring to the issue of abortion? We go back to a surprisingly recent period when that happened.

The Loneliness Of The Climate Change Christian

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Mauktik Kulkarni (left) and Suraj Yengde (right) as children. Photos Courtesy of Mauktik Kulkarni and Suraj Yengde hide caption

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Photos Courtesy of Mauktik Kulkarni and Suraj Yengde

How To Be An Anti-Casteist

How does India's caste system play out in the hiring practices of Silicon Valley? And what happens when dominant caste people in the U.S. grapple with their own inherited privilege for the first time?

How To Be An Anti-Casteist

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Chinese celebrity Xiao Zhan at an event in Nanjing, China, promoting his web drama, The Untamed. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG via Getty Images

Dream Boy And The Poison Fans

A Chinese idol had millions of fans who adored him for his kindness and good looks. Then, this February, one group of fans accused another of violating their image of him. What happens is a lesson in morality and revenge, love and hate, and how these feelings are weaponized on the internet.

Dream Boy And The Poison Fans

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Rough Translation is back on September 16 with a new series, "School of Scandal." NPR hide caption

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NPR

New Season: School of Scandal... Coming Sept. 16

We're back with a special series, Rough Translation's "School of Scandal," stories about people around the world calling each other out and taking each other down to change the status quo.

New Season: School of Scandal... Coming Sept. 16

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A crew of Venezuelans push and carry their belongings along a highway in Ecuador during the pandemic, determined to get home, even if they have to walk. Orlando Pimentel hide caption

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Orlando Pimentel

El Hilo: Walking To Venezuela

One man's mission to get hundreds of his fellow Venezuelans back home from Ecuador in a pandemic, even if it means walking all 1,300 miles. This story was originally reported for El Hilo, a new podcast from the makers of NPR's Radio Ambulante.

El Hilo: Walking To Venezuela

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A County Roscommon resident holds a radio provided by the Lions Club and Tesco Supermarket to listen to The Rossie Way. Ciaran Mullooly/RTE hide caption

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Ciaran Mullooly/RTE

Hello, Neighbor

Ireland's "cocooning" policy during the coronavirus lockdown asked people over age 70 to stay at home and not to leave for any reason. Suddenly, neighbors and strangers leapt to help them with everything — if the cocooners would let them.

Hello, Neighbor

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A protestor at a rally against the Dutch holiday character, Black Pete, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Romy Arroyo Fernandez/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Romy Arroyo Fernandez/NurPhoto via Getty Images

So Long, Black Pete

Resolving conflict through consensus is a very Dutch tradition. But how do you compromise when it comes to racism? This week on Rough Translation, the controversial Dutch character Black Pete, and how Black Lives Matter may have helped change the holiday season in the Netherlands forever.

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