K. L. Ricks for NPR

Bonus: A Strange And Bitter Crop

From the NPR podcast Code Switch: Eighty-five years ago, a crowd of several thousand white people gathered in Jackson County, Fla., to participate in the lynching of a man named Claude Neal. The poet L. Lamar Wilson grew up there, but didn't learn about Claude Neal until he was working on a research paper in high school. When he heard the story, he knew he had to do something.

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The Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Ala., was the scene of the confrontation that became known as Bloody Sunday. William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

A Dangerous Kind Of Self-Delusion

In our final episode, we examine the legacy of the Rev. James Reeb's death. We speak both to his descendants and to those of one of his attackers, exploring how the trauma and the lies that followed it affected both families.

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A car passes by the vacant lot in modern-day Selma where the Silver Moon Cafe stood in 1965. The attack on the Rev. James Reeb occurred just outside the cafe. William Widmer for NPR hide caption

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William Widmer for NPR

Learn Not To Hear It

In Episode 6, we reveal the identity of the fourth man who participated in the attack on the Rev. James Reeb.

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Pallbearers carry the casket of Jimmie Lee Jackson into a church in Marion, Ala., where a sign reads "Racism killed our brother." Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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The X On The Map

In Episode 5, we search for the fourth attacker while digging into the murder of Jimmie Lee Jackson, a black civil rights activist who was murdered in Alabama just weeks before the Rev. James Reeb. Jackson's killer was brought to justice in 2010. We look at his case for strategies to help solve Reeb's.

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Frances Bowden stands in front of Selma Bail Bonds. Chip Brantley/NPR hide caption

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Chip Brantley/NPR

The Sphinx Of Washington Street

In Episode 4, we find a woman who says she knows who killed the Rev. James Reeb, because she was there. She's ready — for the first time in more than 50 years — to tell the truth about what she saw.

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Doctors care for the Rev. James Reeb in a Birmingham, Ala., hospital after he was attacked in Selma on March 9, 1965. Bettmann/Getty Images hide caption

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The Counternarrative

In Episode 3, we break down the conspiracy theory that emerged after the Rev. James Reeb's murder: that he was allowed to die or was killed because the civil rights movement needed a white martyr.

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In court on Dec. 9, 1965, William Stanley Hoggle (from far left), Namon O'Neal Hoggle and Elmer Cook review a street diagram showing where the attack on the Rev. James Reeb occurred in Selma, Ala. The three men were standing trial for the murder of Reeb; all were acquitted. Horace Cort/AP hide caption

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Horace Cort/AP

The Who And The What

In Episode 2, we unravel the aftermath of the Rev. James Reeb's murder: the arrest of three men and the defense brought at trial. We also track down the last living jurors.

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Elmer Cook, William Stanley Hoggle and Namon "Duck" Hoggle (from left to right) were charged with first-degree murder after James Reeb's death and later acquitted at trial. TopFoto/The Image Works hide caption

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TopFoto/The Image Works

The Murder Of The Rev. James Reeb

In 1965, the Rev. James Reeb was murdered in Selma, Ala. No one was ever held to account. We return to the town where it happened, searching for new leads in an old story.

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NPR

Introducing White Lies

A new serialized podcast from NPR investigates a 1965 cold case. New episodes every Tuesday starting May 14.

Introducing White Lies

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