Short Wave New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Emily Kwong for science on a different wavelength.

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Short Wave

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New discoveries, everyday mysteries, and the science behind the headlines — all in about 10 minutes, every weekday. It's science for everyone, using a lot of creativity and a little humor. Join host Emily Kwong for science on a different wavelength.

If you're hooked, try Short Wave Plus. Your subscription supports the show and unlocks a sponsor-free feed. Learn more at plus.npr.org/shortwave

Most Recent Episodes

Honeybees resting on a comb in Stuttgart, Germany. SEBASTIAN GOLLNOW/DPA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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SEBASTIAN GOLLNOW/DPA/AFP via Getty Images

Liquid Gold: The Wonder Of Honey

Honey bees know a lot about honey, and humans are starting to catch up. Scientists are now looking at how the chemicals in honey affect bee health. With the help of research scientist Bernarda Calla, Short Wave producer Berly Mccoy explains the chemical complexities of honey, how it helps keep honey bees resilient, and what role it may play in saving the bees. (encore)

Liquid Gold: The Wonder Of Honey

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When confronted with a spider-like 3-D model, jumping spiders freeze and back away slowly, especially if the model has eyes. Daniela Roessler hide caption

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Daniela Roessler

Spiders Can Fear Other Spiders

If you're not so fond of spiders, you may find kindred spirits in other spiders! Researcher Daniela Roessler worked with jumping spiders and found that they know to get away from the presence of other possible predator spiders, even if they've never encountered them before. She talks with host Maria Godoy about her research and what Halloween decorations do to the poor spiders, if arachnids can have arachnophobia. (Encore)

Spiders Can Fear Other Spiders

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Brachycephalus ephippium. Pumpkin toadlets are native to neotropical rainforests along the Atlantic coast of southeastern Brazil. Walter StaebleinGetty Images hide caption

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Walter StaebleinGetty Images

Against All Odds, The Pumpkin Toadlet Is

Being small has its advantages ... and some limitations. One organism that intimately knows the pros and cons of being mini is the pumpkin toadlet.

Against All Odds, The Pumpkin Toadlet Is

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NPR

Tiny Critters On The Way This Week

Hey, Short Wavers!

Tiny Critters On The Way This Week

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If Monkeys Could Talk...

... Could a monkey host this podcast?

If Monkeys Could Talk...

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The new bacteria, named Thiomargarita magnifica, were discovered on sunken leaves in a Caribbean mangrove swamp. The bacteria, shown here next to a dime, are close to the size of human eyelashes. Tomas Tyml/Tomas Tyml/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL hide caption

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Tomas Tyml/Tomas Tyml/The Regents of the University of California, LBNL

Micro Wave: Scientists Discover GINORMOUS Bacteria

The Caribbean is home to gorgeous beaches, mangroves and ... the biggest bacteria known to humankind. Find out exactly how big from science correspondent Nell Greenfieldboyce in this Micro Wave. Then, stay for the listener mail, where we answer YOUR questions — all hosted by our new senior editor, Gabriel Spitzer!

Micro Wave: Scientists Discover GINORMOUS Bacteria

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The flooding of the Saint John River in 2019 marks the second consecutive year of major flooding. Marc Guitard/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Guitard/Getty Images

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

A majority of people say they have experienced extreme weather in the last five years, according to a nationwide survey conducted by NPR, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Climate Change Is Tough On Personal Finances

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On May 3, 2022, a partnership led by the Yurok Tribe released two California condors, called A2 and A3, into the wild as part of a decades-long conservation effort." Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe hide caption

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Matt Mais/Yurok Tribe

The Quest To Save The California Condor

Historically, the California condor soared across the western skies of North America. But by the 1980s, the bird was on the edge of extinction — just 22 remained.

The Quest To Save The California Condor

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Abortion-rights protesters regroup and protest following Supreme Court's decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, federally protected right to abortion, outside the Supreme Court in Washington on June 24, 2022. The Supreme Court has ended constitutional protections for abortion that had been in place nearly 50 years, a decision by its conservative majority to overturn the court's landmark abortion cases. Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP hide caption

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Gemunu Amarasinghe/AP

The Public Health Implications Of Overturning Roe V. Wade

The Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday. We're revisiting an episode that may give us insight into pregnant people's lives in a post-Roe United States.

The Public Health Implications Of Overturning Roe V. Wade

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A flower crafted by Nell Greenfieldboyce, at an American Society for Microbiology event highlighting agar art. Aidan Rogers/Edvotek hide caption

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Aidan Rogers/Edvotek

Let's Get Crafty With Agar Art!

Pull out your art supplies because it's time to get crafty--with agar! At the intersection of biology and art lies a creative medium that's actually alive. Scientists and artists practice etching designs on petri dishes with bacterial paint that can grow and multiply.

Let's Get Crafty With Agar Art!

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