Consider This from NPR Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
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Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

Colombian President Iván Duque unveiled a program last month that will allow undocumented Venezuelan migrants to legally live and work in Colombia for up to 10 years. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Colombia Welcomes Venezuelan Refugees With Open Arms: Will The U.S. Do The Same?

Colombian President Iván Duque won praise from the United Nations, Pope Francis and the Biden administration with his recent announcement that Colombia would welcome Venezuelan refugees with open arms — providing protected status, work permits and legal residency for up to 10 years.

Colombia Welcomes Venezuelan Refugees With Open Arms: Will The U.S. Do The Same?

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CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said in an interview with NPR on Wednesday that the nation is fighting headwinds in the effort to end the pandemic from new variants of the virus and state rollbacks of coronavirus restrictions. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Pandemic Inflection Point: Drop In Cases Stalls, States Loosen Public Health Measures

In the U.S., the rollout of COVID-19 vaccines is improving every day, but hundreds of millions of people are still vulnerable. And now, with some states relaxing or eliminating public health measures altogether, many people live in places where the virus will be freer to spread unchecked.

Pandemic Inflection Point: Drop In Cases Stalls, States Loosen Public Health Measures

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Stacey Abrams speaks at a rally in Atlanta for then-Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Nov. 2, 2020. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Stacey Abrams On The Continuing Fight For Voter Access

The Supreme Court heard arguments this week about voting laws in Arizona that would make ballot access harder for people living in rural areas like the Navajo Nation. NPR's Nina Totenberg reports that the conservative court isn't likely to strike down the laws which could pave the way for more legislation that cuts into future election turnout.

Stacey Abrams On The Continuing Fight For Voter Access

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False conspiracy theories have always been a part of U.S. history, but experts say they're spreading faster and wider than ever before. Matt Williams for NPR hide caption

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Matt Williams for NPR

The Growing Threat Of Disinformation And How To 'Deprogram' People Who Believe It

Disinformation isn't new. But in the last decade, the growth of social media has made it easier than ever to spread. That coincided with the political rise of Donald Trump, who rose to power on a wave of disinformation and exited the White House in similar fashion.

The Growing Threat Of Disinformation And How To 'Deprogram' People Who Believe It

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Avril Haines, then-nominee for director of national intelligence, testifies at her confirmation hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Jan. 19 in Washington, D.C. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Pool/Getty Images

Post-Trump, New U.S. Intel Chief Seeks To Rebuild Trust — And Fight Domestic Terror

Director of National Intelligence Avril Haines has taken over after a turbulent time. Former President Donald Trump was frequently at odds with the American intelligence community, including some of his hand-picked intel chiefs.

Post-Trump, New U.S. Intel Chief Seeks To Rebuild Trust — And Fight Domestic Terror

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Joelle Avelino NPR hide caption

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NPR

BONUS: The Man Behind the March on Washington

Bayard Rustin, the man behind the March on Washington, was one of the most consequential architects of the civil rights movement you may never have heard of. Rustin imagined how nonviolent civil resistance could be used to dismantle segregation in the United States. He organized around the idea for years and eventually introduced it to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. But his identity as a gay man made him a target, obscured his rightful status and made him feel forced to choose, again and again, which aspect of his identity was most important.

BONUS: The Man Behind the March on Washington

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A new generation of states are wrestling with how to legalize marijuana with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

America's Next Generation Of Legal Marijuana: New State Laws Focus On Racial Equity

It's been almost a decade since Washington and Colorado became the first states in America to legalize recreational marijuana. Now a new generation of states are wrestling with how to do it with a focus on racial equity that was missing from early legalization efforts.

America's Next Generation Of Legal Marijuana: New State Laws Focus On Racial Equity

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House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has plans to create a commission similar to the one after the Sept. 11 attacks, to investigate how Trump supporters were able to breach the Capitol complex on Jan. 6. Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Roberto Schmidt/AFP via Getty Images

The Challenge To Stop The Next Outbreak Of Homegrown, Extremist Violence In The U.S.

Just because the second impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump is done, it doesn't mean the story of what happened on Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol is over.

The Challenge To Stop The Next Outbreak Of Homegrown, Extremist Violence In The U.S.

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Tyler Hollon, who works for a construction company in Utah, says eliminating natural gas from apartment buildings can reduce costs. Hollon's company now shares its designs and budgets with other builders. "The reason we're giving it away is to clean up the air," Hollon says. "We want everybody to do it. It's everybody's air that we're all breathing. Makes my mountain bike ride that much easier." Kim Raff for NPR hide caption

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Kim Raff for NPR

America's Energy Future: How Gas Companies Are Fighting To Block Climate Rules

Natural gas utilities face a bleak future in a world increasingly concerned about climate change. An NPR investigation shows how they work to block local climate action and protect their business.

America's Energy Future: How Gas Companies Are Fighting To Block Climate Rules

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Anne Cook sits with her husband, Jack Cook, as he receives his second dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine during a mass vaccination event in the parking lot of Coors Field on Saturday in Denver, Colo. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Optimism About Case Rates, Vaccines, And Future Of The Pandemic

After more than 500,000 deaths and nearly a full year, experts say there are a growing number of reasons to be optimistic about the direction of the pandemic. Cases, hospitalizations and deaths have all fallen dramatically in recent weeks.

Optimism About Case Rates, Vaccines, And Future Of The Pandemic

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