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Opening A Hotel During A Pandemic

The U.S. is down around 3.5 million hospitality jobs since the pandemic took hold. But in spite of setbacks, hotels continue to open.

Opening A Hotel During A Pandemic

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A Face-Punching Legal Battle

Over the past few decades, the UFC has become the biggest name in mixed martial arts. But a lawsuit argues it has held down fighter wages by restricting competition.

A Face-Punching Legal Battle

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Make Trade Stale Again

President-elect Joe Biden's inauguration will have massive implications for trade policy. Soumaya Keynes explains how Biden's approach to trade might differ from Trump's.

Make Trade Stale Again

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Bar Gernika

Winter Is Coming For The Restaurant Industry

Idaho is the leading nation in restaurant revenue growth. But that doesn't mean its restaurants are having an easy time. There are mask mandates and robust restrictions on gathering in many cities in the state, and with winter coming, restaurateurs are working hard to innovate, compensate and stay in business.

Winter Is Coming For The Restaurant Industry

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Evaluating the Washington Consensus

In 1985, then Treasury Secretary James Baker gave a speech in South Korea laying out a series of economic proposals that would transform economics around the world.

Evaluating the Washington Consensus

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How Investment Advisors Invest Their Money

Financial advisors counsel people on what stocks and bonds and other investments to buy, and how to balance portfolios. But where do they put their own money?

How Investment Advisors Invest Their Money

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Turkey Business

COVID-19-related travel and get-together restrictions are impacting small businesses across the U.S. this holiday season. The Indicator talks to a turkey farmer about how the pandemic has affected business this year.

Turkey Business

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Ant's IPO Woes

Ant Group is a fintech firm that was set to launch with the world's largest ever IPO. But just before its shares started trading, Chinese regulators pulled the plug. NPR's Emily Feng explains why.

Ant's IPO Woes

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The Lessons Of Pets.com

The tech bubble of the 90s was a time when companies with weak business models and flashy advertising secured massive investments. This is the story of perhaps the most infamous case study: Pets.com.

The Lessons Of Pets.com

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The Case Of The Soaring Car Prices

Since April, the price of used cars has surged. Some cars have even gained in value, which is highly unusual for an asset that usually depreciates. Turns out the usual suspects are behind this mystery: supply and demand.

The Case Of The Soaring Car Prices

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Credit: Kenny Malone/Planet Money

The Other Climate Crisis

In the 1980s, a massive hole was discovered in the ozone layer. Since then, economic incentives, innovation, and a historic United Nations conference in Montreal set it on a path to close completely.

The Other Climate Crisis

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Jobs Friday: Not Bad, Not Not Bad

The US economy added more than 600,000 jobs in October. Team Indicator assembles the Jobs Friday Ninja squad to get their take.

Jobs Friday: Not Bad, Not Not Bad

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When Life Gives You Lemons...Start The Mafia?

The essential ingredient in the birth of the mafia as we know it wasn't the threats or the murders or the other stuff that's great for Hollywood. It was...lemons.

When Life Gives You Lemons...Start The Mafia?

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What Elvis Can Teach Us About Vaccine Marketing

Development of a coronavirus continues apace. But as many as two-thirds of Americans say they likely won't take it. Which means a successful vaccine will need an effective marketing campaign.

What Elvis Can Teach Us About Vaccine Marketing

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How Biden And Trump Plan To Reshore Jobs

Author and economics commentator Matt Klein joins the show to discuss the ways each presidential candidate plans to bring manufacturing jobs to the United States.

How Biden And Trump Plan To Reshore Jobs

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Probability, Gambling, And Death

The concept of probability may feel intuitive today, but for much of human history, that wasn't the case. Jacob Goldstein tells the origin story of probability.

Probability, Gambling, And Death

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What Is Trumponomics?

Danielle Kurtzleben from NPR's Washington Desk breaks down Donald Trump's economic policies and plans for a second term.

What Is Trumponomics?

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What Is Bidenomics?

Danielle Kurtzleben from NPR's Washington Desk breaks down Joe Biden's economic policies.

What Is Bidenomics?

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Courtesy of Roman Mars

The 99% Invisible City With Roman Mars

Podcast host and co-author of The 99% Invisible City Roman Mars joins the show to talk about his new book, the ways people shape their cities, and how to combine beauty & function in design.

The 99% Invisible City With Roman Mars

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Questions From Kids

Stacey and Cardiff answer questions from kids...also, a few animal facts.

Questions From Kids

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Sally Herships

A New DAWN On Broadway

As arts workers continue to struggle, they're trying their hand at something new. Not a new performance or show, but a piece of legislation which would keep their industry alive through the pandemic.

A New DAWN On Broadway

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The Great Remittance Mystery

In 2019, migrants sent a record $500 billion back to their countries of origin. Then COVID hit, and the World Bank predicted a 20 percent drop in that flow of cash. But now the data is in, and it turns out remittances have held steady.

The Great Remittance Mystery

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The Case Against Google

A few days ago, The Department of Justice filed a massive antitrust lawsuit against Google. The case focuses on the company's dominance in search, but what about the rest of Google's empire?

The Case Against Google

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Hope Vs. Despair

Should we feel hope or despair about the future of the American economy? Cardiff and Stacey debate.

Hope Vs. Despair

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