The Indicator from Planet Money A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

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The Indicator from Planet Money

From NPR

A little show about big ideas. From the people who make Planet Money, The Indicator helps you make sense of what's happening today. It's a quick hit of insight into work, business, the economy, and everything else. Listen weekday afternoons.

Most Recent Episodes

TIMOTHY A. CLARY/AFP via Getty Images

Stocks Are Up But The Economy's Down

The stock market has recovered more than half the ground lost when it crashed nearly 34 percent starting in late February. But the economy hasn't recovered. Why is there such a stark disconnect?

Stocks Are Up But The Economy's Down

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Medical University of South Carolina

Waiting For A Surge

Hospitals lost millions of dollars preparing for a surge of COVID-19 patients. Some were swamped, but others only saw a handful of coronavirus cases. Now many are struggling to survive.

Waiting For A Surge

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AIZAR RALDES/AFP via Getty Images

The Persistence Of Poverty

Melissa Dell, winner of the John Bates Clark Medal for economics, on why poverty and insecurity are so persistent in certain parts of the world.

The Persistence Of Poverty

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Public Transit Problem

Public transit systems are vital to cities. Many have been shut down or slowed during the pandemic. Now city administrators have to figure out how to reopen them.

The Public Transit Problem

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Niny Phommachanh, a marketing specialist at Brookline Bank in Massachusetts, is currently helping process the huge influx of Payment Protection Program loan applications the bank has received. photo courtesy of Niny Phommachanh /Niny Phommachanh hide caption

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photo courtesy of Niny Phommachanh /Niny Phommachanh

Small Banks' Corona Crunch

Many banks have changed the way they work, as they hurry to get billions in CARES Act cash to small businesses.

Small Banks' Corona Crunch

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Andrew Lichtenstein/Corbis via Getty Images

Waiting For A Check

State unemployment offices have been slammed, as 36 million Americans have lost their jobs. And now individuals and the U.S. economy are depending on these often underfunded operations to step up.

Waiting For A Check

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Douglas P. DeFelice/Getty Images

Reopening Sports: Does MMA Point The Way?

Mixed martial arts is the first major spectator sport in the U.S. to host live events since the coronavirus lockdown. Other sports are watching to see whether MMA could point the way.

Reopening Sports: Does MMA Point The Way?

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Brent Stirton/Getty Images

Coronavirus, Farmworkers And America's Food Supply

The working conditions on many farms mean that agricultural laborers are at high risk of getting COVID-19. That poses a real threat to those workers and to the country's food supply.

Coronavirus, Farmworkers And America's Food Supply

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ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

Pay Cuts Vs. Layoffs

Companies hammered by the economic collapse due to the coronavirus pandemic are being forced to make a hard choice: lay staff off or cut their pay.

Pay Cuts Vs. Layoffs

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Deb Compton

On Demand

The U.S. economy depends on consumer demand. And demand is way down because of the coronavirus pandemic. What happens if it doesn't come back?

On Demand

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