Believed How did Larry Nassar, an Olympic gymnastics doctor, get away with abusing hundreds of women and girls for two decades? Believed is an inside look at how a team of women won a conviction in one of the largest serial sexual abuse cases in U.S. history. It's a story of survivors finding their power in a cultural moment when people are coming to understand how important that is. It's also an unnerving exploration of how even well-meaning adults can fail to believe.
Believed
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Believed

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How did Larry Nassar, an Olympic gymnastics doctor, get away with abusing hundreds of women and girls for two decades? Believed is an inside look at how a team of women won a conviction in one of the largest serial sexual abuse cases in U.S. history. It's a story of survivors finding their power in a cultural moment when people are coming to understand how important that is. It's also an unnerving exploration of how even well-meaning adults can fail to believe.More from Believed »

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For Larry Nassar's survivors, including Rachael Denhollander, life is now very different. Emma Winowiecki/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Emma Winowiecki/Michigan Radio

Larry Nassar Is Behind Bars, But Work Continues For His Survivors

In the end, Larry Nassar's survivors were believed. But is that enough?

Larry Nassar Is Behind Bars, But Work Continues For His Survivors

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For one week in January 2018, hundreds of women and girls told their stories about Larry Nassar's abuse. Emma Winowiecki/Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Emma Winowiecki/Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio

Larry Nassar's Survivors Speak, And Finally The World Listens — And Believes

The world watches as more than 200 women and girls confront Larry Nassar at his sentencing hearings. "Little girls don't stay little forever," says one survivor. "They grow into strong women that return to destroy your world."

Larry Nassar's Survivors Speak, And Finally The World Listens — And Believes

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Trinea Gonczar once trusted Larry Nassar, without question. Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio

For One Nassar Survivor, Recognizing Her Own Abuse Took Decades — And 2 Key Moments

Even some of Larry Nassar's victims found it hard to believe they themselves were abused. This is the story of a patient who supported him for years, despite the allegations. Hear what it took for her to finally accept the truth.

For One Nassar Survivor, Recognizing Her Own Abuse Took Decades — And 2 Key Moments

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Even now, the parents of survivors question how they could have been deceived by Larry Nassar. Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio

The Parents

Many parents were in the room when Larry Nassar abused their daughters. They had no idea it was happening. That's because Larry didn't just manipulate his victims, he manipulated their parents, too.

The Parents

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For anyone who's followed the Nassar case, Rachael Denhollander's face is a familiar one. Nicole Bolineaux/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Nicole Bolineaux/Michigan Radio

How He Got Caught

Larry Nassar's world starts to fall apart in the summer of 2016, thanks to three things: a tough Michigan detective, a team of journalists in Indiana, and a homeschooling mom from Kentucky. In this episode, you'll hear Larry's facade collapse - on tape.

How He Got Caught

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Amanda Thomashow was a graduate student at Michigan State University in 2014, when she was abused by Larry Nassar. Emma Winowiecki/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Emma Winowiecki/Michigan Radio

Gaslighting

It's time to hear from Larry, and we've got the tape. In 2014, the doctor was interviewed by a police detective after another patient reported him for sexual assault. You'll hear for yourself how Larry lies, manipulates and convinces police to believe him instead of the victim.

Gaslighting

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Kyle Stephens. Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Jodi Westrick/Michigan Radio

The Basement

Sometimes the people who don't believe you are the people who love you the most. This episode will take you into Larry Nassar's basement, through the memories of a young girl - a family friend who he abused for years.

The Basement

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Brianne Randall-Gay was 17 when she reported Larry Nassar in 2004. Kasey O'Dea/Michigan Radio hide caption

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Kasey O'Dea/Michigan Radio

How He Got Away

In this episode, we take you back to 2004 - 13 years before Dr. Larry Nassar would admit in court that he sexually abused children. This incident with a teenager will show you not just what Larry was doing to so many of his patients, but how he got away with it again and again.

How He Got Away

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Courtesy of Trinea Gonczar

The Good Guy

How did former Olympic gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar sexually abuse hundreds of girls and women for decades? To understand how he got away with it, we have to begin with the doctor in his prime, when everyone thought of him as Larry, the good guy.

The Good Guy

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NPR

Introducing Believed

How did Larry Nassar, an Olympic gymnastics doctor, get away with abusing hundreds of women and girls for more than two decades? Believed is an inside look at how a team of women won a conviction in one of the largest serial sexual abuse cases in U.S. history. It's a story of survivors finding their power in a cultural moment when people are coming to understand how important that is. It's also an unnerving exploration of how even well-meaning adults can fail to believe.

Introducing Believed

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