Coronavirus Daily A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Coronavirus Daily

From NPR

A daily news podcast about the coronavirus pandemic, covering all dimensions of the story from science to economics and politics as well as society and culture. Hosted by Kelly McEvers from Embedded. Approximately 10 minutes in length. Publishing weekday afternoons. Includes stories and interviews from NPR's Science, International, National, Business and Washington reporting teams, as well as station reporters, and the crews at Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Most Recent Episodes

A woman wearing a mask pushes a shopping cart as she crosses a street in Queens on March 30, 2019 in New York City. JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JOHANNES EISELE/AFP via Getty Images

The Mask Debate; Preventing More New York-Sized Clusters

Officials on the White House coronavirus task force have a goal: to limit the number of U.S. deaths from COVID-19 to 100,000 people. But they say preventing more clusters the size of New York and New Jersey is key.

The Mask Debate; Preventing More New York-Sized Clusters

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The USNS Comfort navy hospital ship sits docked at Pier 90 on March 31, 2020 in New York City. - The ship arrived in New York March 30 as New York prepares to fight the peak of the pandemic that has killed over 2,500 people across the US. The ship will treat non-virus-related patients, helping to ease the burden of hospitals overwhelmed by the crisis. ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ANGELA WEISS/AFP via Getty Images

Trump And Governors Mix Messages; Managing Your Mortgage Or Rent

Throughout the coronavirus pandemic, messages from President Trump and state governors have been mixed. Meanwhile, New York City has over 40,000 confirmed cases of COVID-19, making it the epicenter of the pandemic in America. WNYC reporter Gwynne Hogan visits a Brooklyn hospital on the front lines of the pandemic, and the owner of a restaurant in Manhattan's Chinatown explains why he closed three weeks ago. Also, tips to help you pay your mortgage or rent if you've lost your job.

Trump And Governors Mix Messages; Managing Your Mortgage Or Rent

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President Trump listens to Anthony Fauci, Director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases during the daily coronavirus briefing at the White House on Sunday. At the same briefing, Trump announced extended social distancing guidelines in effect until April 30. Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images hide caption

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Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

Social Distancing Extended; Grocery Store Tips

Two weeks ago, President Trump told Americans to stay home for 15 days. On Sunday, he extended that guidance for another month, as the U.S. trails behind other countries on per-capita testing. NPR's Allison Aubrey reports on a new test expected this week that promises quicker results.

Social Distancing Extended; Grocery Store Tips

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US President Donald Trump signs the CARES act, a $2 trillion rescue package to provide economic relief amid the coronavirus outbreak, at the Oval Office of the White House on March 27, 2020. Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

Trump Signs Aid Package, Epicenter Is Now The U.S.

The $2 trillion economic recovery package is now law, as the number of COVID-19 cases in America approaches 100,000 and deaths near 1,500. A Johns Hopkins scientist weighs in on the idea of relaxing social distancing in select locations and the importance of more testing for coronavirus. And we explain when Americans could expect to receive federal stimulus money.

Trump Signs Aid Package, Epicenter Is Now The U.S.

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A shopping center with closed retail stores due to the COVID-19 outbreak in Farmington Hills, Michigan, on March 26, 2020. Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff Kowalsky/AFP via Getty Images

Unemployment Claims Hit Record as Testing Grows — But Is It Fast Enough?

Weekly unemployment claims soared last week to nearly 3.3 million and Congress works to finalize a coronavirus relief package. Plus Anthony Fauci talks about the state of testing for Covid-19 in the US, and NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports on why more testing is critical. Also, a grocer in Maine reflects on the boredom and anxiety of working through the pandemic.

Unemployment Claims Hit Record as Testing Grows — But Is It Fast Enough?

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The US Capitol Building on March 25, 2020, in Washington, DC. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Details Emerge On Senate's $2 Trillion Rescue Package

It would be the largest such stimulus package in American history. The Governor of New York says it's not nearly enough. Plus, NPR's Ayesha Rascoe reports on the confusion about the Trump administration's use of the Federal Defense Production Act, and how one ER doctor in Seattle is coping on the front lines of the pandemic.

Details Emerge On Senate's $2 Trillion Rescue Package

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The nearly empty baggage claim area at McCarran International Airport in Las Vegas on March 19, 2020. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

New York City, U.S. Epicenter, Braces For Peak

Governor Andrew Cuomo said the pandemic could peak in New York in the next 14-21 days — around the same time President Trump said he'd love to "open" the economy. Plus why the aviation and other transportation industries are lining up for federal bailout money, and a theory about why the virus might be so good at spreading.

New York City, U.S. Epicenter, Braces For Peak

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A message on a sign placed in front of the Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign, where tourists often line up to take photos, displays a message about social distancing due to the continuing spread of the coronavirus. Ethan Miller/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethan Miller/Getty Images

The Cost Of Social Distancing

How do officials weigh the economic cost against the public health benefit? Plus a report from the hardest-hit area of Italy, and a sampling of free things that you had to pay for before the coronavirus.

The Cost Of Social Distancing

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People wearing face masks walk by a closed theatre with a message about staying healthy in Berkeley, California on March 18, 2020. Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP via Getty Images

CA, NY On Lockdown; Mortgage Relief For Some Homeowners

Two of the hardest-hit states order residents to stay home in an effort to fight the pandemic. Plus what the World Health Organization has learned about the coronavirus in the months since it began to spread. And how homeowners could have their mortgage payments reduced or suspended for up to 12 months.

CA, NY On Lockdown; Mortgage Relief For Some Homeowners

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Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C., pictured here in 2019, warned a small group of constituents on Feb. 27 about the impact of the coronavirus on the U.S., according to a secret recording obtained by NPR. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

GOP Senator Raised Virus Alarms Weeks Ago — In Private

U.S. Sen. Richard Burr, in a private luncheon, compared the coronavirus to the 1918 flu. NPR's Tim Mak obtained a secret recording — more of his reporting is here. Plus how nurses are coping in the Seattle region, and why schools are struggling to make informed decisions about keeping kids home from school.

GOP Senator Raised Virus Alarms Weeks Ago — In Private

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