The Academic Minute The Academic Minute features researchers from colleges and universities around the world, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy and of all the ways academic research contributes to solving the world's toughest problems and to serving the public good.

The Academic Minute

From WAMC Northeast Public Radio

The Academic Minute features researchers from colleges and universities around the world, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy and of all the ways academic research contributes to solving the world's toughest problems and to serving the public good.

Most Recent Episodes

Shinwon Noh, University of St. Thomas – Pathways of Peer Influence on Major Choice

Studio headshot of Shinwon Noh, Visiting Faculty of Entrepreneurship within the Opus College of Business, taken August 16, 2021 in St. Paul. On University of St. Thomas Week: Did you choose your major based on peer pressure? Shinwon Noh, assistant professor of entrepreneurship, says maybe so. Shinwon Noh, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Schulze School of Entrepreneurship at the University of St. Thomas Opus College of Business. Her research interests are cultural entrepreneurship, emergence of new occupations and organizational fields, and paradoxes in management. She is particularly interested in examining these issues in the creative industries. She has published papers in several academic journals including Journal of Media Business Studies, Poetics, Social Forces, and Journal of International Management. She received a PhD in Organizational Behavior from Cornell University. Pathways of Peer Influence on Major Choice https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-17-24-St.-Thomas-Pathways-of-Peer-Influence-on-Major-Choice.mp3 There is a large body of research showing that peers have significant influences on a student's academic-related decisions such as college major choice. However, understanding which peers are influential is essential to link theory to practice. In my research, we compare peer influence effects on major choice across five distinct peer types including spend time, close friends, holds in high esteem, has difficulties with which is a negative tie, and study partners. Using the data from a 3-year panel study of university scholarship recipients across 14 U.S. colleges who lived in a dormitory, we find that peer influence for major choice primarily flows through simple exposure. In other words, students are most likely influenced in their choice of major by the other students with whom they spend the most time. It is neither our friends, study partners, nor those we esteem who hold the greatest influence over our major choice. This may reflect a social comparison process that is driven by knowledge of and experience with our peers rather than friendship, antagonism, or instrumental connections like work partnerships. Through this study, we show that peers do play a significant role in college major choice and we identify the pathway of that peer influence which is spending time peers. The post Shinwon Noh, University of St. Thomas – Pathways of Peer Influence on Major Choice appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Shinwon Noh, University of St. Thomas – Pathways of Peer Influence on Major Choice

Mahak Nagpal, University of St. Thomas – Technosolutionism

Studio portrait of Mahak Nagpal taken on October 11, 2023, in St. Paul. On University of St. Thomas Week: Not everything needs a technological solution. Mahak Nagpal, assistant professor of ethics & business law and the Opus College of Business, says sometimes a human solution should come first. Dr. Mahak Nagpal is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Ethics and Business Law at the University of St. Thomas, Opus College of Business. She holds a Ph.D. in Organization Management and Business Ethics from Rutgers Business School. Prior to joining the faculty at the University of St. Thomas, she was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Center on AI Technology for Humankind. Her academic research considers the ethical implications of how employees, organizations, and society will ultimately use or interact with Artificial Intelligence (AI) in their everyday lives. In 2024, she was featured on the 100 Brilliant Woman in AI Ethics list. Technosolutionism https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-16-24-St.-Thomas-Technosolutionism.mp3 Around us, there is a growing rise in the rhetoric that Artificial Intelligence or AI can solve complex societal problems in unique ways. This belief has even been articulated by renowned technologists, such as Mark Zuckerberg, who believe that AI will solve society's most difficult problems. My research examines the consequences of this belief. More specifically, in what ways might we be overestimating the potential of AI, particularly to the detriment of human capabilities or ingenuities. While AI may bring many benefits in certain contexts, have we gone too far to the point where we are now overestimating the capabilities of AI, without realizing that in doing so, we may be harming ourselves? Organizational decision-makers that have such preferences for technological solutions are described to have technosolutionistic attitudes. Such attitudes have important implications for how and who gets work done. Preferences for AI adoption come at a cost, that of the quality and quantity of jobs available to humans. To avoid such negative outcomes, we need to ensure that when it comes to the development and adoption of new technologies, technology is not viewed as the only, or even a uniquely placed solution to problems. A more sustainable business model is one where non-technological interventions are explored before deciding upon technological solutions. Before implementing technological solutions, we should ask, is the problem that we are seeking to resolve, a technical problem to begin with? Or is it a broader social or cultural problem? Recognizing the benefits that technology can provide, while having a healthy understanding of its inherent limitations is key to being able to use technology as a force for realistic good. The post Mahak Nagpal, University of St. Thomas – Technosolutionism appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Mahak Nagpal, University of St. Thomas – Technosolutionism

Christopher Wong Michaelson, University of St. Thomas – Work Worth Loving

Studio portrait of Christopher Michaelson taken on September 20, 2023, in St. Paul. On University of St. Thomas Week: Do humans need to work? Christopher Wong Michaelson, Opus distinguished professor of principled leadership, looks into this. Christopher Wong Michaelson is a philosopher with 25 years of experience advising business leaders pursuing meaning and providing work with a purpose and he is the coauthor of Is Your Work Worth It? How to Think About Meaningful Work. He is the Opus Distinguished Professor and Academic Director of the Melrose and The Toro Company Center for Principled Leadership at the University of St. Thomas and on the Business and Society faculty at NYU's Stern School of Business. Christopher lives in Minneapolis with his wife, three kids, and two dogs. Work Worth Loving https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-15-24-St.-Thomas-Work-Worth-Loving.mp3 Have you ever thought about what you would do if you didn't have to work? Many people imagine themselves golfing, sewing, or traveling, but if you had to do those things all day every day, they would probably feel like work, too. To work is human. Even though it's increasingly popular to speculate about when technology will bring about the end of work, there will always be human work to do. Even if we can harness AI to write reports and train robots to make widgets, as long as we're human we'll have the impulse for work that enables us to create, care for, and relate to each other. As a philosopher of work, I'm interested not only in why people work but how work worth doing contributes to life worth living. For most adults, work determines our daily rhythms, occupies the largest share of our waking hours, and influences our status, standard of living – even our identity. If work is a fact of life, we might as well make it count. I've found in recent research with my co-author Jen Tosti-Kharas about work in the wake of 9/11 and COVID-19 that some people for whom work is a dirty word waste years wishing they didn't have to work. We've encountered other people who hope to discover their calling at work – only to find that it can be tough to make a living doing what you love. We've learned that work can be worthwhile in many ways – saving lives as a first responder, supporting your family as a financier, making toilet paper in a pandemic, or delivering essential goods to a front door. It may not always be possible to do what you love for a living, but the world will always need people to do work that's worth loving. The post Christopher Wong Michaelson, University of St. Thomas – Work Worth Loving appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Christopher Wong Michaelson, University of St. Thomas – Work Worth Loving

Danielle Ailts Campeau, University of St. Thomas – Entrepreneurship Across American: Suppo...

Studio portrait of Danielle Campeau taken for new faculty during orientation on August 14, 2023, in St. Paul. On University of St. Thomas Week: Entrepreneurs don't just live in bustling cities and sip chai lattes. Danielle Ailts Campeau, associate dean of the Schulze School of Entrepreneurship and a clinical professor of entrepreneurship, considers rural areas for innovation. Danielle Campeau is the Associate Dean of the Schulze School of Entrepreneurship and a Clinical Professor of Entrepreneurship at the University of St. Thomas. Dr. Campeau has a decade of industry experience in the medical device and specialty laboratory sectors, most recently serving as a program manager for product development overseeing the commercialization of novel in-vitro diagnostic devices. She also served as the founding Director of the Center for Innovation and Business Development at the University of Wisconsin-River Falls where she helped establish a business incubator and directed the regional Small Business Development Center. Recognized with the Small Business Development Center Excellence and Innovation Award and the Young Professional of the Year Award in 2019, she continues to inspire students and contribute to regional entrepreneurial ecosystems. Her academic work focuses on entrepreneurship education, rural entrepreneurship, the entrepreneurial mindset, and the intersection of science and entrepreneurship. She holds a BS in Biology, an MBA, and a DBA in Strategy and Management. Entrepreneurship Across American: Supporting Rural Startup Ecosystems https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-14-24-St.-Thomas-Entrepreneurship-Across-America-Supporting-Rural-Startup-Ecosystems.mp3 Imagine the backbone of America's economy not in bustling city centers, but spread across its wide, open spaces. Entrepreneurship in rural areas, which is often overshadowed by the urban narrative, is a tale of resilience and community. In these settings, where every new business is critical to the local economy, the right support can mean the difference between thriving communities and those left behind. Based on past research, it is clear that entrepreneurs in rural areas face unique contextual challenges and therefore may benefit from specialized support. In a recent study, my colleague and I explored a wide-spread but relatively unknown government-sponsored entrepreneurship education program that supports entrepreneurs in both rural and urban settings. This program, run by regional Small Business Development Centers, provides would-be entrepreneurs with the foundational basics of starting a business. Through an extensive analysis, we delved into seven years of data with this question in mind: Are these programs effective at increasing the likelihood of starting a business and securing funding and if so, are they equally effective in rural and urban settings? Our findings were revealing. Participating in these entrepreneurial training programs increased the chances of both starting a business and acquiring capital. More importantly, this boost was as strong for rural entrepreneurs as for their urban counterparts. This is good news for entrepreneurs in rural America – each state in the nation has a Small Business Development Center program and many provide no-cost or low-cost consulting and education for startups in local communities. Our study's insights lead to a compelling conclusion: small business development centers stand as pillars of local economies, offering not just advice, but providing key educational services to help entrepreneurs turn their visions into reality, irrespective of their zip codes. The post Danielle Ailts Campeau, University of St. Thomas – Entrepreneurship Across American: Supporting Rural Startup Ecosystems appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Danielle Ailts Campeau, University of St. Thomas – Entrepreneurship Across American: Suppo...

Seth Ketron, University of St. Thomas – The Marketing Power of VR

Studio portrait of Seth Ketron, Assistant Professor of Marketing, taken on July 24, 2023, in St. Paul. On University of St. Thomas Week: Don't like what's going on in the real world? Maybe try a virtual one instead. Seth Ketron, assistant professor of marketing, explores through a marketing lens. Dr. Seth Ketron's research interests encompass information processing, sensory marketing, virtual/mixed reality, and retailing, and his industry experience has been in corporate and store-side retailing (Gap Inc., Belk, the TJX Companies, and JCPenney). His research has been published in journals such as the Journal of Retailing, European Journal of Marketing, Journal of Business Research, Psychology & Marketing, Journal of Product and Brand Management, and Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services. He is an associate editor for Journal of Product & Brand Management and a member of the editorial review board for Journal of Consumer Behaviour. He has also coauthored The Reality of Virtuality, a practice-oriented book on the use of virtual reality in marketing and has presented numerous papers at conferences of the American Marketing Association, Academy of Marketing Science, Association for Consumer Research, Society for Marketing Advances, the Global Branding Conference, and Marketing EDGE. The Marketing Power of VR https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-13-24-St.-Thomas-The-Marketing-Power-of-VR.mp3 Virtual reality, or VR as it is often called, is an immersive technology allowing us to create experiences that transcend the limitations of physical reality as well as those of more conventional digital platforms. Marketers are taking notice of VR's potential to transform the marketplace. For example, VR is emerging as a viable retail channel, where customers can participate in real transactions. Making these VR experiences multisensory—that is, including scents or touch sensations in addition to visual and audial inputs—can activate a state of flow, where customers feel totally plugged into what they are doing. Research shows that this flow state—this "plugged in" feeling—leads to more positive outcomes for both customers themselves and the companies with which they are doing business. However, we must remember that the role of marketing is not solely to make money. Rather, our role is to maximize value, which we define as the ratio of benefits to costs. To that end, marketers often work to promote consumer and societal well-being, and VR can have a powerful role in those endeavors. For example, recent research has shown that the affordances of VR—immersion and telepresence—can lead to stronger connections with our world and increase agency to make positive change. This has been demonstrated in the context of sustainability, where players of a VR game designed around an Antarctic experience viewed the effects of climate change on ice and on local wildlife. After the experience, these gameplayers described a stronger connection to nature and also felt compelled to behave more sustainably in their own lives. Similar VR experiences have offered realistic and tangible representations of environmental and societal issues, which can be effective in making us think about how we can make decisions to better the world around us. So, whether we are hoping to make shopping more immersive and fun, or whether we are hoping to get people to be more sustainable or societally minded, VR can help us get there. Read More: [Google Scholar] [DeGruyter] – The Reality of Virtuality The post Seth Ketron, University of St. Thomas – The Marketing Power of VR appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Seth Ketron, University of St. Thomas – The Marketing Power of VR

Lindsey Swierk, Binghamton University – Lizard Adaptations Through the Lens of Organismal Ecology

On Binghamton University Week: How do reptiles of different sexes solve the same problem in different ways? Lindsey Swierk, assistant research professor of biological sciences at the Harpur College of Arts and Sciences, takes a closer look at anoles. Swierk studies the behavior and ecology of species in a changing world. Her work primarily focuses on reproductive ecology, sexual selection, and animal communication using reptiles and amphibians as study organisms, exploring both fundamental questions and their conservation implications. Swierk's research integrates an emphasis on the human impacts on species' ecology. She conducts research in the northeastern United States and in the Neotropics. Lizard Adaptations Through the Lens of Organismal Ecology https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-10-24-Binghamton-Lizard-Adaptations-Through-the-Lens-of-Organismal-Ecology.mp3 Anoles are the scuba-diving champions of the lizard world, able to stay underwater for more than 16 minutes. But for animals whose body temperature depends on the environment, time spent in cool water can have tradeoffs. At the Swierk Organismal Ecology Lab, my team and I research lizards in the Anolis genus in the Neotropics. We helped to document that semi-aquatic anoles can dive underwater for long periods by rebreathing a bubble of air covering their heads. This trait may have evolved to allow anoles to use aquatic habitats to escape predators, and we're looking closely at the functions and mechanisms of the behaviors and morphologies that may allow them to rebreathe underwater. Semi-aquatic anoles seem to have evolved a sex-specific tradeoff between finding safety underwater and retaining body heat on land. This represents what we behavioral ecologists call an 'optimization problem,' where animals must balance the costs and benefits of performing particular behaviors. New research conducted by myself, PhD candidate Alexandra Martin at Binghamton University, and Chris Boccia from Queens University suggests that the sexes differ in how they solve this problem, since females have longer dives than males. Longer dives mean that it's less likely for a predator to be waiting once the anole returns to the surface. Females appear to trade the physiological cost of cool water for that extra safety since they don't face the same pressure as males to look for eligible mates or defend territory. The ways that animals can adapt to environmental pressures are astounding and have continued to inspire humans to push the boundaries of bio-inspired design. We are curious and excited to explore these ideas and plan to examine the function and mechanisms of this trait and others more fully in future research. The post Lindsey Swierk, Binghamton University – Lizard Adaptations Through the Lens of Organismal Ecology appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Lindsey Swierk, Binghamton University – Lizard Adaptations Through the Lens of Organismal Ecology

Adam Session, Binghamton University – Deciphering Polypoid Genome Ancestry

On Binghamton University Week: Untangling the evolution of hybrid plants can be tricky. Adam Session, assistant professor of biological sciences, looks into some. Dr. Session is currently an assistant professor at the Binghamton University Harpur School of Arts and Sciences His research focuses on genome evolution with a focus on polyploidy and transposable elements. Deciphering Polypoid Genome Ancestry https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-09-24-Binghamton-Deciphering-Polyploid-Genome-Ancestry.mp3 If you are interested in science or have kept a garden, you're probably familiar with hybrids. Hybrids – common in plants and animals – contain chromosomes from two or more parent species. In some instances, including cotton and goldfish, these disparate parental chromosomes become doubled, a condition known as allopolyploidy. Unlike past methods of deciphering allopolyploid ancestry, which used comparison with related non-hybrid species, our method allows us to discover distinct ancestries by looking at genomic patterns in the hybrid itself. This will enable us to trace these genomes back to the parent species. Different species carry different sets of repetitive elements; therefore, if we find different repetitive elements in different chromosomes of a polyploid, we can identify the unique contributions of each ancestor. We applied this method to well-studied polyploids where all ancestors survive, like cotton and tobacco, as well as other species where one or more ancestors may be extinct, like strawberries and goldfish. In many cases, the ancestors of living polyploids are not known. Using our method, we can deduce the ancestral origin of different chromosomes by studying the polyploid genome itself and dividing the chromosomes into sets, or 'sub-genomes,' derived from their various ancestors. In addition to identifying the subgenomes, we can also reveal the order in which they were arranged. Polyploid genome evolution is not only important to understanding the biology of crops. The ancestor of all vertebrates was also polyploid, so understanding the complex evolution of these organisms informs our own biology as well as those of important agricultural and biofuel systems. Read More: [Binghamton] – The ingredients for a strawberry: New method traces ancestry of hybrids The post Adam Session, Binghamton University – Deciphering Polypoid Genome Ancestry appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Adam Session, Binghamton University – Deciphering Polypoid Genome Ancestry

Vipul Lugade, Binghamton University – Using Smartphones to Assess Older Adults Fall Risk

On Binghamton University Week: Preventing falls is crucial for older adults. Vipul Lugade, associate professor of physical therapy, looks at improving balance for seniors. Vipul Lugade joined the Decker College of Nursing and Health Sciences in September 2021. He is the director of the Motion Analysis Research Laboratory and an associate professor in the Division of Physical Therapy. Vipul's research includes the development of tools to remotely monitor activity, the investigation of body-worn sensors, evaluating concussions in adolescents and the risk of falls in older adults, and the use of large-scale datasets to optimize disease prognosis and recommend individualized intervention in a range of populations. Over the past 12 years, Lugade has also provided data science and software solutions to medical, academic and independent engineering groups through a company he founded, Control One, LLC. He previously held positions as a postdoctoral fellow at the Mayo Clinic and as an independent scholar in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Using Smartphones to Assess Older Adults Fall Risk https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-08-24-Binghamton-Using-Smartphones-to-Assess-Older-Adults-Fall-Risk.mp3 As adults age, they start to lose their balance. One out of every four adults ages 65 and older in the United States is likely to suffer from a fall, the leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injuries in that age group. As the director of the Motion Analysis Research Laboratory, we are focused on discovering ways to prevent these falls. A first step to prevent falls is to be aware of one's ability to maintain balance while standing and walking. The ability to do two tasks simultaneously is compromised as someone reaches their golden years. Key to our research is using the technologies in our smartphones to measure a person's likelihood of falling. Our goal is to create an easy-to-use app for helping older adults with balance-related difficulties. Using the app we developed, we use the phone's accelerometers to measure how much body sway is happening while a person stands still. Along with assessments, we can also deliver balance interventions through the smartphone application in the hopes of improving stability in older adults. To help us achieve this goal, our lab contains cutting-edge equipment to measure and analyze movement. One critical piece of equipment is a Computerized Dynamic Posturography, or CDP system, which measures "postural sway" by analyzing foot pressure, force and motor reactions. If individuals improve their sway after following the smartphone-based balance intervention, the program could be seen as clinically effective. Our study found that seniors could successfully use the smartphone app, and its development could be a boon to patient balance and well-being. We are excited to have the first step completed in a process that serves to help a set of people at high risk who are often disregarded or seen as fragile. Read More: [Binghamton] – Could a smartphone app help prevent falls in older adults? The post Vipul Lugade, Binghamton University – Using Smartphones to Assess Older Adults Fall Risk appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Vipul Lugade, Binghamton University – Using Smartphones to Assess Older Adults Fall Risk

Peter Gerhardstein, Binghamton University – Assessing Problematic Digital Media Consumption

On Binghamton University Week: How much digital media is too much? Peter Gerhardstein, professor of psychology, examines a new way to measure overuse. Investigation of the perceptual and attention processes that influence the formation of our perceptions of the visual world and of visual memories, and exploration of the structure and content of visual representations comprise the primary foci of Gerhardstein's research. He subscribes to the view that these areas' processes are interrelated. Current research in the lab includes investigations of both low-level perceptual development (investigating the development of contour integration, orientation sensitivity and other low-level vision abilities in infants and children) and higher-level issues relating to the ability to transfer training from screen media (video, television, interactive touch screens) to a 'live,' or 3-D person-to-person interaction, a situation in which young children have been found to underperform to a surprising degree. An additional line of work is focused on the extent to which long-term exposure to digital content may alter visual perception, including orientation sensitivity. As part of this exploration, analysis of the underlying information contained in different types of images (natural, urban, TV and online digital content of many types) is conducted to inform our understanding of how online content itself differs from information in 'real-world' images. Assessing Problematic Digital Media Consumption https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-07-24-Binghamton-Assessing-Problematic-Digital-Media-Consumption.mp3 Do you find yourself on your phone a lot? Has it ever crossed your mind that you could be addicted to digital media? Unfortunately, current tools that measure the overuse of digital media are outdated, not only in the way they speak about technology but also in the way they are created with specific antiquated tech questions in mind. Due to the rapidly evolving nature of digital media, these questions become outdated and less relevant to measuring media addiction as time goes on. To address these shortcomings, our research team has developed a tool that will make it easier for clinicians and researchers to measure digital media addiction as new technologies emerge. Our goal was to create something that reflects current understandings of how digital addiction works that wouldn't go obsolete once the next big tech change hits. We collaborated with the Digital Media and Treatment Education Center (DTEC) in Boulder, CO, to develop and test the Digital Media Overuse Scale, or dMOS. Instead of focusing on the tech, we built a set of skeletal questions that focus on psychology. Because of this, the tool is more versatile and can be applied to many domains of digital media, such as general smartphone use, internet video consumption, social media use, gaming, and pornography use. Clinicians and researchers who use the dMOS can make their investigations as broad or as granular as they'd like. Initial indications are that the dMOS is a reliable, valid, and extendible clinical instrument capable of providing clinically relevant scores within and across digital media domains. We will be conducting follow-up studies using the dMOS to garner more information and potentially expand the scale in collaboration with DTEC. We look forward to continuing to develop a useful tool in today's age of digital media usage. The post Peter Gerhardstein, Binghamton University – Assessing Problematic Digital Media Consumption appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Peter Gerhardstein, Binghamton University – Assessing Problematic Digital Media Consumption

Lauren Dula, Binghamton University – Checkout Charity Boom

On Binghamton University Week: Do you give to charitable causes at the register? Lauren Dula, assistant professor of public administration, explores this phenomenon. Dr. Dula is currently an assistant professor in the Department of Public Administration and Policy at the College of Community and Public Affairs. Her research focuses on gender, equity, and diversity in the nonprofit and public sectors. She combines traditional public administration themes such as representative bureaucracy, and organizational and governance theories with social theories from psychology and sociology in the study of nonprofits and the public sector. Checkout Charity Boom https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/05-06-24-Binghamton-Checkout-Charity-Boom.mp3 From supermarkets to retail, people in the United States are used to being asked for donations while making in-person or online purchases. Some leading charitable causes retailers have recently championed are relief efforts in Ukraine, Children's Miracle Network Hospitals, and the Boys and Girls Clubs of America. Checkout charity campaigns raised almost $750 million in 2022, with campaigns through Walgreens, PetSmart, and eBay being among the nation's largest. As a researcher focused on nonprofit management and charitable fundraising, my colleague Dr. Ruth Hansen of the University of Wisconsin, Whitewater and I wanted to know more about those who say "yes" to giving at checkout, which we call "impulse giving." We surveyed nearly 1,400 American adults to ask about impulse giving. Over half the respondents said they had given to charity within the past year while paying for purchases. Those who give said they donate about $50 a year. Among those who donate, the most common form of donating is rounding up their total to the nearest dollar. Another popular form was adding an amount, such as $1, to their order. Less common are people who purchase tokens for in-store display. Our survey found that women and Black respondents were the top-giving demographics with checkout charity. Middle-class individuals under 50 who have not attended college were also more likely to donate. These patterns contrast with formal donors or those who give directly to charitable organizations, who are usually older, higher-earning college graduates. While there is still more to study, the total raised from checkout campaigns has increased yearly since 2012. However, the frequency of donation requests at checkout may lead to complacency or annoyance. The numbers could take a dip when impulse giving isn't so impulsive anymore, and "no thanks" will become easier to say. Read More: [The Conversation] – Amid 'checkout charity' boom, some Americans are more likely to be impulse givers than others The post Lauren Dula, Binghamton University – Checkout Charity Boom appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Lauren Dula, Binghamton University – Checkout Charity Boom