Consider This from NPR Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, Kelly McEvers and the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered — Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro — help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR.

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Consider This from NPR

From NPR

Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, Kelly McEvers and the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered — Ailsa Chang, Audie Cornish, Mary Louise Kelly and Ari Shapiro — help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR.

Most Recent Episodes

A masked patron's reflection is seen in a plexiglass partition, as other patrons chat inside Bar Tonique in New Orleans, Thursday, July 9, 2020. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP

The Patchwork Pandemic Continues As New States Approach A 'Danger Point'

First New York, then the Sun Belt. Now, new states like Illinois and Mississippi are urging residents to wear masks and take the virus more seriously.

The Patchwork Pandemic Continues As New States Approach A 'Danger Point'

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A father and daughter adjust their face masks at a peaceful Black Lives Matter protest outside of the White House on June 12. Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah Silbiger/Getty Images

Americans Want To Go Back To Normal, But 'Normal' Is What Got Us Here

After rising for weeks, the rate of daily COVID-19 cases in the U.S. has started to level off. But now, just as we saw in the spring, the country is facing a spike in deaths.

Americans Want To Go Back To Normal, But 'Normal' Is What Got Us Here

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Children in a pre-school class wear masks and sit at desks spaced apart during summer school sessions in Monterey Park, California. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

The Virus Is Out Of Control, And Kids Are Headed Back To School Anyway

Millions of students are getting ready to head back to school. Some already have. NPR's Anya Kamentez reports on what happens when positive cases crop up — as they inevitably will.

The Virus Is Out Of Control, And Kids Are Headed Back To School Anyway

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Voters a polling station for a special election in Santa Clarita, California on May 12. Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP via Getty Images

Slow Mail, Misinformation, And The Pandemic: What Could Go Wrong On Election Day 2020

Rosa Brooks, law professor at Georgetown University, recently helped organize an experiment to game out what might happen if the winner on election night isn't immediately clear. She explains what she found.

Slow Mail, Misinformation, And The Pandemic: What Could Go Wrong On Election Day 2020

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A healthcare worker zips up a protective barrier in the Covid-19 Unit at United Memorial Medical Center in Houston on July 2. Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Felix/AFP via Getty Images

The U.S. Has Lost Control Of The Coronavirus. What Now?

The spread of the virus exceeds our capacity to test, contact trace, and isolate those who test positive. Some public health experts say the only option that remains is a second shutdown. NPR's Rob Stein reports on what that would look like.

The U.S. Has Lost Control Of The Coronavirus. What Now?

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, Google CEO Sundar Pichai, and Apple CEO Tim Cook are sworn-in before the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Antitrust, Commercial and Administrative Law. MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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MANDEL NGAN/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

In The Pandemic, Big Tech Is Bigger Than Ever. Should Consumers Be Worried?

The CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google faced questions today from a House subcommittee. Some lawmakers believe those companies have too much economic and political power. Former Facebook policy executive Dipayan Ghosh agrees.

In The Pandemic, Big Tech Is Bigger Than Ever. Should Consumers Be Worried?

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The body of Rep. John Lewis lies in state in the Capitol Rotunda. Matt McClain/AP hide caption

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Matt McClain/AP

John Lewis Fought For Voting Rights His Entire Life. Why His Work Is Still Unfinished

John Lewis, the civil rights icon and late congressman from Georgia who represented Atlanta for more than three decades, spent his life fighting for equal voting rights in America.

John Lewis Fought For Voting Rights His Entire Life. Why His Work Is Still Unfinished

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Moderna headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Maddie Meyer/Getty Images hide caption

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Maddie Meyer/Getty Images

First Phase III Vaccine Trial Underway, Government Seeks Thousands Of Volunteers

This morning in Savannah, Georgia, the first volunteer was injected in a phase-three vaccine trial administered by Moderna and the National Institutes of Health. Dr Anthony Fauci hopes that up to 15,000 volunteers will be in place by the end of the week. (Tens of thousands more will be needed for additional vaccine trials.)

First Phase III Vaccine Trial Underway, Government Seeks Thousands Of Volunteers

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Resident's and activists camped out in solidarity with the homeless residents of Camp Lakay Nou in Philadelphia, PA. Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Expanded Unemployment Set To Expire; Americans Face 'Utterly Preventable' Evictions

More than 25 million Americans have been receiving expanded federal unemployment benefits — $600 a week. Those benefits disappear in days.

Expanded Unemployment Set To Expire; Americans Face 'Utterly Preventable' Evictions

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Protesters display the letters "BLM" for Black Lives Matter and the face of George Floyd on a monument to Confederate General Robert E. Lee in Richmond, VA on June 18, 2020. Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Zach D Roberts/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Fight Over Confederate Statues, And How They Could Tell Another Story

Monument Avenue is a large, tree-lined street in Richmond, Virginia that used to have several confederate statues and monuments. In the wake of protests against racism and police brutality, the city has removed most of them. But a monument of Robert E. Lee still stands — for now.

The Fight Over Confederate Statues, And How They Could Tell Another Story

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