Consider This from NPR Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.
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Every weekday afternoon, the hosts of NPR's All Things Considered help you make sense of a major news story and what it means for you in 15 minutes. In participating regions, you'll also hear from local journalists about what's happening in your community.

Most Recent Episodes

Scottish Conservative leader Douglas Ross and former leader Ruth Davidson hold placards, in front of Stirling Castle on Wednesday during campaigning for the Scottish Parliamentary election. Andrew Milligan/AP hide caption

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Andrew Milligan/AP

Scotland May Try To Break Away From The United Kingdom — Again

On Thursday, Scots vote in Regional Parliamentary elections. That's not usually an international story, but the ruling Scottish National Party is running on a platform to hold another independence referendum. Another vote on whether Scotland should leave the United Kingdom. Northern Ireland and Wales could follow their lead.

Scotland May Try To Break Away From The United Kingdom — Again

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Businesses are struggling to find employees and some supply chains remain disrupted, but the economy seems to be moving in the right direction. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Is The Biden Rescue Plan Working? 'American Indicators' Weigh In On The Recovery

The pandemic economy has left different people in vastly different situations. Today, we follow up with four American indicators — people whose paths will help us understand the arc of the recovery. You first heard their stories back in February. Now, we're talking to them again to ask how the American Rescue Plan has affected their lives — or not.

Is The Biden Rescue Plan Working? 'American Indicators' Weigh In On The Recovery

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Immigrant families walk to a U.S. Border Patrol processing station after they crossed the Rio Grande from Mexico on Thursday in Roma, Texas. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

How Brazen Smugglers Are Fueling Record Numbers At The Southern Border

A record 172,000 migrants were apprehended at the southern border in March. Those numbers are fueled, in part, by smuggling organizations that exploit desperate migrants, most of them from central America. NPR's John Burnett and KTEP's Angela Kocherga report on their tactics.

How Brazen Smugglers Are Fueling Record Numbers At The Southern Border

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Indians who lost their lives to COVID-19 are cremated in funeral pyres in New Delhi. The aerial photo was taken on Monday. Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP via Getty Images

How India's COVID-19 Outbreak Got So Bad, And Why It May Be Even Worse Than We Know

Things have gone from bad to worse in the pandemic's global epicenter. India reported nearly 400,000 new COVID-19 cases on Friday — and the death count is likely higher than current estimates. Lauren Frayer, NPR's correspondent in Mumbai, explains why. Follow more of her work here or on Twitter @lfrayer.

How India's COVID-19 Outbreak Got So Bad, And Why It May Be Even Worse Than We Know

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President Joe Biden addresses a joint session of Congress at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on April 28. Melina Mara/POOL/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Melina Mara/POOL/AFP via Getty Images

What Makes President Biden's Massive Spending Pitch So Historic

Any one of President Biden's multi-trillion-dollar spending packages would be among the largest ever enacted by Congress. He has passed one — the American Recuse Plan — and proposed two others in his first 100 days.

What Makes President Biden's Massive Spending Pitch So Historic

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The latest guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says people who are fully vaccinated do not need to wear a mask when they're outdoors unless they're in a crowded space. Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

The CDC's New Mask Guidance, Explained, And A Look At How Long Vaccines Protect Us

Fully vaccinated people can ditch the mask outdoors, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said this week — unless they're at a crowded event. Dr. Anthony Fauci explains the new guidance to NPR and weighs in on how soon children under 16 might be eligible for vaccines.

The CDC's New Mask Guidance, Explained, And A Look At How Long Vaccines Protect Us

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Some states have gained or lost Electoral College votes because of changes in population numbers recorded by the 2020 census. Zach Levitt/NPR hide caption

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Zach Levitt/NPR

New Census Numbers Mean A Political Power Shift For Some States

The first set of results from the 2020 census are in, and according to the count, the official population of the United States is 331,449,281.

New Census Numbers Mean A Political Power Shift For Some States

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An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man receives a dose of the Pfizer-BioNtech vaccine in the Israeli city of Bnei Brak in February. Mostafa Alkharouf/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Mostafa Alkharouf/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

How Faith Leaders In Israel And The U.K. Are Fighting Vaccine Hesitancy

Israel and the United Kingdom are among the most-vaccinated countries in the world. Their success is due in part to public health campaigns designed to fight vaccine disinformation in faith and minority communities.

How Faith Leaders In Israel And The U.K. Are Fighting Vaccine Hesitancy

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A line of policeman take aim. Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann Archive

BONUS: Policing In America

Black Americans being victimized and killed by the police is an epidemic. As the trial of Derek Chauvin plays out, it's a truth and a trauma many people in the US and around the world are again witnessing first hand. But this tension between African American communities and the police has existed for centuries. This week, the origins of policing in the United States and how those origins put violent control of Black Americans at the heart of the system.

BONUS: Policing In America

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An NPR investigation into the SolarWinds attack reveals a hack unlike any other, launched by a sophisticated adversary intent on exploiting the soft underbelly of our digital lives. Zoë van Dijk for NPR hide caption

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Zoë van Dijk for NPR

The Story Behind The SolarWinds Cyberattack

Last year, hackers believed to be directed by the Russian intelligence service, the SVR, slipped a malicious code into a routine software update from a Texas- based company called SolarWinds. They then used it as a vehicle for a massive cyberattack against America and successfully infiltrated Microsoft, Intel, Cisco and other companies, and federal agencies including the Treasury Department, Justice Department, Energy Department and the Pentagon.

The Story Behind The SolarWinds Cyberattack

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