The Indicator from Planet Money A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

Got money on your mind? Try Planet Money+ — a new way to support the show you love, get a sponsor-free feed of the podcast, *and* get access to bonus content. A subscription also gets you access to The Indicator and Planet Money Summer School, both without interruptions.

The Indicator from Planet Money

From NPR

A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

Got money on your mind? Try Planet Money+ — a new way to support the show you love, get a sponsor-free feed of the podcast, *and* get access to bonus content. A subscription also gets you access to The Indicator and Planet Money Summer School, both without interruptions.

Most Recent Episodes

Presidential nominee Richard Nixon poses with a team of economic advisers in San Diego, CA, Aug. 14, 1968. From left to right; Dr. Pierre A. Rinfret; Dr. Milton Friedman; Nixon; Dr. Arthur Burns; Dr. Don Perlberg. AP hide caption

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AP

Arthur Burns: shorthand for Fed failure?

History remembers Arthur Burns as the Fed chair who let inflation run rampant. That's precisely the outcome that current Fed chair Jerome Powell wants to avoid. Today, we look back at the '70s to find out what went wrong.

Arthur Burns: shorthand for Fed failure?

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George Frey/Getty Images

The Beigie Awards: All about inventory

A Fed vice president gets a new pair of shoes. Does that mean supply chains are fixed?

The Beigie Awards: All about inventory

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Bridestowe is a lavender farm on the island of Tasmania in Australia. It became a popular destination for some Chinese tourists after a Chinese model posted a photo of herself with a Bridestowe lavender bear on social media. Bridestowe Estate hide caption

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Bridestowe Estate

The return of Chinese tourism?

Chinese citizens are once again allowed to travel internationally and the global tourism industry is ready to welcome them with open arms. Why? Chinese tourism has meant big money in the past. In 2019, Chinese travelers spent a fifth of all tourist dollars. But a full rebound in Chinese tourism might be a ways off.

The return of Chinese tourism?

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TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images

Artists vs. AI

Advancements in artificial intelligence are making replicating the work of artists much easier. Some artists are arguing that AI art generators have been breaking the law to do this. Today, we talk to an artist whose paintings are at the center of a class action.

Artists vs. AI

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LAS VEGAS, NEVADA - MARCH 23: Miniature bottles of Fireball Whisky on display during the 2022 Bar & Restaurant Expo and World Tea Conference + Expo at the Las Vegas Convention Center on March 23, 2022 in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Photo by David Becker/Getty Images for Nightclub & Bar Media Group) David Becker/Getty Images for Nightclub & Bar hide caption

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David Becker/Getty Images for Nightclub & Bar

Indicators of the Week: tips, eggs and whisky

Tips, eggs and whisky...it's a food edition of Indicators of the Week! We talk egg-spensive food costs and why at least one whisky drinker is upset with the maker of Fireball.

Indicators of the Week: tips, eggs and whisky

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Paper Boat Creative/Getty Images

What's the deal with the platinum coin?

Forget extraordinary measures. Today we're going full extra extraordinary. How a trillion-dollar platinum coin could get the country around the debt ceiling limit.

What's the deal with the platinum coin?

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WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 25: Sen. Rick Scott (R-FL) listens during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol Building on January 25, 2023 in Washington, DC. Senate Republicans held the news conference to discuss the ongoing negotiations between the House, Senate and White House over the national debt ceiling. (Photo by Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images) Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

Want a balanced federal budget? It'll cost you.

The U.S. reached its debt ceiling last week, and some lawmakers say they won't raise it unless there are also cuts to balance the budget. The problem? That would mean 25% reductions everywhere.

Want a balanced federal budget? It'll cost you.

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Michel Euler/AP

A big bank's big mistake, explained

One of the world's biggest banks acquires a promising tech company, and things go very, very wrong. It's a flashy tech startup story with some surprisingly low-tech twists and a web of alleged lies.

A big bank's big mistake, explained

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The great turnaround in shipping

Prices for shipping carriers have gone back down to 2019 price levels after record highs during the pandemic. So what does this mean for consumers and businesses who rely on international trade?

The great turnaround in shipping

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Noel Celis/AFP via Getty Images

Can China save its economy - and ours?

What's up with China's GDP, what's down with China's population numbers, and what Marvel's return tells us. Indicators from China to bring in the Lunar New Year.

Can China save its economy - and ours?

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