More To Say After a story is reported, sometimes there's more to say. Host Doug Fabrizio talks with KUER reporters as they unpack stories they've recently published. You'll hear new insights, unheard recordings and what initially inspired them. It's kind of like a director's cut... the good kind.
More To Say

More To Say

From KUER 90.1

After a story is reported, sometimes there's more to say. Host Doug Fabrizio talks with KUER reporters as they unpack stories they've recently published. You'll hear new insights, unheard recordings and what initially inspired them. It's kind of like a director's cut... the good kind.

Most Recent Episodes

Who Owns The US-Mexico Border?

President Donald Trump ran for office promising to build a massive wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. The wall is projected to cost billions of dollars. But even if Trump gets congress to pony up the money, he'll still have to deal with the people who actually own the border. See, the United States doesn't actually own it. The federal government is indeed the largest landowner in the region, but most of the land itself is privately owned. And lots of those owners are against building a border wall. KUER's news director Andrew Becker recently traveled to the border learn why.

The Stigma Of Pornography

For the LDS Church, pornography is sinful. Church leaders preach that watching it will cause the Holy Spirit to depart from a Mormon's life, and that porn can break up marriages. Mental health professionals are still debating the dangers of pornography. But for practicing Mormons, the stigma surrounding it is evident. We'll hear the story of a man who decided one Sunday to talk over the pulpit about his relationship with pornography.

Hive Mind: Can Tiny Homes Solve Utah's Big Housing Problems?

On the next More to Say, we're picking up on a conversation we started last week about affordable housing in Utah. This is part of KUER's project the Hive Mind — where you ask our reporters questions and they try to find the answers. This time it's all about tiny homes. Maybe you've seen them on Instagram, those beautifully apportioned, incredibly small houses. Lots of people are obsessed with the idea, and some people actually live in them. But things get complicated for one couple when a nosy neighbor spots their tiny home in a friend's backyard.

Hive Mind: What Does 'Affordable Housing' Really Mean?

It's no secret that rent around Salt Lake City is really high. And if you drive around downtown, you'll see tons of new apartment complexes under construction. But the thing is, most Utahns can't afford to live in them. At least, not according to the common definition of affordable housing: about 30 percent of your yearly income. There's a staggering need for cheaper apartments around the state, but hardly any incentives to build them. Because those pricey places — they're not sitting empty. KUER listeners involved in our Hive Mind project wanted to learn more about affordable housing in Salt Lake City, and reporter Whittney Evans has been on the case.

People are Dying in Utah Jails

On December 1st, 2016, 21-year-old Madison Jensen died of heroin withdrawal in the Duchesne County Jail. She'd been violently ill, but no one in the jail did anything about it. Her death is part of a pattern — because Utah has seen more inmate deaths per capita in the last few years than any other state in the nation. And the way Utah jails are run is mostly kept secret.

Meet The 4th Grade Teacher Earning $70,000

It's hard to keep teachers in Utah's Monument Valley. It's beautiful there, sure, but you're hours away from a real grocery store or a movie theater. Now, though, there's a program to keep teachers invested in the community. And it's actually really simple: Pay them more. Jody Lee-Chadde teaches 4th grade, and they're paying her $70,000 to do it.

Vegas Vic: Salt Lake City Native

When you think about Las Vegas, you might picture casinos, opulent hotels and neon signs. Like the "Welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas" sign, Circus Circus or that huge cowboy on Fremont Street — Vegas Vic. Turns out, lots of those signs were made by the Young Electric Sign Company, headquartered right here in Utah. KUER's Julia Ritchey used to live in Nevada. It's where she fell in love with neon signs and even started a story on them. Although she couldn't quite finish it until she moved to Salt Lake City.

What It's Like Being A 911 Dispatcher

This week on More to Say we're putting out an episode we made back in November, about a police dispatcher. When someone calls 911, we don't really think about the person who answers. But the person on the other end carries a heavy burden. When something goes wrong, or someone dies, the dispatcher has to live with it.

My Piano Instructor Raped Me

Last February, a former student at Utah State University wrote a Facebook post. She said she'd been raped by an instructor in the piano department, and that the university hadn't taken her seriously. But then other students started coming forward, and now USU is changing how it handles sexual assault. Deseret News reporter Gillian Friedman and KUER's Lee Hale join Doug Fabrizio to talk about it.

Making More To Say

The More to Say team is small, and you're an important part of it. It's KUER's Spring fund drive this week. We're raising money for all of KUER's programming, including our podcasts. So this week we're playing a couple of our favorite moments from the podcast. Thank you for supporting the station.