Q'ed Up Q'ed Up is a podcast that dives deep into one story over weeks and months (and sometimes in just one episode). We don't just follow the story, the story follows us. We're bringing sound rich, innovative documentary storytelling to topics that matter, from mapping mass migrations to investigating criminal justice. Dive in with us. New episodes launch every Wednesday.
Q'ed Up

Q'ed Up

From KQED

Q'ed Up is a podcast that dives deep into one story over weeks and months (and sometimes in just one episode). We don't just follow the story, the story follows us. We're bringing sound rich, innovative documentary storytelling to topics that matter, from mapping mass migrations to investigating criminal justice. Dive in with us. New episodes launch every Wednesday.More from Q'ed Up »

Most Recent Episodes

The League of Extraordinary Women Married to Firefighters

What's it like to live through a year-round wildfire season when your husband is gone for weeks at a time fighting fires? Reported by Sonja Hutson. Q'ed Up is hosted by Ryan Levi. This episode was produced by Ryan Levi and edited by Jeremy Siegel. Follow Ryan on Twitter at @ryan_levi. Send us a note at qedup@kqed.org. Find more Q'ed Up at kqed.org/qedup.

Looking Back at Oakland's Festival at the Lake

Lake Merritt is a witness to many of the hardest battles and greatest celebrations in Oakland. Reported by Sandhya Dirks. Q'ed Up is hosted by Ryan Levi. This episode was produced by Ryan Levi and edited by Jeremy Siegel. Follow Ryan on Twitter at @ryan_levi. Send us a note at qedup@kqed.org. Find more Q'ed Up at kqed.org/qedup.

What It's Like to Work for a Coding Startup ... In Prison

These prisoners are getting paid to code on the inside for companies on the outside. Reported by Mark Fiore. Q'ed Up is hosted by Ryan Levi. This episode was produced by Ryan Levi and Queena Kim. Follow Ryan on Twitter at @ryan_levi. Send us a note at qedup@kqed.org. Find more Q'ed Up at kqed.org/qedup.

Who Dug a Giant Hole in the Side of Mt. Shasta? And Why?

Almost 10 years ago, someone dug a 60 foot deep hole in the side of California's highest volcano. One video store clerk went on a mission to find out why. Reported by Cat Schuknecht. Q'ed Up is hosted by Ryan Levi. This episode was produced by Ryan Levi and Queena Kim. Follow Ryan on Twitter at @ryan_levi. Send us a note at qedup@kqed.org. Find more Q'ed Up at kqed.org/qedup.

Commemorating 50 Years of the A's in Oakland

There's a lot of baseball history in Oakland. For the latest episode of Q'ed Up, KQED columnist Pendarvis Harshaw talks about the most notable baseball players from Oakland, what they've meant for the sport and the city's African American community.

The West Oakland Teacher Everyone Knows

While some teachers don't last one semester, LuPaulette Taylor has been changing students' lives in West Oakland for nearly 50 years. Reported by Vanessa Rancaño. Q'ed Up is hosted by Ryan Levi. This episode was produced by Ryan Levi and Queena Kim. Follow Ryan on Twitter at @ryan_levi. Send us a note at qedup@kqed.org. Find more Q'ed Up at kqed.org/qedup.

How Cannabis Helped a Berkley Boy Go From 100 Seizures a Day to None

You can trace the first FDA-approved, cannabis-derived prescription drug back to one family in Berkeley. Reported by Lesley McClurg. This episode of was hosted and produced by Ryan Levi and edited by Queena Kim. Follow Ryan on Twitter at @ryan_levi. Send us a note at qedup@kqed.org. Find more Q'ed Up at kqed.org/qedup.

The Lasting Trauma of the North Bay Fires

Since leaving her Santa Rosa home last year, Danielle Bryant has struggled with many symptoms of trauma, a common experience for people after a life-threatening event.

Separation is Separation, Whether at the Border or in Prison

A 19-year-old spoken word artist reflects on family separation at the border and in his own life. Reported by Laura Klivans. This episode of was hosted and produced by Ryan Levi and edited by Jeremy Siegel. Follow Ryan on Twitter at @ryan_levi. Send us a note at qedup@kqed.org. Find more Q'ed Up at kqed.org/qedup.

Why California's Best Strategy Against Wildfire Is Hardly Ever Used

Experts say it's possible to avoid catastrophic harm to human and forest health by setting planned burns before human error, lightning or arson choose when fires start. But it's easier said than done.

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