Criminal (In)Justice Problems with police, prosecutors and courts have people asking: is our criminal justice system broken? University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris interviews the people who know the system best, and hears their best ideas for fixing it.
Criminal (In)Justice

Criminal (In)Justice

From 90.5 WESA

Problems with police, prosecutors and courts have people asking: is our criminal justice system broken? University of Pittsburgh law professor David Harris interviews the people who know the system best, and hears their best ideas for fixing it.More from Criminal (In)Justice »

Most Recent Episodes

#89 What Women Bring to Policing (reprise)

Criminal Injustice returns with new episodes on January 8, 2019. Until then, we're reposting some of our favorite interviews. This episode originally appeared Sep 18, 2018. ================ Female police officers bring a unique, positive skill set to the job. They communicate better, and have a special talent for de-escalation. In an era when we want less force and more de-escalation, should the future of policing be female? Guest Dr. Cara Rabe-Hemp is professor in the Department of Criminal Studies at Illinois State University. She the author of Thriving in an All-Boys Club: Female Police and their Fight for Equality (2018).

Bonus: First Step's a Doozy

The First Step Act was supposed to be a bold, bipartisan move toward federal criminal justice reform. But while the bill may actually become law, it's a baby step at best.

Bonus: Trump vs the Judiciary

President Trump often flings accusations of partisan bias when judicial decisions don't go his way. Why can't Team Trump catch a break in court?

Bonus: Criminal Justice on the Ballot

From marijuana legalization to voter re-enfranchisement, criminal justice-related referenda were all over this year's ballots. Dave breaks down 2018 midterm election results.

#94 Spillover Effects of Violence on Black Americans

When the police kill an unarmed black man, we know the family and community suffer. But what about other people – particularly Black Americans beyond those closest to the victim – what's the impact on them? The spillover effect of police killings and other violence on Black Americans? Our guest is Brentin Mock, a journalist who writes for CityLab.com, of the Atlantic. Mr. Mock's article, "Police Killings and Violence Are Driving Black People Crazy," explains the new studies that demonstrate the wide impact police killings and other violence have on Black people who are not themselves directly affected.

Ask Dave: What Else Do the Canadians Know?

From Chad in Hawaii, a followup to our Nov. 6 episode on full legalization of marijuana in Canada: if the Canadian government has better data on drug-related crimes than the U.S., do they track other things that we don't? We put the question back to our friends up north.

Bonus: The Confluence, Nov. 5

The shooter in the Tree of Life synagogue murders pleads not guilty. David shares analysis on 90.5 WESA's The Confluence.

#93: Evidence Based Policing

We often hear about new methods police try to achieve better results against crime. But do the police have any reason to believe that their new approaches will work? Are their new initiatives based on hope, or on actual evidence that they will really help? Our guest, Dr. Cynthia Lum, is Professor of Criminology and Director of the Center for Evidence Based Crime Policy, George Mason University. She'll talk to us about Evidence Based Policing – and how she and her colleagues pioneered an approach that can make sure that what police want to do will really improve things.

Ask Dave: Is It Illegal to Lie to the FBI?

Apropos of nothing in particular, Bruce from Norwich, CT wants to know about the legal risks of knowingly giving false information to federal investigators.

Bonus: O Cannabis

Canada becomes the second country in the world to fully legalize marijuana. What happens next?

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