Consider This from NPR Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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Consider This from NPR

From NPR

Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

An employee takes a pile of chairs inside a closing bar on the Place du Capitole in Toulouse, France on Saturday. Coronavirus cases in the country just topped a million, and there's a new government-imposed curfew. In large parts of the France you can't be out after 9 p.m. Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Fred Scheiber/AFP via Getty Images

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging Past The Summer Peak — And Not Just In The U.S.

The U.S. looks poised to exceed its summer peak, when the country averaged as many as 65,000 cases a day for a 10-day stretch in late July. The seven-day average of cases is now more than 69,000, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

Coronavirus Cases Are Surging Past The Summer Peak — And Not Just In The U.S.

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Passengers queue at the American Airlines counter at Ronald Reagan National Airport on Sept. 17. Coronavirus cases are surging across the country as the holiday season approaches, leaving many families with questions about traveling to gather together. Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Daniel Slim/AFP via Getty Images

As COVID-19 Cases Climb, How Safe Is It To Go Home For The Holidays?

On Friday, the U.S. hit its highest number of daily coronavirus cases since the pandemic began. Holiday travel could lead to even more drastic and deadly spikes.

Ryan and Jennifer Montano search through the remains of their Vacaville, Calif., home, destroyed in the LNU Lightning Complex Fire in August. Lauren Sommer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Sommer/NPR

How Much Do You Really Know About Your Flood Or Wildfire Risk?

Every year, millions of American renters and homebuyers make decisions about where to live. They have a lot of information to help them make a decision — about everything from schools to public transit to lead paint.

How Much Do You Really Know About Your Flood Or Wildfire Risk?

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Supporters wait to greet Democratic U.S. presidential nominee Joe Biden at Greensburg Amtrak Station September 30 in Greensburg, Pennsylvania. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Why More White Voters Aren't Supporting President Trump In 2020

Polls show that Joe Biden has strong support among white voters with a college degree, especially white women, young voters, and those who live in cities and suburbs.

Why More White Voters Aren't Supporting President Trump In 2020

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Passengers wear face masks at Tocumen International Airport in Panama City on Oct. 12. STR/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP via Getty Images

From Air Travel to Hospital Treatment, We're Still Learning About The Virus

Francis Collins, director of the National Institutes of Health, told NPR this week that he's "guardedly optimistic" about the prospects of a coronavirus vaccine being approved by the end of the year.

From Air Travel to Hospital Treatment, We're Still Learning About The Virus

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Voters drop off their ballots at an official ballot drop-box in Orange County, Calif., earlier this month. More than 35 million people have already cast their votes, with two weeks to go before Election Day. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

Election FAQs: Postmark Deadlines, Ballot Security And How To Track Your Vote

With two weeks until election day and more than 35 million votes already cast, NPR's Miles Parks and Pam Fessler answer your questions about voting, ballots and election security.

Election FAQs: Postmark Deadlines, Ballot Security And How To Track Your Vote

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More than 1,000,000 Americans left the workforce in September. About 80% of them were women. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

Women are dropping out of the workforce in much higher numbers than men. Valerie Wilson of the Economic Policy Institute explains that women are overrepresented in jobs that have been hit hardest by the pandemic and child care has gotten harder to come by.

The Economy Is Driving Women Out Of The Workforce And Some May Not Return

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Tourists line up to go up the Yellow Crane Tower in Wuhan, China, earlier this month. As there have been no recorded cases of community transmission in Wuhan since May, life for residents is gradually returning to normal. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

The Pandemic Bounceback Abroad: Concerts And Movies In Other Countries

While U.S. movie theaters continue to struggle, the picture is better for the international box office. NPR's Bob Mondello, who's reported on how domestic theaters are getting by, explains why things look more promising abroad.

The Pandemic Bounceback Abroad: Concerts And Movies In Other Countries

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, says Thanksgiving gatherings could cause coronavirus cases to rise even faster than they already are. Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Graeme Jennings/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

Pandemic 'Halftime': U.S. Looks At Lessons Learned As Fall & Holidays Near

As cases spike around the country, Utah is one state changing the way it's approaching the coronavirus. Republican Gov. Gary Herbert has a "new game plan" to beat back record-high cases that threaten to overwhelm the state's hospital system.

Pandemic 'Halftime': U.S. Looks At Lessons Learned As Fall & Holidays Near

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Supreme Court nominee Judge Amy Coney Barrett testifies on the third day of her confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. Drew Angerer/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

The Politics At Play In Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Confirmation Hearings

With less than three weeks to go until Election Day, Republicans have the votes to confirm Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court. Her confirmation hearing is now much about the politics of the election.

The Politics At Play In Judge Amy Coney Barrett's Confirmation Hearings

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