Life Kit Everyone needs a little help being a human. From sleep to saving money to parenting and more, we talk to the experts to get the best advice out there. Life Kit is here to help you get it together.

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Life Kit

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Everyone needs a little help being a human. From sleep to saving money to parenting and more, we talk to the experts to get the best advice out there. Life Kit is here to help you get it together.

Want another life hack? Try Life Kit+. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks an exclusive sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/lifekit.

Most Recent Episodes

When it comes to parenting, lead with connection
Tilda Rose for NPR

When it comes to parenting, lead with connection

Psychologist Becky Kennedy, author of the new book "Good Inside: A Guide to Becoming the Parent You Want to Be," urges parents to spend more time raising thoughtful humans instead of fixing their behavior.

When it comes to parenting, lead with connection

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Photographs by Unsplash/Collage by Becky Harlan/NPR

Dear Life Kit: My parents ran a background check on my partner. How can I trust them?

A daughter tries to rebuild trust with her parents after they secretly ran a background check on her boyfriend. Therapist and author Nedra Glover Tawwab shares insight on how to move forward.

Dear Life Kit: My parents ran a background check on my partner. How can I trust them?

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How much water does your body really need?
Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

How much water does your body really need?

Experts bust myths about hydration, from drinking eight glasses of water a day to using the color of your pee as an indicator for dehydration.

How much water does your body really need?

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Malaka Gharib/NPR

Stuck doing all the household chores? This practical guide can help

In four steps, experts Eve Rodsky and Jacqueline Misla explain how to fairly split domestic work with a partner or roommate. Don't forget to print out the handy zine!

Stuck doing all the household chores? This practical guide can help

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Starting a new job? 3 Tips on how to stay confident

Life Kit's new host Marielle Segarra asks friends and family for advice on how to overcome her first-week jitters, make a good impression and meet new colleagues at NPR.

Starting a new job? 3 Tips on how to stay confident

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Photo Illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Dear Life Kit: My husband wrote an 80-chapter book. Do I have to read it?

What's more, the letter writer hates her husband's writing style. Should she bite the bullet and read his novel? Or can she pass? Family therapist Kiaundra Jackson offers her two cents.

Dear Life Kit: My husband wrote an 80-chapter book. Do I have to read it?

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Malte Mueller/Getty Images/fStop

3 common thinking traps and how to avoid them, according to a Yale psychologist

Humans have a tendency to make snap judgments and assumptions due to our cognitive biases, says Woo-kyoung Ahn in her book 'Thinking 101.' So how do we fight them?

3 common thinking traps and how to avoid them, according to a Yale psychologist

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Malaka Gharib/NPR

How to show your friends you love them, according to a friendship expert

Psychologist Marisa Franco, author of a new book on the science of making and keeping friends, shares how to deepen the bonds in our platonic relationships.

How to show your friends you love them, according to a friendship expert

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The omicron boosters are here. What you should know about them
Violeta Stoimenova/Getty Images

The omicron boosters are here. What you should know about them

They target the original coronavirus strain and the omicron subvariants causing most of the current infections. And they're available at pharmacies, clinics and doctors' offices around the country. Should you get one? And if so, when?

The omicron boosters are here. What you should know about them

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Photo illustration by Becky Harlan/NPR

Dear Life Kit: I uninvited my sister-in-law from our wedding. Was that wrong of me?

The bride said she was "pissed" because her future sister-in-law was bringing two unauthorized guests. Rachel Wilkerson Miller, editor-in-chief of Self magazine, explains how to smooth things over.

Dear Life Kit: I uninvited my sister-in-law from our wedding. Was that wrong of me?

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