The Academic Minute The Academic Minute features researchers from colleges and universities around the world, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy and of all the ways academic research contributes to solving the world's toughest problems and to serving the public good.

The Academic Minute

From WAMC Northeast Public Radio

The Academic Minute features researchers from colleges and universities around the world, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy and of all the ways academic research contributes to solving the world's toughest problems and to serving the public good.

Most Recent Episodes

Rodney Yoder, Goucher College – Building a Miniature Electron Accelerator Powered by Heat

In the future, CERN might be able to fit on your table. Rodney Yoder, associate professor of physics at Goucher College, determines how making particle accelerators smaller, could lower the cost of tech. Rodney Yoder is Associate Professor of Physics at Goucher College, where he teaches classes ranging from introductory courses for nonscientists to advanced physics labs, and is also the coordinator of a new interdisciplinary major in Engineering Science. He received his B.A. from Reed College, earned his Ph.D. in experimental accelerator physics from Yale University, and was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of California, Los Angeles. As a science faculty member at liberal-arts colleges for more than 20 years, he is committed to developing effective teaching methods and hands-on science courses while pursuing research that is accessible to undergraduates. He particularly values introducing his students to the excitement of experimental research and innovation. Dr. Yoder's research area is the physics of particle beams and their interaction with fields, with a primary interest in novel tabletop acceleration methods and measurement techniques. His current project, which is supported by a research grant from the National Science Foundation, investigates uses of pyroelectric fields for electron emission and high-gradient acceleration. Building a Miniature Electron Accelerator Powered by Heat https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-30-21-Goucher-Building-a-Miniature-Electron-Accelerator-Powered-by-Heat.mp3 The most famous particle accelerators are huge facilities, many miles long, that have enabled fundamental physics discoveries. They work by imparting very high speeds, and therefore high energies, to protons or electrons, using strong electric fields; the particles' energy is what makes experiments possible. But room-sized accelerators, producing electrons that are a million times less energetic, are actually far more common—they're used in health care, industry, and defense, for applications like radiation therapy and x-ray scanning. If electron accelerators could be made ultra-small, like a breadbox or even a computer chip, wider applications and uses could become possible at much lower cost—much like computers evolved from massive research installations fifty years ago to laptops and tablets today. In my current research project, I show how an unusual kind of material, glassy oxide compounds called pyroelectric crystals, can provide the necessary electric fields to produce and accelerate electrons to more than half of the speed of light in a few centimeters. Pyroelectrics have the unusual property that when one heats or cools them, they become electrically polarized, which means that they produce very large electric fields at their surfaces. The result is that a carefully chosen arrangement of crystals and heaters is all that is needed to create a small and simple, yet useful, accelerator. We can place a sharply tipped metal needle near or within these materials to produce a pinpoint electron beam, and use a series of crystals in a row to further increase the electrons' energy. In the future, these miniature accelerators could form a component of a smaller and more efficient research accelerator, or lead to innovative technologies like handheld radiation sources. The post Rodney Yoder, Goucher College – Building a Miniature Electron Accelerator Powered by Heat appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Rodney Yoder, Goucher College – Building a Miniature Electron Accelerator Powered by Heat

Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi – Your Brain on Virtual Reality

Virtual reality is here, but does it work for everyone? Bas Rokers, associate professor of psychology at NYU Abu Dhabi, examines the science behind the tech. Bas Rokers is Associate Professor of Psychology and the Director of the Neuroimaging Facility at New York University Abu Dhabi. His work has elucidated the neural mechanisms underlying visual perception, by revealing the links between sensory input, neural activity and perpetual experience. His research has informed technological innovation in the domain of virtual and augmented reality and has important applications in healthcare, improving the understanding and treatment of visual disorders. He has published extensively in high profile publications such as Nature Neuroscience, Current Biology, Psychological Science and Nature Scientific Reports. His research has been funded by the Netherlands Scientific Organization, the US National Institutes of Health, the US Navy, Facebook and Google, amongst others. Before his position at New York University Abu Dhabi, he was an Associate Professor at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and has held visiting appointments at Utrecht University and MIT. Finally, he is a science advocate and actively engages with the public, most notably by working on National Geographic's Brain Games TV series and the University of Wisconsin Virtual Brain Project. Your Brain on Virtual Reality https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-29-21-NYU-Abu-Dhabi-Your-Brain-on-Virtual-Reality.mp3 What if you could walk into a room full of strangers and see names and important relevant details floating above everyone's head? Augmented reality can make such a world possible. The technology may soon be built into glasses, for example, so virtual content can be superimposed on our view of the real world. Engineers are close to solving the many challenges involved in augmented reality. At the same time however, our understanding of the conditions under which our brains can or can not take advantage of the additional information is relatively limited. In a recent study at the University of Wisconsin – Madison and New York University Abu Dhabi we manipulated the virtual content displayed. We found that under naturalistic viewing conditions the brain exploits small involuntary head movements, which we call head jitter, to improve visual perception. For augmented reality devices to work well therefore, they should record your head jitter, and update the virtually displayed content accordingly. As an important aside, we found that commonly available virtual reality headsets do not work well for a large fraction of the population. Specifically, some popular headsets provide a poor fit to women. As a result, females tend to report a poorer visual experience and greater motion sickness. Our work informs the design of new virtual and augmented reality devices, and may help us better understand the neural mechanisms that are disrupted in perceptual disorders. Read More: Rokers Vision Laboratory The post Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi – Your Brain on Virtual Reality appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Bas Rokers, NYU Abu Dhabi – Your Brain on Virtual Reality

Megan Downing, Northern Kentucky University – Philanthropy and Benefits to Students

Giving back is a powerful way to help a community. Megan Downing, associate professor of organizational leadership at Northern Kentucky University, discusses how to get students into the act. Dr. Megan Downing has been with Northern Kentucky University since 2001. She joined the program as an Assistant Professor in 2015 after serving five years as NTTR faculty and as the program coordinator and primary academic advisor from 2010-2015. Dr. Downing also serves as the faculty advisor for NKU Chapter of the National Society of Leadership and Success. Dr. Downing completed her undergraduate and graduate studies at NKU with her B.S. in Business Education/Office System Technology (2002), Master of Science in Information Systems (2006), post-master's certificate in Higher Education Administration & College Student Development (2009), and her doctoral studies in Educational Leadership (2012) with her dissertation on Student Perceptions of Faculty-Student Interaction in Online Learning. Dr. Downing's scholarly activities have focused on leadership education and development, impostor phenomenon, service learning, student philanthropy, teamwork, academic advising, and online education. She has presented and served on panels at national and international conferences in the United States; London, England; Barcelona, Spain; and Montreal and Ottawa, Canada. Her scholarly work has been published in the International Journal of Organization Theory and Behavior, Journal of Leadership Education, Journal of Nonprofit Education and Leadership, and Journal of College Student Retention. She has also co-authored a handbook on effective teamwork and a book chapter on electronic service learning or "e-service learning." Her 2013 ATMAE Conference Proceedings Paper on Fostering Social Presence through Faculty-Student Interaction for Successful Online Learning was recognized as the top 2013 Conference Proceedings paper in the Distance Learning track. Megan is a member of the following professional organizations: International Leadership Association and Association of Leadership Educators. Philanthropy and Benefits to Students https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-28-21-Northern-Kentucky-Philanthropy-and-Benefits-to-Students.mp3 Over the past 20 years, NKU has taken a programmatic approach to incorporating a philanthropy component into our classrooms. Students are given real money, typically $2,000. They then identify needs in the community and nonprofits addressing those needs. The students in each class decide where to best invest their $2,000. Adding this philanthropy component has multiple benefits. There's the obvious benefit to the community. Our students have invested nearly $1 million in over 400 nonprofits. But the benefits to students are striking, too. They become more aware of community needs and more committed to addressing them. On the academic side, student success measures are improved, from learning course content to retention and graduation. With over 6,000 students over the past two decades as our sample, we are relatively certain of these results. But something disruptive is happening in higher education. More and more, students are attending class virtually. COVID-19 accelerated this transformation ... and made it more important to analyze whether philanthropy has the same benefits when added to an online course as when added to an in-person class. I examined this question, along with my colleague Dr. Julie Olberding, who directs NKU's master's in public administration program, by looking at course outcomes and student surveys. We found is that the philanthropy experience had just as positive outcomes for online students as with face-to-face students on various measures, including interest in the course, learning and applying course material, awareness of community needs, a responsibility to help others in need, and a belief they can make a difference in the world. As one student explained: "I have learned that working in a team for a good cause can help a lot of people. I am now more aware of organizations in my community that are out there to help others." The post Megan Downing, Northern Kentucky University – Philanthropy and Benefits to Students appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Megan Downing, Northern Kentucky University – Philanthropy and Benefits to Students

Caitlin Clark, Colorado State University – Chocolate Flavor Through Fermentation

On this Student Spotlight: Fermentation isn't just for alcohol. Caitlin Clark, Instructor and Ph.D student in the department of food science and human nutrition at Colorado State University, discusses another dietary favorite that makes use of this process. Caitlin is a Ph.D student and chocolate researcher at Colorado State University. Her research in the Food Science program focuses on cacao fermentation and post-harvest processing techniques. After earning a B.A. in Linguistics and Classical Languages at the University of Colorado, Boulder (2005), Caitlin lived in Madrid, Spain, working at the Spanish Department of Defense and other government agencies. She was drawn to fermented foods during her time in Spain, where she was exposed to traditional, time-honored practices of food preservation. Caitlin returned to Colorado and achieved a M.S. in Food Science from Colorado State University in 2019. This research was published in Scientific Reports as "Effects of Time and Temperature during Melanging on the Volatile Profile of Dark Chocolate". Her work as a Ph. D candidate focuses on the breakdown of cacao proteins under fermentation conditions. Caitlin has been asked to present her work at the Craft Chocolate Experience (2020) and the Lillian Fountain Smith Conference (2021). She expects to complete her Ph. D in 2022. In addition to research through Colorado University, Caitlin has participated in external research projects for the Heirloom Cacao Preservation Fund and gained industry experience as a chocolate-maker and farm consultant. Her teaching experience includes courses on Food Fermentation, Food Chemistry, Brewing Processes, and Sensory Evaluation. Having already dedicated several years of research to cacao flavor, Caitlin hopes to build a career working with chocolate makers and cacao farmers on improving the quality of their product. At home, she practices belly dance and is a terrible, but enthusiastic, cook. Chocolate Flavor Through Fermentation https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-27-21-Colorado-State-Chocolate-Flavor-through-Fermentation.mp3 Are you a chocolate-lover? Even true chocoholics might not know what their favorite treat has in common with yogurt, cheese, and wine: its flavors come from fermentation. Fermentation is the process of improving a food through the controlled activity of microbes. The food you know as chocolate starts its life as the seeds of football-shaped fruit. Farmers scoop out the seeds and pulp into piles or boxes. The seeds are now called "cacao beans". They ferment for about a week before they're dried, roasted, then crushed with sugar until smooth and ready to eat. So, let's go back to that fermentation step. Cacao fermentation is a multi-stage process. The first stage involves yeast. Just like the yeast in your beer, yeast in a cacao fermentation produces alcohol by digesting the sugary pulp around the beans. As the pulp breaks down, oxygen enters the fermentation and oxygen-loving bacteria take over. The bacteria generate acetic acid from the alcohol that the yeast produced. Acetic acid causes biochemical changes as it soaks into the beans, and that has a major impact on flavor. Finally, as the acid slowly evaporates and sugars are all used up, spore-forming organisms begin to grow. Cacao is a wild fermentation. Farmers rely on natural microbes in their environment to create unique, local flavors. This phenomenon is known as "terroir". Makers of gourmet, small-batch chocolate hand-select cacao beans based on their distinctive terroir to produce chocolate with an impressive range of flavor nuances. For example, one bar may be reminiscent of raspberries, while another has notes of toffee and raisins. Yet in both cases, the bars contain nothing except cacao beans and sugar. These impressive flavor differences are due almost entirely to the power of microbes. Read More: trimethylpyrazine.com Colorado State Food Science Department – https://www.chhs.colostate.edu/fshn The post Caitlin Clark, Colorado State University – Chocolate Flavor Through Fermentation appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Caitlin Clark, Colorado State University – Chocolate Flavor Through Fermentation

Jerry Malayer, Oklahoma State University – Why Do We Do Research on Infectious Microbes?

Why do we do research on highly infectious microbes? Jerry Malayer, professor in the department of physiological sciences at Oklahoma State University, explores. Jerry Malayer is a Professor in the Department of Physiological Sciences in the College of Veterinary Medicine and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Oklahoma State University. He also serves as the Associate Dean for Research & Graduate Education in the College of Veterinary Medicine. Dr. Malayer's research involves diagnosis, mitigation and control of bacterial pathogens and host-pathogen interactions. Why Do We Do Research on Infectious Microbes? https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-26-21-Oklahoma-State-Why-Do-We-Do-Research-On-Infectious-Microbes.mp3 Scientists estimate there are upwards of one trillion species of microbes on earth. This diverse population including viruses and bacteria is collectively called the microbiome, and it extends to every corner of the earth. Of these trillion species, about 1,400 are known human pathogens, able to cause injury or death; others are pathogens of animals, fish, birds, and plants. But in a world with a trillion species, where scientists have counted only one one-thousandth of one percent, how likely is it researchers have identified everything that might threaten us? Not likely. Understanding what these microorganisms do, how they do it, and how they spread helps researchers develop measures to detect, mitigate and control their expansion. Such measures are crucial to human and veterinary medicine. We need to understand how pathogens adapt, move from host to host, spread into new areas and infect new populations; are affected by conditions of weather and climate, even terrain; what variations develop over time; and what effective control measures can be developed. Think about all we have learned in the past century about how to prevent diseases based on understanding the microorganism responsible, where it is in the environment and how it overcomes humans' natural defenses. While patterns in nature provide clues, the tremendous diversity of the microbial world and the rate at which these organisms evolve new strategies for their own survival makes it imperative to study and understand each one. As we learn more, there's more chance researchers can apply that knowledge to emerging threats. Microorganisms are the most abundant form of life on the planet and extremely important to the health of the biosphere. In general, people have adapted to their presence, and vice versa. Some have capacity to do real harm, it makes sense to study as many as scientists can now, before the next threat emerges. The post Jerry Malayer, Oklahoma State University – Why Do We Do Research on Infectious Microbes? appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Jerry Malayer, Oklahoma State University – Why Do We Do Research on Infectious Microbes?

Dawn Gulick, Widener University – Innovating a Safer Way to Compete

On Widener University Week: Even elite athletes have been adversely affected by COVID-19. Dawn Gulick, professor of physical therapy, discusses a tool to help them get back to competing again. Dawn Gulick is a professor of physical therapy at Widener University's Institute for Physical Therapy Education. Innovating a Safer Way to Compete https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-23-21-Widener-Innovating-a-Safer-Way-to-Compete.mp3 The COVID-19 pandemic impacted individuals, families and communities everywhere. Among the groups impacted most by the virus was competitive athletes. Widespread closures meant that competitions were put on hold while the world addressed the growing pandemic. When it came time to slowly return to adjusted routines, face covering guidelines, while necessary, made it challenging to practice and compete in a state of high intensity. As a medical provider, educator and mother of a professional cyclist, we wanted to develop a tool that could help athletes return to competition. In collaboration with my daughter and engineers from Singularis Solutions, we did just that with the creation of the Achieve Mask. The goal was to build a device so that athletes could safely train and be able to have some semblance of normalcy back in their lives. A return to exercise not only keeps them physically healthy, but it's a major contributor to maintaining their psychological well-being. Unlike other face masks, the Achieve Mask was created with a unique and flexible nose bridge through repurposing a material similar to a SAM splint, a foam coated soft aluminum used to treat sports injuries. This contour feature, along with antimicrobial moisture-wicking fabric, creates a comfortable fit without impeding breathing. We produced the versatile mask in two versions worn by athletes who compete with and without a helmet. We made it available on eBay. As society was in the midst of the pandemic, innovations like the Achieve Mask helped us to return to our everyday lives safely. The post Dawn Gulick, Widener University – Innovating a Safer Way to Compete appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Dawn Gulick, Widener University – Innovating a Safer Way to Compete

Yamuna Baburaj, Widener University – How Companies Can Best Utilize Star Employees

On Widener University Week: Star employees are a boon to a company, but only if they pass on what they know to others. Yamuna Baburaj, assistant professor of management, explores how to best integrate top talent. Dr. Yamuna Baburaj is an assistant professor of management in Widener University's School of Business Administration. She received a PhD in Strategic Management from Drexel University. She has taught courses in international business and management at Widener since 2017. How Companies Can Best Utilize Star Employees https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-22-21-Widener-How-Companies-Can-Best-Utilize-Star-Employees.mp3 Companies often depend on star employees to sustain a competitive advantage and even change their fortunes. Star employees are top performers serving as repositories of technical, industry, and firm knowledge and have significant visibility in the external market, but they often change jobs frequently and may take key team members or customers with them when they depart. Consequently, less prepared companies suffer a severe blow when such talent leaves. My colleague and I explored ways in which companies can leverage the star performer capital and protect themselves against these situations by effectively integrating stars into their organizations. The research shows star performers who collaborate with other employees or have a breadth of expertise in several areas contribute much more to the overall development of the organization's innovation than stars who rarely collaborate. When stars collaborate with their colleagues in innovative ways, the latter's new knowledge becomes part of the organizational memory and the impact of a stars' exit is felt less severely. The key to success for companies is to design their work structure, hiring, performance evaluations, cultural values, cultivating teams of excellence, adopting a non-star philosophy, and designing compensation and reward systems so that they favor knowledge sharing, collaboration, and a greater loyalty to the organization as a whole. By reducing dependence on such performers and investing in developing pools of distributed expertise, a star's departure can be viewed not as a company failure or crisis, but as an opportunity for the company to follow new research avenues that were not considered before and to incentivize other employees to pursue new research directions. The post Yamuna Baburaj, Widener University – How Companies Can Best Utilize Star Employees appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Yamuna Baburaj, Widener University – How Companies Can Best Utilize Star Employees

Paul Baker, Widener University – The First Hints of Supermassive Black Holes Merging in Di...

On Widener University Week: Mergers don't only happen in the business world. Paul Baker, assistant professor of physics, explores deep space to find another. Dr. Paul T. Baker is an assistant professor of physics at Widener University. He received a PhD and MS in Physics from Montana State University, and a BA in Physics from Reed College. He is a physicist interested in detecting and characterizing gravitational waves. His data analysis research combines methods from physics, astronomy, computing, and statistics. The First Hints of Supermassive Black Holes Merging in Distant Galaxies https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-21-21-Widener-The-First-Hints-of-Supermassive-Black-Holes-Merging-in-Distant-Galaxies.mp3 Somewhere in the universe two galaxies are colliding. Each of these galaxies has a supermassive blackhole in its center, and over the course of millions of years after the galactic collision those two black holes get closer and closer together, eventually merging into one, emitting a hum of gravitational waves all the while. That hum will join a discordant symphony of gravitational waves emanating from every galaxy that merged in the recent history of the universe. This collection of overlapping gravitational hums from different sources is called the stochastic gravitational wave background. The North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (or NANOGrav) may be starting to hear that universal hum. NANOGrav is a collaboration of about 120 scientists, including myself. We use large radio telescopes to monitor a class of stars called pulsars spread throughout the Milky Way galaxy. As gravitational waves pass through the Milky Way, the space between the Earth and the pulsars is distorted. Space itself is stretched and squeezed by the gravitational waves, making some of the pulsars appear to move closer to the Earth and some to move farther away. This slight change in distance results in the radio pulses arriving a bit off schedule. Our most recent data release contains more than 400,000 pulse time measurements from a collection of 47 pulsars gathered over 12.5 years. Our measurements are showing evidence for a common signal affecting all of the radio pulsars we monitor. We don't yet have enough statistical support to determine whether this common signal is from gravitational waves or some more mundane noise process. The only thing to do is to keep watching the pulsars. As more data are gathered, we hope the significance of this signal will grow and we'll gain new insight into galaxies and the supermassive black holes in their centers. The post Paul Baker, Widener University – The First Hints of Supermassive Black Holes Merging in Distant Galaxies appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Paul Baker, Widener University – The First Hints of Supermassive Black Holes Merging in Di...

Shaakira Abdullah, Widener University – Re-Imagining Sex Education for Muslim Adolescents

On Widener University Week: Talking about sex can help teens navigate young adulthood safely Shaakira Abdullah, professor of nursing, explores one community that carries more risk when doing so. Shaakira Abdullah is a professor of nursing at Widener University. Her research interests include sex education, faith-based health promotion, health care disparities among U.S. minorities, and nursing student outcomes. She is the president and founder of Love Beyond Love, a non-profit organization developed in response to the ongoing struggle of premarital sex and relationships faced by Muslim youth all over the country. Through the organization, Dr. Abdullah offers a range of services including one-on-one coaching, youth workshops, parental workshops, and more. Re-Imagining Sex Education for Muslim Adolescents https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-20-21-Widener-Reimaging-Sex-Education-for-Muslim-Adolescents.mp3 Muslim Americans in this age bracket engage in similar levels of risk when it comes to sexually activity. The difference, however, is cultural taboos around sex lead to a lack of conversations in Muslim households. Avoiding this topic can often backfire and lead adolescents to learn from unreliable sources and engage in risky behaviors, potentially exposing them to HIV, sexually transmitted illnesses (STIs) or teen pregnancy. Born and raised Muslim, I know firsthand the challenges that young Muslim-Americans face today when trying to navigate the pressures of adolescence. My personal experience inspired my efforts to increase HIV and sex education in Muslim communities in order to develop an evidence-based sex education program to meet this groups' unique needs. My team and I led a two-day sex education workshop for adolescent Muslim-Americans in New Jersey, which is home to the second largest Muslim population in the country. I adapted an existing sex education program to include Islamic beliefs in order to speak to this specific audience. Through interactive activities and discussions, our program objectives were to increase knowledge about HIV/STIs and pregnancy prevention, help participants gain positive attitudes and stronger intentions to make healthier relationship decisions, and ultimately decrease incidence of premarital sex among participants. Our published findings showed that we met our goals to increase knowledge, improve attitudes, and start to build a framework to educate our youth on how to make safe decisions while staying true to themselves. The post Shaakira Abdullah, Widener University – Re-Imagining Sex Education for Muslim Adolescents appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Shaakira Abdullah, Widener University – Re-Imagining Sex Education for Muslim Adolescents

Ali Hamza, Widener University – Understanding the Future of Automated Self-Driving

On Widener University Week: Lighting and weather conditions can make self-driving cars struggle to see. Ali Hamza, assistant professor of electrical engineering, outlines a technological fix. Ali Hamza is an assistant professor of electrical engineering at Widener University. His research interests include statistical signal and array processing, radar signal processing, communication systems, sparse arrays, convex optimization, and RF sensing for assisted living and remote patient monitoring. Understanding the Future of Automated Self-Driving https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/07-19-21-Widener-Understanding-the-Future-of-Automated-Self-Driving.mp3 The reality of fully automated self-driving is within view. To achieve this, vehicles require high levels of perception of the surrounding environment. When coupled together, camera and Lidar sensing technologies can potentially yield accurate and precise perception of the surrounding environment and enable superior object recognition and ranging information for self-driving purposes. Their performance, however, is impeded by lighting and weather conditions such as rain and fog which drastically limits the operating range. Radar technology, on the other hand, shows the greatest promise due to its comparatively low cost, low power and resiliency in a wide variety of environmental conditions. In contrast to the other sensor technologies, radar is the only sensing modality offering 4D sensing capability including range, 2D angular localization and velocity. In my research, I collaborate with industry leaders to develop high-resolution imaging radar technology at a relatively long range to improve the safety and reliability of autonomous vehicles. The goal is to provide significant improvements to the overall radar resolution by developing new high-resolution 2D direction of arrival algorithms that will more accurately discern approaching objects such as pedestrians and other vehicles. This makes autonomous vehicles much safer and more widely accepted. My work is pursuing novel machine learning and AI algorithms to process high resolution radar point cloud data for reliable object recognition which had always been a challenge due to lack of available radar data. Exploring the capabilities of radar technology will bring us closer to the arrival of safe and affordable self-driving innovation. The post Ali Hamza, Widener University – Understanding the Future of Automated Self-Driving appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Ali Hamza, Widener University – Understanding the Future of Automated Self-Driving