Rethinking Weight Loss For better or worse, people think about their weight. We explain the science of weight and weight loss to help put you on a road to body acceptance — and better health.
Life Kit: Weight Loss
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Rethinking Weight Loss

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For better or worse, people think about their weight. We explain the science of weight and weight loss to help put you on a road to body acceptance — and better health.

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Trust Your Gut: A Beginner's Guide To Intuitive Eating

Knowing when and what to eat may sound simple, but dieting can mess up our connection to hunger cues. The practice of intuitive eating can help people make peace with food.
Here's what to remember:
- Tune in to your hunger signals.
- Think about what foods will make you feel satisfied.
- When you decide how much to eat, trust your body to let you know when it's full.

Trust Your Gut: A Beginner's Guide To Intuitive Eating

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A Saner Mindset For Weight Loss

The way many of us think about weight loss is totally counter-productive. Focus on healthy habits you can sustain instead of the numbers on the scale.
Here's what to remember:
- Forget goal weights. Instead, focus on behavioral goals.
- Start with small changes and let them snowball.
- A loss of only 3% of your body weight can meaningfully improve your health.
- Remember that your best weight is the one you reach when you live the healthiest life you can actually enjoy.

A Saner Mindset For Weight Loss

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If you choose to try to lose weight, make changes that you can live with for the long haul. Shannon Wright for NPR hide caption

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Biology's A B*tch: 5 Reasons It's So Hard To Keep Weight Off

When we shed pounds, we trigger biological mechanisms that make it hard to keep the weight off. Understanding these systems might help you be kinder to your body.
Here's what to remember:
- Metabolism slows when you lose weight.
- If you choose to try to lose weight, make changes that you can live with for the long haul.
- Hormones in your brain conspire to make you hungrier when you lose weight.
- To lose weight, what you eat is more important than how much you exercise.
- But exercise seems to play a big role in maintaining a lower weight.

Biology's A B*tch: 5 Reasons It's So Hard To Keep Weight Off

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Boost Your Body Acceptance For Better Health

We all can feel the effects of weight stigma, no matter what our size. In this episode, we help you feel good about the body you're living in and give strategies to improve your health without obsessing about your weight.
Here's what to remember:
- Recognize that weight stigma can actually harm your physical health.
- Remember that weight and body mass index are imperfect indicators of your health.
- Focus on well-being, regardless of your weight.
- Even if you don't experience weight stigma in daily life, ask yourself: Am I helping to perpetuate it?

Boost Your Body Acceptance For Better Health

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Introduction: Rethinking Weight Loss

For better or worse, people think about their weight. We explain the science of weight and weight loss to help put you on a road to body acceptance — and better health.

Introduction: Rethinking Weight Loss

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