Extremely American In Season 2 of Extremely American: Onward Christian Soldiers host Heath Druzin and James Dawson take an inside look at Christian nationalism. The movement aims to end American democracy as we know it and install theocracy, taking rights away from the vast majority of Americans in the process. The season follows the movement through the story of an influential far-right church, its attempt to take over a small town and a dark underbelly of abuse.
Extremely American Season 2
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Extremely American

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In Season 2 of Extremely American: Onward Christian Soldiers host Heath Druzin and James Dawson take an inside look at Christian nationalism. The movement aims to end American democracy as we know it and install theocracy, taking rights away from the vast majority of Americans in the process. The season follows the movement through the story of an influential far-right church, its attempt to take over a small town and a dark underbelly of abuse.

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Season 2: Onward Christian Soldiers

The Christian nationalist movement wants to make America a theocracy — a government under Biblical rule. Christ Church, embedded in a small, rural Idaho college town, is quickly gaining influence and political interest — but how did we get here? In the second season of Extremely American, host Heath Druzin spent a year inside the movement to understand their stark vision for America's future.

Season 2: Onward Christian Soldiers

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Bonus: Beyond Jan. 6: How Militias Are Trying To Remake America

This was originally a Twitter Spaces hosted by NPR and Boise State Public Radio. It's a wide-ranging discussion about where the movements are headed, their outlook with Donald Trump out of office, how online recruitment is changing the face of these groups, and the sometimes unintended effects of anti-extremism strategies.

Bonus: Beyond Jan. 6: How Militias Are Trying To Remake America

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Bonus: The Kenosha Kid

The Kyle Rittenhouse murder trial captured militias' attention like no other criminal case in recent memory. For them, Rittenhouse embodied the way they see themselves: protectors, keeping their communities from anarchy at the end of a rifle. His acquittal was seen as vindication for them and a green light to continue self-styled armed security.

Bonus: The Kenosha Kid

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Taking Militias to Court

Former federal prosecutor Mary McCord is trying to put militias out of business and she's got their attention. She's working on a national strategy to get prosecutors and law enforcement to enforce anti-militia laws she says are on the books in every state. And it's already starting to work.

Taking Militias to Court

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The Resistance

Jennifer Ellis has received threats in her fight to get the Idaho GOP out of the grips of an increasingly far-right ideology. But she's no liberal – she's a conservative rancher who knows her way around firearms and has been a player in GOP politics for years. Now she's trying to pull her party back from its increasing coziness with militias, anti-vaxxers and other far-right groups.

The Resistance

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The 51st State

Way up in the Northern Rockies there's a sort of mythical 51st state. It's called the American Redoubt and it's a kind of theocratic limited government utopia, one with lots of guns. They recruit people to move there, live off the grid and run for office. And it's working – Redoubters are reshaping their communities and as far as they're concerned, those who disagree can leave.

The 51st State

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The Insurrection Wing

.R. Majewski was in Washington D.C. the day of the Capitol insurrection, hoping to see the presidential election of Joe Biden overturned. Now he wants your vote, at least if you live in parts of Ohio. And the partisan redrawing of election maps also means people who would have been fringe candidates in the past now have a chance to gain power at the polls.

The Insurrection Wing

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The Anti-Government Government

When Idaho's governor leaves the state, the lieutenant governor goes rogue and swears in the militia. This was just the latest move for the far-right, militia-adjacent politician. Janice McGeachin is leading a kind of anti-government government and now she and her allies are making a play to take over.

The Anti-Government Government

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People's Fights

People's Rights started as a poorly-attended meeting in a drafty Idaho warehouse. But anti-government activist Ammon Bundy has grown his network to more than 30,000 people nationwide, ready to mobilize and fight the government on a moment's notice — a kind of militia on-demand.

People's Fights

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Voila, Militia

The modern militia movement started, in part, in Lee Miracle's living room. In 1994, a bunch of guys incensed about the deadly government sieges at Ruby Ridge, Idaho and Waco, Texas gathered there. They talked about what they would do if the government came knocking on their door and agreed, they'd want backup.

Voila, Militia

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