Consider This from NPR The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.

Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis

Consider This from NPR

From NPR

The hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. New episodes six days a week, Sunday through Friday.

Support NPR and get your news sponsor-free with Consider This+. Learn more at plus.npr.org/considerthis

Most Recent Episodes

An Amazon worker in New York moves boxes on Amazon Prime Day (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images) Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

"De-influencers" Ring The Alarm On The Environmental Impacts Of Overconsumption

In the last few years, a new trend has emerged on social media: De-influencers.

"De-influencers" Ring The Alarm On The Environmental Impacts Of Overconsumption

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910494/1233765970" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

People flee after shots were fired near the Kansas City Chiefs' Super Bowl LVIII victory celebration on February 14, 2024, in Kansas City, Missouri. (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS / AFP) (Photo by ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images) ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
ANDREW CABALLERO-REYNOLDS/AFP via Getty Images

Kansas City Communities Continue Block By Block Efforts To Prevent Violence

In Kansas City neighborhood organizations do the work of violence prevention one block, and one person at at time.

Kansas City Communities Continue Block By Block Efforts To Prevent Violence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910484/1233619056" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

A television screen shows President Volodymyr Zelensky's addressing Russians the day Russia invaded Ukraine February 24, 2022. Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Igor Golovniov/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Boredom Followed By Unexpected Tragedy: A Ukrainian Soldier's Life At War

Quote – "The fight is here; I need ammunition, not a ride." That statement, from Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to the U-S Embassy, came two days after Russian missiles began raining down on his country two years ago.

Boredom Followed By Unexpected Tragedy: A Ukrainian Soldier's Life At War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910472/1233285145" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A wind turbine is seen near Pinnacle Wind Farm in Keyser, West Virginia. This onetime coal town is emblematic of a nation-wide attempt to shift to renewable energy. Haiyun Jiang/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Haiyun Jiang/NPR

Wind Power Is Taking Over A West Virginia Coal Town. Will The Residents Embrace It?

Keyser, West Virginia, was once known for coal. But the jobs have been disappearing. First because of automation, then cheap natural gas. And now, the urgency to address climate change is one more pressure on this energy source that contributes to global warming.

Wind Power Is Taking Over A West Virginia Coal Town. Will The Residents Embrace It?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910463/1232958322" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Drug consumers line up outside of the SAOM van for a methadone cocktail and supplies in the city center of Porto, Portugal last spring. There are very few overdose deaths in the country where drug addiction is treated as an illness rather than a crime. Photo by Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Photo by Demetrius Freeman/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Does Portugal Have The Answer To Stopping Drug Overdose Deaths?

Brian Mann covers the U-S opioid and fentanyl crisis for NPR. That means he talks to a lot of people struggling with addiction. Again and again, he's heard stories of people who have succumbed to their addiction — last year 112, 000 — more than ever in history.

Does Portugal Have The Answer To Stopping Drug Overdose Deaths?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910452/1232748585" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Flowers lay next to a picture of late Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny at a makeshift memorial organized at the monument to the victims of political repressions in Saint Petersburg. OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
OLGA MALTSEVA/AFP via Getty Images

What Navalny's Death Means For The Russian Opposition

Much of the world has spent the weekend mourning Russian opposition leader Alexei Navalny. And asking why he chose to return to Russia, after he'd been poisoned, and when it was clear he was in danger.

What Navalny's Death Means For The Russian Opposition

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910443/1232529831" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Wind turbines are visible from the highway in Atlantic City, New Jersey. The state and the country are betting big on offshore wind power as a means to combat climate change. Rachel Wisniewski/For the Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rachel Wisniewski/For the Washington Post/Getty Images

A Second Wind For Wind Power?

About two years ago, New Jersey's Democratic Governor Phil Murphy said that the state would be partnering with the Danish company Orsted, the largest developer of offshore wind projects in the world.

A Second Wind For Wind Power?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910433/1232341973" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A "for rent" sign in front of a home in December 2023 in Miami, Florida. The price of rental properties began skyrocketing in 2020. They've come down a small amount, but studies show people across incomes are spending huge parts of their income on rent, leaving little left for other expenses. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Rents Take A Big Bite

Rent has skyrocketed in the United States. That means Americans are handing over a bigger portion of their paycheck to their housing costs. They have less money for things like food, electricity, and commuting.

Rents Take A Big Bite

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910421/1232155843" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A souvenir shopkeeper displays Matryoshka dolls featuring Russian President Vladimir Putin and former US presidents, including Donald Trump in Moscow. In recent years the one-time party of Reagan and current party of Trump has shown an increasing admiration of Russia and Vladimir Putin. Misha Friedman/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Misha Friedman/Getty Images

The Romance Between The American Right, Russia And Putin

For half a century, during the Cold War, every U-S president painted Russia as the dominant threat. America's ideological opposite, a hostile and nuclear-armed power. Ronald Reagan went so far as to call the Soviet Union an Evil Empire.

The Romance Between The American Right, Russia And Putin

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910412/1231869783" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic U.S. House candidate Tom Suozzi celebrates his victory in the special election to replace Republican Rep. George Santos on Tuesday night. Suozzi defeated Republican Mazi Pilip in large part because he was willing to take issues like immigration head on. Stephanie Keith/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Stephanie Keith/Getty Images

Immigration: A Winning Issue For Democrats?

One single election does not a trend make. But does Democrat Tom Suozzi's victory in the special election for New York's 3rd Congressional District mean something bigger for democrats?

Immigration: A Winning Issue For Democrats?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1198910401/1231555477" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
or search npr.org