The Indicator from Planet Money A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

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The Indicator from Planet Money

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A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

Most Recent Episodes

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The rise and fall (and rise?) of organized labor

In the wake of the "great resignation", organized labor may be having a moment in the U.S. Tens of thousands of workers have protested working conditions at companies like John Deere and Kellogg's and, in recent months, workers across the country have chosen or threatened strike action. Today on the show, author Erik Loomis shares how the history of America's unions explains today's labor movement.

The rise and fall (and rise?) of organized labor

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Indicators-giving! How Much Does Thanksgiving Cost This Year?

How much will Thanksgiving dinner cost compared to last year? Today on the show, the Indicator team gathers around the virtual Thanksgiving table to let you know how much prices have changed for each holiday favorite.

Indicators-giving! How Much Does Thanksgiving Cost This Year?

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Ticket scalpers: The real ticket masters

Ticket scalpers. They're the bane of every fan's existence because they manage to snag concert tickets before fans can even get their webpages to load. An economist would tell you the story is more complicated than that.

Ticket scalpers: The real ticket masters

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Jeromonomics 2.0

Today President Biden reappointed Jerome Powell as chair of the Federal Reserve. So we revisit a recent episode about Jay Powell's first term and his approach to steering the economy — Jeromonomics.

Jeromonomics 2.0

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BONUS: Wisdom From The Top

This episode is from our friends at the podcast Wisdom From The Top, featuring our very own Stacey Vanek Smith!

BONUS: Wisdom From The Top

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An exuberant bid for the Constitution

It's that time again! A crypto group fails to buy an original copy of the U.S. Constitution, Crypto.com succeeds in renaming LA's Staples Center, and warnings the economy might be too exuberant.

An exuberant bid for the Constitution

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Rumor has it Adele broke the vinyl supply chain

We're in the midst of a vinyl boom and chains like Walmart have been cashing in. But so have stars like Adele, who reportedly pressed over 500,000 records for her new album, "30." Today on the show, has Adele really clogged the fragile vinyl supply chain, or should we go easy on her?

Rumor has it Adele broke the vinyl supply chain

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Should Americans buy less stuff?

Americans love to shop, and consumer spending has only increased since the start of the pandemic. Even the supply chains are tired. That's why one Bloomberg columnist believes it's time for an intervention.

Should Americans buy less stuff?

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Toyota Camry, supply-chain hero

Toyota pioneered just-in-time production. But this lean method is dangerous when car parts are in short supply, like in a pandemic. Today: How Toyota invented and reformed just-in-time production.

Toyota Camry, supply-chain hero

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'The China Shock' and the downsides of globalization

Trade with China made American goods cheaper and lifted millions of Chinese people out of poverty. At the same time, it devastated communities across America's heartland. What have we learned from the "China Shock"? And what can we do to prevent something like it from happening again?

'The China Shock' and the downsides of globalization

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