Consider This from NPR Six days a week, from Monday through Saturday, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. In participating regions on weekdays, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
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Six days a week, from Monday through Saturday, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. In participating regions on weekdays, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

A medical worker puts on a mask before entering a negative pressure room with a COVID-19 patient in the ICU ward at UMass Memorial Medical Center in Worcester, Mass., this month Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

More Vaxxed People Are Acting As If They're 'Done' With The Pandemic. Should They?

More people are hospitalized with COVID than at any point in the pandemic. But the omicron variant is also causing more Americans to tune out the pandemic and turn away from public health measures right when they're needed most. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports.

More Vaxxed People Are Acting As If They're 'Done' With The Pandemic. Should They?

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Voters cast their midterm ballots on Nov. 6, 2018, at Briles Schoolhouse in Peoria Township, Kan. Getty Images hide caption

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How To Fix Declining Trust In Elections And The News Media

Americans' trust in both their government and in each other is declining. That's according to the Pew Research Center, who have been collecting this data for decades.

How To Fix Declining Trust In Elections And The News Media

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Russian tanks take part in training drills in southern Russia this week as Russia rejects Western complaints about its troop buildup near Ukraine. AP hide caption

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AP

Is Russia About To Invade Ukraine? NATO, U.S. Promise 'Massive Consequences'

Secretary of State Antony Blinken says the U.S. is planning "things that we have not done in the past" if Russia invades Ukraine. His comments follow days of diplomatic talks and a deadlock on resolving the crisis brewing along the Ukraine-Russia border, where Russia has massed 100,000 troops with tanks and artillery.

Is Russia About To Invade Ukraine? NATO, U.S. Promise 'Massive Consequences'

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The Polunsky Unit, where death row inmates are held, is pictured on May 21, 2013 in Livingston, Texas, about 40 miles from Huntsville. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

A Texas Prison's Radio Station Helps Incarcerated Men Build Community

The men on death row in Allan B. Polunsky Unit, a maximum security prison in southeastern Texas, spend most of their time in solitary confinement, isolated from each other. Now, a prison radio station is giving them a sense of community and a way to be heard.

A Texas Prison's Radio Station Helps Incarcerated Men Build Community

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Employees of the Miami-Dade Public Library System distribute Covid-19 home rapid test kits in Miami, Florida, on January 8, 2022. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Why COVID Tests Are Still So Scarce And Expensive — And When That Could Change

Many public spaces across the country now require negative COVID-19 tests for entry. But the cost of testing can vary widely, and some say they have had to spend hundreds of dollars to purchase tests.

Why COVID Tests Are Still So Scarce And Expensive — And When That Could Change

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Sen. Raphael Warnock, D-GA, says that if Congress doesn't pass voting legislation, it will have "failed in the trust the people have given us." AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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AFP via Getty Images

Senator Raphael Warnock Wants You To See Voting Rights As A Moral Issue

As Democrats are making a push for voting rights legislation in Congress, more faith leaders want Americans to approach it as a moral – even spiritual – issue, including pastor and Democrat, Sen. Raphael Warnock of Georgia.

Senator Raphael Warnock Wants You To See Voting Rights As A Moral Issue

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A sign on the fence outside of Lowell elementary school was meant to welcome students back after their holiday break but the Chicago teacher's union voted last week to return to virtual learning, citing unsafe conditions in the schools as the Omicron variant of the coronavirus continues to spread. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Omicron Has Schools And Parents Scrambling. How Are They Coping?

A surge in COVID-19 cases fueled by the Omicron variant has meant many school districts across the country have considered or committed to returning to remote learning for the time being.

Omicron Has Schools And Parents Scrambling. How Are They Coping?

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The architect: Maverick Carter. Photo illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR hide caption

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Photo illustration by Renee Klahr/NPR

BONUS: Maverick Carter On Building The LeBron James Empire

Before they built one of the biggest athlete-driven business empires in the world, LeBron James and Maverick Carter were just two kids from Akron, Ohio.

BONUS: Maverick Carter On Building The LeBron James Empire

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CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said in an interview with NPR on Wednesday that the nation is fighting headwinds in the fight to end the pandemic from new variants of the virus and efforts to rollback coronavirus restrictions. AP hide caption

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AP

How To Build Public Trust When Fighting A Pandemic

If you're confused about the new CDC Coronavirus guidelines, you're not alone.

How To Build Public Trust When Fighting A Pandemic

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The Premier League soccer team Newcastle United was purchased by a Saudi-led investment in the fall. AP hide caption

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AP

Countries Accused Of Human Rights Abuses Are Pouring Money Into Soccer

A new owner can change everything for a professional sports team. And in the world of professional soccer, more and more of those new owners are countries accused of human rights abuses.

Countries Accused Of Human Rights Abuses Are Pouring Money Into Soccer

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