The Indicator from Planet Money A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

Got money on your mind? Try Planet Money+ — a new way to support the show you love, get a sponsor-free feed of the podcast, *and* get access to bonus content. A subscription also gets you access to The Indicator and Planet Money Summer School, both without interruptions.

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The Indicator from Planet Money

From NPR

A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

Got money on your mind? Try Planet Money+ — a new way to support the show you love, get a sponsor-free feed of the podcast, *and* get access to bonus content. A subscription also gets you access to The Indicator and Planet Money Summer School, both without interruptions.

Most Recent Episodes

U.S. President Joe Biden speaks about gas prices. Biden called on Congress to temporarily suspend the federal gas tax. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Why a gas tax holiday might not be something to celebrate

Amid daunting gas prices, President Biden's proposed federal gas tax holiday sounds like a sweet relief. But the economics behind this tax break reveals the push and pull between consumers and oil companies, and an unexpected outcome.

Why a gas tax holiday might not be something to celebrate

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Gold bullion bars. DAVID GRAY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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DAVID GRAY/AFP via Getty Images

All roads lead to Russian indicators

After the G7 talks, we're turning our attention back to Russia. But in typical The Indicator fashion, we're zooming in on three global commodities affected by the ongoing war: gold, oil, and wheat.

All roads lead to Russian indicators

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The Wall Street bull. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Where 'bull market' and 'bear market' come from

Have you ever wondered where the terms 'bull' and 'bear' markets originated from? Today on the show, we're journeying back to the 1700s to find out how a particular financial event popularized these animal terms.

Where 'bull market' and 'bear market' come from

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Protest against Russia's invasion of Ukraine after Britain imposed a biting package of sanctions on Russia. JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images

Russia's sanctions, graded

On a scale of 1 to 10, how effective are the sanctions on Russia? Today on the show, we're grading the hodgepodge of sanctions aimed at persuading Russia to withdraw its troops from Ukraine.

Russia's sanctions, graded

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A gold plated souvenir cryptocurrency Tether (USDT) coin arranged beside a screen displaying US dollar notes. JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP via Getty Images

The promise and peril of crypto for Black investors

Black consumers are more likely to own crypto than white consumers and crypto enthusiasts laud the crypto world as a driver for racial equity. In today's show we explore that premise. If you're interested in learning more, listen to the episode and check out Terri Bradford's article on Black crypto ownership.

The promise and peril of crypto for Black investors

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Images from the Bored Ape Yacht Club NFT series. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

The celebrity crypto nexus

From Jimmy Fallon to Reese Witherspoon, why are so many celebrities promoting crypto? We untangle the web of connections between Hollywood A-listers, Bored Apes, and one influential talent agency, with journalist Max Read. He wrote about this in his Substack newsletter, Read Max.

The celebrity crypto nexus

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American fast-food hamburger restaurant Carl's Jr, in the center of St. Petersburg. OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP via Getty Images

Burgers in Russia, Juul vaporized, THE trademarked

This Friday, we're looking at fast-food companies who are still hanging on in Russia. Juul getting banned. And as a cherry on top, THE Ohio State University deciding to patent you guessed it, "the."

Burgers in Russia, Juul vaporized, THE trademarked

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A Bitcoin ATM. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Does Bitcoin have a grip on the economy?

The crypto market has taken a beating lately, and even though Bitcoin and other crypto assets are risky, they're becoming more mainstream. How concerned do we need to be about the recent crypto collapse?

Does Bitcoin have a grip on the economy?

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Jerome Powell, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System testifies before the Senate Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs Committee. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

What took the Fed so long?

What took the Fed so long to address high inflation? Today on the show, we're exploring six reasons behind the Fed's hesitancy to hike interest rates, according to Bill Nelson, who spent two decades working for the Federal Reserve. For more background, check out our episode last week, Jerome Powell's ghosts.

What took the Fed so long?

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People are reflected in the window of the Nasdaq MarketSite in Times Square. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

The price of free stock trading

Everyone's a stock trader these days. With a press of a button, companies like Robinhood allow everyday people to buy and sell shares with no fee. But, this practice is just a tad bit controversial.

The price of free stock trading

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