On My Block KUT News tells the stories of people who are on the front lines of changes in Austin--and the stories of what happens when a place becomes valuable to a new group of people.
On My Block

On My Block

From KUT 90.5

KUT News tells the stories of people who are on the front lines of changes in Austin--and the stories of what happens when a place becomes valuable to a new group of people.

Most Recent Episodes

12th & Chicon: Live Broadcast Wrap-up

In October, KUT embarked on a project to tell the story of a neighborhood in transition: the area around 12th and Chicon streets in East Austin. Decades ago, it was a center of black life in the city, but over the past few years, the forces of gentrification have taken hold. We opened a bureau there to maintain a presence in the neighborhood and allow residents to see KUT reporters on a daily basis and help us determine the stories that needed to be told.

12th & Chicon: Surviving the Development

KUT's Jennifer Stayton spoke with Nefertiti Jackmon, executive director of Six Square, and Natasha Madison of the 12th Street Merchants' Association at a live broadcast during Morning Edition from the Urban Co-Lab on 12th and Chicon streets. This is an excerpt from the entire broadcast which can be heard on another episode of this podcast.

12th & Chicon: AISD's Achievement Gap

As the Austin Independent School District deals with declining enrollment and decisions about facilities and campuses, many wonder if students across the district are getting the same quality of education. AISD school board member Ted Gordon, who represents District 1 in East and Northeast Austin, joined KUT's Jennifer Stayton to discuss achievement gaps and possible solutions in the district.

12th & Chicon: Austin's Affordability Crisis

Dr. Eric Tang is an associate professor at the Institute for Urban Policy Research and Analysis at UT-Austin. After analyzing that data a few years back, Tang wanted to look more closely at why African-Americans were leaving Austin – specifically, East Austin. KUT's Jennifer Stayton spoke to Tang about this new research for our On My Block series.

12th & Chicon: Preserving the Community's History

On the East Side, development and rising property costs continue to force the African-American community out. With such rapid migration, how have the neighborhood's history and culture and the city's African-American population been preserved? LaToya Devezin, the community archivist at the Austin History Center, spoke to KUT's Jennifer Stayton about the work of local archivists...

12th & Chicon: Growing Up on the East Side

The neighborhoods in East Austin looked a lot different in the 1980s and 90s. Two childhood friends who grew up near 12th and Chicon reflect upon their youth, their struggles and the mistakes they made. They wonder if the crime of yesteryear in their community lead to its gentrification.

12th & Chicon: Showing Kealing Students Their Potential

Kealing Middle School Principal Kenisha Coburn is focused on figuring out ways to get the school's underrepresented students to realize their academic potential. The school is divided between a magnet program, which accepts students from across the district, and the academy program, which is made up of students from the neighborhood. One of the first...

12th & Chicon: What's The Future Of East 12th Street?

One-fourth of what was once a thriving business corridor for Austin's African-American community is now owned by Eureka Holdings, a company based in Grapevine, outside Dallas. Eureka is currently renting some of these properties and the buildings on them, other properties are undeveloped and being held for undetermined future plans.

12th & Chicon: Churches Adapt to Changes

The loss of long-time East Austin residents is changing the look of some congregations. The handful of remaining churches are learning to embrace the diversity and changes within their communities, but some are left with no choice but to pull up their roots and move to a new location.

12th & Chicon: Remembering the Harlem Theater

According to a book co-written by the curator of the Austin History Center, the Harlem Theater was one of only seven black-owned theaters in the country in the early 20th century. And, compared to other theaters in Austin, where black customers were either not allowed or segregated to the balcony seats, it offered moviegoers their...