Consider This from NPR Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

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Consider This from NPR

From NPR

Make sense of the day. Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of All Things Considered help you consider the major stories of the day in less than 15 minutes, featuring the reporting and storytelling resources of NPR. In participating regions, you'll also hear a local news segment that will help you make sense of what's going on in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

A new generation of states are wrestling with how to legalize marijuana with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

America's Next Generation Of Legal Marijuana: New State Laws Focus On Racial Equity

It's been almost a decade since Washington and Colorado became the first states in America to legalize recreational marijuana. Now a new generation of states are wrestling with how to do it with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts.

America's Next Generation Of Legal Marijuana: New State Laws Focus On Racial Equity

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has plans to create a commission similar to the one after the Sept. 11 attacks, to investigate how Trump supporters were able to breach the Capitol complex on Jan. 6. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

The Challenge To Stop The Next Outbreak Of Homegrown, Extremist Violence In The U.S.

Just because the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is done, it doesn't mean the story of what happened on Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol is over.

The Challenge To Stop The Next Outbreak Of Homegrown, Extremist Violence In The U.S.

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Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

America's Energy Future: How Gas Companies Are Fighting To Block Climate Rules

Natural gas utilities face a bleak future in a world increasingly concerned about climate change. An NPR investigation shows how they work to block local climate action and protect their business.

America's Energy Future: How Gas Companies Are Fighting To Block Climate Rules

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Anne Cook sits with her husband, Jack Cook, as he receives his second dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine during a mass vaccination event in the parking lot of Coors Field on Saturday in Denver, Colo. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Optimism About Case Rates, Vaccines, And Future Of The Pandemic

After more than 500,000 deaths and nearly a full year, experts say there are a growing number of reasons to be optimistic about the direction of the pandemic. Cases, hospitalizations and deaths have all fallen dramatically in recent weeks.

Optimism About Case Rates, Vaccines, And Future Of The Pandemic

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A protester carries a sign that reads "Defund The Police" during the Black Women Matter "Say Her Name" march last July in Richmond, Va. Eze Amos/Getty Images hide caption

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Eze Amos/Getty Images

Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

Last summer, the city of Austin, Texas, slashed the budget for its police department. More recently, the city council voted on a new way to spend some of that money. KUT reporter Audrey McGlinchy explains what other changes have taken place in Austin.

Update On A Movement: How 'Defunding Police' Is Playing Out In Austin, Texas

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Dwane Day throws flowers onto the casket of Bishop James N. Flowers Jr., the pastor of the Shining Star Freewill Baptist church, on April 13, 2020. Bishop Flowers passed away after contracting COVID-19. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

BONUS: Why 500,000 COVID-19 Deaths May Not Feel Any Different

Why is it so hard to feel the difference between 400,000 and 500,000 COVID-19 deaths — and how might that impact our decision making during the pandemic?

BONUS: Why 500,000 COVID-19 Deaths May Not Feel Any Different

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Chris Duncan, whose 75-year-old mother Constance died from COVID-19 on her birthday, photographs a COVID-19 Memorial Project installation of 20,000 American flags on the National Mall as the United States crosses the 200,000 lives lost in the COVID-19 pandemic on Sept. 22, 2020 in Washington, D.C. The U.S. will likely cross the mark of half a million lives lost to COVID-19 in the coming days. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Memorializing The Deaths Of More Than 500,000 Americans Lost To COVID-19

The U.S. death toll from COVID-19 is on track to pass a number next week that once seemed unthinkable: Half a million people in this country dead from the coronavirus.

Memorializing The Deaths Of More Than 500,000 Americans Lost To COVID-19

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Pike Electric service trucks line up after a snowstorm on Tuesday in Fort Worth, Texas. Millions across the state have been without power, water or both, following historic low temperatures brought by winter weather. Ron Jenkins/Getty Images hide caption

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Ron Jenkins/Getty Images

Texas Is Defined By Energy. How Did The State's Power Grid Fail So Massively?

Millions of people in Texas have gone three or more days without power, water or both. Texas has had winter weather before, so what went so wrong this time?

Texas Is Defined By Energy. How Did The State's Power Grid Fail So Massively?

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Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell walks to the Senate chamber on the third day of former President Donald Trump's second impeachment trial last Thursday. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Impeachment Fallout At Home And Abroad: GOP Fractured, America 'Tarnished'

After the Senate vote failed to convict former President Donald Trump, a clearer picture of the political consequences is emerging — both for the Republican party and for the United States on the world stage.

Impeachment Fallout At Home And Abroad: GOP Fractured, America 'Tarnished'

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Elvin Toro, 26, a former army medic, organizes his syringes before giving out the next dose of a COVID-19 vaccine to a local in Central Falls, R.I., on Saturday. Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Prezioso/AFP via Getty Images

The Intensifying Race Between Coronavirus Variants And Vaccines

There's evidence of at least seven U.S. variants of the coronavirus, while another that emerged from the U.K. is poised to become the dominant strain here by the end of March. One adviser from the Food and Drug Administration tells NPR there's a tipping point to watch for: when a fully vaccinated person winds up hospitalized with a coronavirus variant.

The Intensifying Race Between Coronavirus Variants And Vaccines

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