Consider This from NPR Six days a week, from Monday through Saturday, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. In participating regions on weekdays, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
Consider This Logo
NPR

Consider This from NPR

From NPR

Six days a week, from Monday through Saturday, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you, in 15 minutes. In participating regions on weekdays, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

A cardboard cutout of former U.S. President Donald Trump is seen at a campaign event for former U.S. senator and Republican gubernatorial candidate David Perdue on February 1, 2022 in Dalton, Georgia. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Georgia's GOP Primaries, Where Trump's 'Big Lie' Is On The Ballot

It's 2022, but the 2020 election is on the ballot in Georgia, where several Trump-backed candidates are running in Republican primary races.

Georgia's GOP Primaries, Where Trump's 'Big Lie' Is On The Ballot

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100675274/1100846246" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A makeshift memorial for the dozens of Indigenous children who died more than a century ago while attending a boarding school that was once located nearby is displayed under a tree at a public park in Albuquerque, N.M., in 2021. AP hide caption

toggle caption
AP

Investigating The Tragic History Of Federal Indian Boarding Schools

Last year the remains of 215 children were found in unmarked graves on the site of a former residential school for Indigenous children in British Columbia. The news was shocking, but among Indigenous people of Canada and survivors of the country's boarding school system, it was not a surprise. For generations there had been stories of children taken away from their parents never to be heard from again. Those who did return told of neglect, abuse, and forced assimilation.

Investigating The Tragic History Of Federal Indian Boarding Schools

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1093809980/1100437605" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Russian President Vladimir Putin chairs a Security Council meeting via a video link at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow on May 20, 2022. SPUTNIK/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
SPUTNIK/AFP via Getty Images

How A Possible NATO Expansion Shows Russia's Plans are Backfiring

Russian President Vladimir Putin has used possible NATO expansion to justify invading Ukraine. Now, that invasion might expand the alliance. Finland and Sweden, both formerly neutral Russian neighbors, are applying for membership.

How A Possible NATO Expansion Shows Russia's Plans are Backfiring

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100371791/1100492771" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students listen to a teacher during a lesson at Poland's Warsaw Ukrainian School, on Wednesday, May 11, 2022. Adam Lach for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Adam Lach for NPR

They Fled The Most Traumatized Parts of Ukraine. Classrooms Are Offering Them Hope

A Polish school in Warsaw has taken in Ukrainian refugee students and teachers. The school provides safety and a place of hope as the war between Russia and Ukraine continues.

They Fled The Most Traumatized Parts of Ukraine. Classrooms Are Offering Them Hope

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1100202479/1100263308" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman shops for baby formula at Target in Annapolis, Maryland, on May 16, 2022, as a nationwide shortage of baby formula continues due to supply chain crunches tied to the coronavirus pandemic that have already strained the country's formula stock, an issue that was further exacerbated by a major product recall in February. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

A Formula Shortage Shows How Policy, Societal Pressure Impact Babies & Parents

This week, the FDA announced new steps to ease a nationwide baby formula shortage prompted, in part, by a temporary shutdown of a facility that makes formula back in February.

A Formula Shortage Shows How Policy, Societal Pressure Impact Babies & Parents

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099852517/1099906960" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Flags at the base of the Washington Monument fly at half staff to mark one 1 million deaths attributed to COVID-19. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

How Many Of America's One Million COVID Deaths Were Preventable?

As the U.S. marks one million people dead from COVID-19, scientists suggest that nearly one third of those deaths could have been prevented if more people had chosen to be vaccinated. NPR's Selena Simmons-Duffin reports.

How Many Of America's One Million COVID Deaths Were Preventable?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099290062/1099610606" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mourners gather near Tops Grocery store in Buffalo, New York, on May 15, 2022. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

Buffalo Shooting Victims Are Likely Targets Of Racist 'Replacement' Violence

A man accused of killing 10 people in Buffalo, New York was allegedly motivated by a racist doctrine known as 'replacement theory.' It's just a new name for an old set of racial hatreds, Kathleen Belew told NPR. Belew is an assistant professor of history at the University of Chicago and the author of Bring The War Home: The White Power Movement And Paramilitary America.

Buffalo Shooting Victims Are Likely Targets Of Racist 'Replacement' Violence

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1099118856/1099317549" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The United States is experiencing an adolescent mental health crisis. According to a CDC report, in 2019, 1 in 6 young people reported creating a suicide plan. That's a 44 percent increase since 2009. AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
AFP via Getty Images

The Children's Mental Health Crisis Didn't Start With The Pandemic

The United States is experiencing an adolescent mental health crisis. Experts from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to the Surgeon General are stressing the urgent need to address the mental health needs of children and teens.

The Children's Mental Health Crisis Didn't Start With The Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1093807610/1098969403" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A food lover faces an unimaginable choice: Give up her stomach or risk a fatal cancer. NPR hide caption

toggle caption
NPR

Genetic Testing: Is It Better Not To Know?

Sasa Woodruff loves food—she's been accused of having far too many cookbooks. But in 2019, a phone call from an unknown caller changed her relationship to eating.

Genetic Testing: Is It Better Not To Know?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098550511/1098852670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A sign displays gas prices at a gas station on May 10 in Chicago, Illinois. Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Getty Images

Inflation Is Still High. Why That Hits Low-Income Americans Hardest.

Inflation dipped slightly in April, but it's still at a historically-high 8.3 percent. Research suggests lower-income families suffer the most when prices rise.

Inflation Is Still High. Why That Hits Low-Income Americans Hardest.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1098478108/1098603350" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
or search npr.org