Boston Public Radio Join hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan for a smart local conversation with leaders and thinkers shaping Boston and New England. We feature our favorite conversation from each show.
Boston Public Radio

Boston Public Radio

From WGBH Radio

Join hosts Jim Braude and Margery Eagan for a smart local conversation with leaders and thinkers shaping Boston and New England. We feature our favorite conversation from each show.

Most Recent Episodes

BPR Full Show: Sky High

Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners about their marijuana habits, after a report showed cannabis tax revenue has surpassed alcohol revenue in the state. Lylah Alphonse updates listeners on the latest news from Rhode Island, including the status of marijuana legalization and the state of hospitals amid the Omicron surge. Alphonse is the Rhode Island editor for The Boston Globe. Charlie Sennott weighs in on growing tensions between Russia and Ukraine, and the Biden Administration's foreign policy decisions. Sennott is a GBH News analyst and the founder and CEO of The GroundTruth Project. Edgar B. Herwick III looks back on this season of the Curiosity Desk, including answering questions about fruit flies, right-on-red rules and unwritten rules of Boston. Edgar B Herwick III is host of the Curiosity Desk at GBH, which just wrapped up season one of its YouTube show. The Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III discusses Dorothy Day's legacy after the Archdiocese of New York asked the Vatican to make her a saint. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston and the inaugural dean of Africana studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host the "All Rev'd Up" podcast at GBH. Corby Kummer talks about the growth of quality restaurants in suburbs and vodka infused oysters. Kummer is the executive director of the food and society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. We end the show by asking listeners what items they have not been able to find at the grocery store, and Americans' allegiances to particular food brands.

BPR Full Show: Tuna melts, mac and cheese and all things comfort food

Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners what parts of pre-pandemic life they have left behind as we enter year three of COVID-19. LaTosha Brown weighs in on what the fight for voting rights and recent legislative failure means for the country's Black community. LaTosha Brown is the co-founder of Black Voters Matter. Callie Crossley talks about the death of fashion journalist and Vogue editor André Leon Talley, and where to find the best comfort food in Boston. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Andy Ihnatko updates listeners on all things tech, including a study by the Fed into whether the U.S. should create a "digital dollar" and debates over the effect of 5G on airports. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Sue O'Connell discusses a viral clip of a TV reporter getting hit by a car while on live air, the death of Meat Loaf and controversial updates to the M&M characters. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Eliza Parad critiques the state of bike safety in Boston, and what the city should do to improve biking in the city. Parad is the Director of Organizing for the Boston Cyclists Union. We end the show by asking listeners for their favorite comfort foods.

BPR Full Show: Jeopardy!

Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates listeners on all things politics, including the failure of Democrats to pass voting rights legislation and the state of President Joe Biden's term. Todd is the moderator of "Meet the Press," host of "Meet the Press Daily" on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on Attorney General Maura Healey's announcement that she is running for governor. Andrea Cabral tells the story of a con artist from Rhode Island arrested after faking his own death, and discusses debates over the efficacy of road tests for driving while high. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Paul Reville explains how things are going in schools amid the Omicron surge and mental health crisis. Reville is the former Massachusetts secretary of education and a professor at Harvard University's Graduate School of Education, where he also heads the Education Redesign Lab. His latest book, co-authored with Lynne Sacks, is "Collaborative Action for Equity and Opportunity: A Practical Guide for School and Community Leaders." Shirley Leung discusses the state overpaying unemployment and asking for money back, and the latest news from Mass. and Cass. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Tom Nichols shares tips on competing in Jeopardy and why he thinks long running winning streaks are antithetical to the show's character. Nichols is a Contributing Writer and proprietor of "Peacefield" newsletter at The Atlantic, a professor of national security affairs at the US Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island and a five-time Jeopardy winner. We end the show by asking listeners for stories of grudges they still hold.

BPR Full Show: Going Gray

Today on Boston Public Radio: Art Caplan weighs in on the CDC's messaging around Omicron, and threats to trans healthcare in Arkansas. Caplan is director of the division of medical ethics at the New York University School of Medicine. Then, we ask listeners their thoughts on the U.S. sending citizens free at-home tests and masks. Juliette Kayyem talks about the unique challenges of protecting synagogues following the hostage standoff at Congregation Beth Israel in Texas. Kayyem is an analyst for CNN, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland Security and faculty chair of the homeland security program at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government. Blair Miller and Elizabeth Bartholet discuss the state of adoption laws and child welfare amid the disappearance of Harmony Montgomery. Miller is a Boston Channel 25 reporter and the adoptive father of Harmony Montgomery's brother. Bartholet is the Morris Wasserstein Professor of Law, Emeritus, at Harvard Law School, and Faculty Director of the Child Advocacy Program. Nia Grace and Gabriel O'Malley share their experiences running restaurants in one of the toughest winters for the industry, and their reactions to Mayor Michelle Wu's vaccine mandate. Grace is owner of soul food restaurant Darryl's Corner Bar & Kitchen in Roxbury and the recently opened The Underground Café + Lounge, and co-founder of the Boston Black Hospitality Coalition. O'Malley is co-owner of The Plough and Stars in Cambridge. Matt Gilbert recommends the best of TV from 2021, including "Succession" and "The White Lotus," and what he's looking forward to in 2022, including "All Creatures Great and Small" and "The Gilded Age." Gilbert is the TV critic for The Boston Globe. We end the show by asking listeners their opinions on letting hair go gray and the sexism in cultural norms around gray hair.

BPR Full Show: Mayor Michelle Wu calls vaccine mandate rollout "very smooth"

Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their experiences with Massachusetts overpaying jobless claims and asking for money back. Trenni Kusnierek talks about Novak Djokovic's expulsion from Australia, Naomi Osaka's return to tennis and the state of the Patriots. Kusnierek is a reporter and anchor for NBC Sports Boston, and a weekly Boston Public Radio contributor. Mayor Michelle Wu takes questions from listeners, including on the response to the first few days of the city's vaccine mandate, protests she faces outside her home and issues with the MBTA. Wu is mayor of Boston. Tiffani Faison shares why she closed her iconic Boston restaurant Tiger Mama, her upcoming new ventures and how she has stayed resilient during a challenging time for the industry. Faison is an award-winning chef and restaurateur. She plans to open in March three new eateries: Dive Bar, Tenderoni's and Bubble Bath. Vivian and Elisa Girard tell the story of what inspired them to take housing issues into their own hands, building small affordable housing units in Dorchester. Vivan and Elisa Gergard are the husband and wife duo behind a coming apartment complex in the Field's Corner district of Dorchester. John King updates listeners on all things national politics, including the faltering state of voting rights legislation and polarization in the U.S. King is CNN's Chief National Correspondent and anchor of "Inside Politics," which airs weekdays and Sunday mornings at 8 a.m. We end the show by asking listeners their ideas for lowering the cost of housing in the city.

BPR Full Show: Voting Rights and the Legacy of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Today on Boston Public Radio: Rev. Cornell William Brooks discusses the Black faith leaders that engaged in a hunger strike for voting rights, and shares why he likens the Jan. 6 Capitol attacks to the Confederate attack at Fort Sumter. Brooks is the Hauser Professor of the Practice of Nonprofit Organizations and Professor of the Practice of Public Leadership and Social Justice at the Harvard Kennedy School. Brooks is the former president and CEO of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), a civil rights attorney, and an ordained minister. We then ask listeners about failed voting rights legislation, and what it means for midterms and the 2024 presidential election. Simon van Zuylen-Wood talks about Hillbilly Elegy author J.D. Vance's run for U.S. Senate, and his decision to tag himself as a conservative outsider. van Zuylen-Wood is a freelance journalist based in NYC, who's recently written about the radicalization of JD Vance. Evan Horowitz updates us on how Mass. could bring in more than $1 billion in revenue if voters approve a ballot question to implement a "Millionaire's Tax" in the state. Horowitz is executive director of the Center for State Policy Analysis at Tufts. Revs. Irene Monroe and Emmett G. Price III share their thoughts on the fate of the Democrats' voting rights bill, and reflect on the life and legacy of Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. Monroe is a syndicated religion columnist and the Boston voice for Detour's African American Heritage Trail. Price is founding pastor of Community of Love Christian Fellowship in Allston, the Inaugural Dean of Africana Studies at Berklee College of Music. Together, they host the "All Rev'd Up" podcast at GBH. We open the phone lines, continuing our conversation with listeners on the state of voting rights. We end the show by replaying our conversation with New Yorker writer Jelani Cobb on his book, "The Essential Kerner Commission Report," which places the 1968 Kerner Commission Report in today's political context.

BPR Full Show: Snail E-mail

Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners their thoughts on incentives and disincentives to raise vaccination rates, like free doughnuts or higher health insurance. Bill McKibben reviews the apocalyptic climate film "Don't Look Up," and talked about the state of climate change as parts of the world see record temperatures. McKibben is co-founder of 350.org and the author of numerous books about climate change. His latest book is "Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?" Callie Crossley talks about Maya Angelou becoming the first Black woman to appear on a U.S. quarter, laws requiring beauticians to undergo domestic violence prevention training and Oreos turning 110 years old. Crossley hosts GBH's Under the Radar and Basic Black. Andy Ihnatko explains a chip shortage affecting printer companies and allegations of bullying over green and blue chat bubbles on iPhones. Ihnatko is a tech writer and blogger, posting at Ihnatko.com. Christopher Muther shares tips on weighing the risks of travel with Omicron on the rise, the costs and benefits of travel insurance and why he loves Ronnie Spector. Muther is a Boston Globe travel columnist and travel writer. Sue O'Connell discusses Amy Schneider becoming the first woman to break $1 million on Jeopardy, and Buckingham Palace forcing Prince Andrew to relinquish military and honorific titles amid a sexual-abuse lawsuit and ties with Jeffrey Epstein. O'Connell is the co-publisher of Bay Windows and the South End News, as well as NECN's political commentator and explainer-in-chief. Sue O'Connell on BPR | Jan. 14, 2022 We end the show by asking listeners for their thoughts on an email platform that intentionally slows down email delivery to provide a work-life balance.

BPR Full Show: Rent on the Rise

Today on Boston Public Radio: Chuck Todd updates listeners on the latest political headlines, including the state of voting rights and filibuster reform. Todd is the moderator of "Meet the Press," host of "Meet the Press Daily" on MSNBC and the political director for NBC News. Then, we ask listeners whether they support activists going to politician's doors to protest. Andrea Cabral discusses Governor Charlie Baker commuting the sentences of Thomas E. Koonce and William Allen and legal fights over vaccination mandates. Cabral is the former Suffolk County sheriff and the former Massachusetts secretary of public safety. She is currently the CEO of the cannabis company Ascend. Then, we ask listeners for their housing horror stories with rent on the rise. Dr. Katherine Gergen-Barnett takes questions on all things health from listeners, including the state of Omicron and latest mask guidance. Gergen-Barnett teaches in the family medicine department at Boston Medical Center and Boston University Medical School.

BPR Full Show: Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls on Biden to cancel student debt

Today on Boston Public Radio: We begin the show by asking listeners if they think the lies of the 2020 election will repeat themselves in the 2022 midterms and 2024 presidential race. Rep. Ayanna Pressley calls for President Joe Biden to cancel student loan debt, criticizes Governor Charlie Baker's pandemic response and pushes for urgent action on voting rights. Pressley is the U.S. Representative for Massachusetts 7th District. Rep. Mike Connolly weighs in on state debates over rent control, and whether he thinks there is enough momentum to get Mayor Michelle Wu's housing plan passed. Connolly is a Massachusetts State Representative and co-sponsor of the Tenant Protection Act. Shirley Leung talks about today's tent demolitions at Mass. and Cass, and luxury apartment buildings providing access to rapid tests. Leung is a business columnist for The Boston Globe and a Boston Public Radio contributor. Corby Kummer updates listeners on changes to SNAP benefits that would allow people to purchase hot meals and from restaurants, and Taco Bell's new subscription service. Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy. Art Caplan discusses the first heart transplant using a genetically modified pig heart, and debates over the severity of Omicron. Caplan is director of the division of medical ethics at the New York University School of Medicine. We end the show by talking with listeners about whether they have attended large events or made other risky pandemic decisions they regret.

Food stamp benefits could soon be used to purchase restaurant meals, prepared foods

Numerous states are looking into extending food stamp use to restaurants and prepared meals to keep up with what academics are calling the lack of time, skills, resources, and physical abilities of some SNAP users. Award-winning food writer Corby Kummer joined Boston Public Radio on Wednesday to share why more states are looking into joining the SNAP Restaurant Meals Program, and where food policy needs to change. "When it comes down to it, realistically, the people who need and rely on nutrition assistance often work two jobs, they're supporting families, and they have no time at all to cook and prepare the wholesome food that SNAP was originally designed to restrict them to buying," Kummer said. When Restaurant Meals started in 2003, 19 states participated in the program. That number shrank to just four states by 2018. Now, six states — Arizona, California, Maryland, Michigan, Rhode Island, and Virginia — let some people who receive SNAP benefits use food stamps at restaurants. Illinois and New York are both in the process of applying to the Restaurant Meals Program. Kummer told Boston Public Radio that states have to prove that there are enough high need residents — such as "adults over 60, people with disabilities, and those who are homeless and their spouses" — to get exemptions in the Restaurant Meals Program and SNAP. While the Restaurant Meals Program has been applauded by food equity advocates and anti-hunger organizations, small restaurants have been slow to participate in the program due to lengthy bureaucratic processes. Instead, large chains like McDonald's and Subway are often state-certified for the program. "It's a lot of paperwork on the part of the restaurant, and so this in the beginning seemed like it was going to be a boon for for smaller restaurants, especially with [something like a] high volume, local sandwich shop that opens," Kummer noted. "But [the paperwork] turned out to be so cumbersome that it discouraged all but the largest chains." Kummer is the executive director of the Food and Society policy program at the Aspen Institute, a senior editor at The Atlantic and a senior lecturer at the Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.

Food stamp benefits could soon be used to purchase restaurant meals, prepared foods