Consider This from NPR Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
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Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

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BONUS: 'Nina' And 'Just Us' Offer Ways To Start A Conversation On Race

After the protests last year, we heard the phrase "racial reckoning" a lot, as some groups of people struggled to catch up with what's just been reality for many others. On this episode of NPR's new Book of the Day podcast, we've got two books that might help you reckon with that reckoning, in two different ways: Traci Todd and illustrator Christian Robinson's bright and powerful picture book biography Nina: A Story of Nina Simone and poet Claudia Rankine's Just Us: An American Conversation, in which she puts together poetry, essays and images to bring readers into an uncomfortable but necessary conversation about race.

BONUS: 'Nina' And 'Just Us' Offer Ways To Start A Conversation On Race

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North Dakota ranchers have been forced to sell off close to 25% more of their herds over last year. NPR hide caption

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NPR

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures As Water Runs Short In The West

Large parts of the West have been hot and dry for so long that reservoirs are running low and some communities are mandating conservation. California is talking about a statewide mandate, too. Meanwhile, farmers are preparing to flood their fields to replenish aquifers, while ranchers are selling off parts of their herds and worried about feeding the rest.

Desperate Times, Desperate Measures As Water Runs Short In The West

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Women rights activists hold up signs as they gather in Washington, DC. to protest the new abortion law in Texas. While she was instrumental to the early abortion-rights movement, many in the crown may not have known the name Pat Maginnis. Getty Images hide caption

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Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

Patricia Maginnis, who was 93 when she died on August 30, may have been the first person to publicly call for abortion to be completely decriminalized in America. Despite her insistence on direct action on abortion-rights at a time when many were uncomfortable even saying the word "abortion," Maginnis is not a bold letter name of the movement. That may be because she didn't seek the limelight and she cared more for action then self-presentation.

Remembering an Abortion Rights Activist Who Spurned the Spotlight

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Ethiopia's Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed, right, First Lady Zinash Tayachew, center, and Djibouti's President Ismail Omar Guelleh, left, attend Abiy's inauguration ceremony after he was sworn in for a second five-year term, in the capital Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Monday, Oct. 4, 2021. AP hide caption

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AP

Social Media Misinformation Stokes A Worsening Civil War In Ethiopia

Hate and division on Facebook are not just a problem in the U.S. That's one of the messages whistleblower Frances Haugen took to Congress last week, where she accused Facebook's algorithms of quote, "literally fanning ethnic violence in Ethiopia," a country that's endured nearly a year of civil war.

Social Media Misinformation Stokes A Worsening Civil War In Ethiopia

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Women wait outside an Apple store as it prepared for its grand opening in Beijing in July 2020. Despite increased U.S.-China tensions, including trade friction, the world's two largest economies still have one of the world's largest trading relationships. AP hide caption

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AP

Is China A Threat Or An Opportunity?

In many parts of the U.S., China remains a huge business opportunity despite recent friction. That's the country where Apple makes its phones and Nike stitches its shoes. Yet inside the Washington Beltway, China is a security threat. Full stop. It's one of the few things Democrats, Republicans and most everyone else in the capital agree on.

Is China A Threat Or An Opportunity?

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Dustin Milligan, Ed Helms, Sierra Teller Ornelas, Jesse Leigh, Tai Leclaire and Kimberly Guerrero arrive at the Peacock Series "Rutherford Falls" partnership with The Autry of the American West to celebrate Native American storytelling event at the Autry Museum of the American West on June 26, 2021 in Los Angeles, California. Getty Images hide caption

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Native Americans Take Over The Writers' Room and Tell Their Own Stories

After decades of Indigenous stories told by non-Natives, two shows from this past year signal a change.

Native Americans Take Over The Writers' Room and Tell Their Own Stories

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Thirty-five years ago, Janet Jackson released an album that changed the course of her career, and of pop music. Blake Cale for NPR hide caption

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Blake Cale for NPR

BONUS: Janet Jackson Once Had 'Control' of the Charts

Thirty-five years ago, Janet Jackson released an album that changed the course of her career, and of pop music. Control took over radio, reinvented the playbook for Black artists crossing over into pop and ushered in a whole new sound for R&B.

BONUS: Janet Jackson Once Had 'Control' of the Charts

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R. Kelly appears during a hearing at the Leighton Criminal Courthouse in Chicago in September 2019. Getty Images hide caption

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R. Kelly, Britney Spears, And The Rise Of 'Consequence Culture'

Last month, R&B singer R. Kelly was found guilty of racketeering and sex trafficking. Days later, a judge suspended Jamie Spears as the conservator of his daughter Britney Spears' estate. While these cases are completely unrelated, they do have one crucial thing in common: a massive online following, and an ecosystem of think pieces and documentaries that fuel conversation online.

R. Kelly, Britney Spears, And The Rise Of 'Consequence Culture'

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Former Facebook employee and whistleblower Frances Haugen testifies during a Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation hearing on Capitol Hill, October 05, 2021 in Washington, DC. Getty Images hide caption

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For Facebook, A Week Of Upheaval Unlike Any Other

One day after a worldwide outage on multiple of its platforms, Facebook was accused by a whistleblower of hiding concerns about its products from the public and its shareholders. Both crises reveal the same thing: just how powerful Facebook is on a global scale.

For Facebook, A Week Of Upheaval Unlike Any Other

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Evidence seized from a drug trafficking operation in central California in early 2020 included methamphetamine and fentanyl with a street value of $1.5 million, authorities said. Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP hide caption

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Tulare County Sheriff's Office via AP

America's Other Drug Crisis: New Efforts To Fight A Surge In Meth

Meth-related overdoses have tripled in recent years. In the west, 70 percent of police departments identify meth as their biggest problem. Now one state — California — is on the brink of implementing a major new treatment program that would pay drug users to stay clean. KQED's April Dembosky reports.

America's Other Drug Crisis: New Efforts To Fight A Surge In Meth

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