State of the World from NPR Immerse yourself in the most compelling and consequential stories from around the globe. The world is changing in big ways every day. State of the World from NPR takes you where the news is happening — and explains why it matters. With bureaus spanning the globe, NPR reporters bring you facts and context from the ground so you can cut through the noise of disinformation. NPR's State of the World, a human perspective on global stories in just a few minutes, every weekday. State of the World was previously State of Ukraine. You'll continue to hear Ukraine coverage here, along with other international stories.

Support NPR's reporting by subscribing to State of the World+ and unlock sponsor-free listening. Learn more at plus.npr.org/stateoftheworld

State of the World from NPR

From NPR

Immerse yourself in the most compelling and consequential stories from around the globe. The world is changing in big ways every day. State of the World from NPR takes you where the news is happening — and explains why it matters. With bureaus spanning the globe, NPR reporters bring you facts and context from the ground so you can cut through the noise of disinformation. NPR's State of the World, a human perspective on global stories in just a few minutes, every weekday. State of the World was previously State of Ukraine. You'll continue to hear Ukraine coverage here, along with other international stories.

Support NPR's reporting by subscribing to State of the World+ and unlock sponsor-free listening. Learn more at plus.npr.org/stateoftheworld

Most Recent Episodes

Ultra-Orthodox Jewish men pray at a yeshiva in Bnei Brak, Israel, on March 21. The war in Gaza has prompted calls for Israel to end military exemptions for full-time religious students. Tamir Kalifa for NPR hide caption

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Tamir Kalifa for NPR

The Debate in Israel Over Who Should Be Required Serve in the Military

Ultra-Orthodox Israelis have long been exempt from compulsory military service. But the October 7th attack by Hamas and Israel's subsequent military response have brought forward calls for change. The government's decision on whether to end the exemption has major political consequences.

The Debate in Israel Over Who Should Be Required Serve in the Military

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The Devastating Conflict the World is Ignoring

More than 8 million people have been displaced in Sudan, according to the United Nations. A powerful paramilitary group has been fighting the Sudanese army for over a year. We hear from a Sudanese poet, who is trying to draw attention to the overlooked conflict in her country.

The Devastating Conflict the World is Ignoring

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Israeli Iron Dome air defense system launches to intercept missiles fired from Iran, in central Israel, Sunday, April 14, 2024. Tomer Neuberg/AP hide caption

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Tomer Neuberg/AP

Now That Iran Has Attacked Israel, What Happens Next?

Following the attack of more than 300 weaponized drones and missiles launched by Iran at Israel, the Israeli prime minster is getting pressure from the U.S. for Israel to be measured in its response, while some domestic politicians are demanding a strong reaction. Our correspondent in Tel Aviv gives us the latest. And Jordan was part of the success in shooting down the majority of projectiles bound for Israel. We hear what the reaction has been in that country where 60 percent of the population is of Palestinian origin.

Now That Iran Has Attacked Israel, What Happens Next?

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Albert Rudatsimburwa, a freelancer journalist reporting in the East African region poses for a portrait in his home. Jacques Nkinzingabo for NPR hide caption

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Jacques Nkinzingabo for NPR

What Rwanda Looks Like 30 Years After the Genocide

It has been three decades since the East African country of Rwanda experienced a genocide that changed the country and shocked the world. We look at the state of their society today.

What Rwanda Looks Like 30 Years After the Genocide

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An aerial view taken on March 9, 2023 shows Thitu Island in the South China Sea. - As a Philippine Coast Guard plane carrying journalists flew over the Spratly Islands in the hotly disputed South China Sea, a Chinese voice issued a stern command over the radio: "Leave immediately." JAM STA ROSA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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JAM STA ROSA/AFP via Getty Images

A Remote Island Outpost that is Part of a Geopolitical Fight

Ownership of the Spratly Islands are in dispute. This has been the case for decades, but tensions have been raised recently as China has tried to expand its claims in the remote area. We get a rare glimpse of one of the islands that has a Filipino community living on it.

A Remote Island Outpost that is Part of a Geopolitical Fight

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Women are shown at a rally to celebrate International Women's Day on March 8, 2024 in Seoul, South Korea. Participants of the rally advocated for a society free from institutional discrimination, one where women can enjoy equal rights with men. Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images hide caption

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Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images

Why are Young Men and Women in South Korea Drifting Apart Politically?

While the ideological gender gap among young people is widening across the developed world, it is particularly alarming in South Korea. Experts are concerned about what it means for the country's future. Our reporter in Seoul examines the phenomenon.

Why are Young Men and Women in South Korea Drifting Apart Politically?

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People walk by a poster to promote the movie "Oppenheimer" Friday, March 29, 2024, in Tokyo. "Oppenheimer" finally premiered in the nation where two cities were obliterated 79 years ago by the nuclear weapons invented by the American scientist who was the subject of the Oscar-winning film. Japanese filmgoers' reactions understandably were mixed and highly emotional. Eugene Hoshiko/AP hide caption

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Eugene Hoshiko/AP

How is the Movie "Oppenheimer" Being Received in Japan?

Understandably, a movie about the man who steered the development of atomic bombs is seen differently in a country where some 200,000 people were killed by those bombs. "Oppenheimer" opened in Japan 8 months after premiering in the U.S. Our reporter talks to movie goers in Nagasaki, Japan.

How is the Movie "Oppenheimer" Being Received in Japan?

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Aviva Siegel in Tel Aviv on April 4, 2024. NPR hide caption

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Held Hostage by Hamas for 51 Days

Aviva Siegel was among the more than 200 Israelis taken hostage by Hamas on October 7th. She was held 51 days before being released. Her husband, Keith, who is a U.S. citizen, is still being held in Gaza. We hear about Aviva Siegel's time in captivity and her advocacy for the release of Keith and the remaining hostages.

Held Hostage by Hamas for 51 Days

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In New Mexico's Torrance County, there has been an increase in high-profile marijuana busts in recent years. NPR hide caption

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The Connection Between Chinese Money and Labor and U.S.-Grown Marijuana

Chinese-funded marijuana farms are popping up across the United States. Many of them exploit workers from China. We go to New Mexico, which has seen the rise of such farms and explore the reasons why this is happening.

The Connection Between Chinese Money and Labor and U.S.-Grown Marijuana

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A Milestone for a Major International Alliance and an Olympic Music Controversy

NATO, the alliance formed to protect Europe from the Soviet Union is marking 75 years. It the focus is still on Russia.

A Milestone for a Major International Alliance and an Olympic Music Controversy

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