The Academic Minute The Academic Minute features researchers from colleges and universities around the world, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy and of all the ways academic research contributes to solving the world's toughest problems and to serving the public good.

The Academic Minute

From WAMC Northeast Public Radio

The Academic Minute features researchers from colleges and universities around the world, keeping listeners abreast of what's new and exciting in the academy and of all the ways academic research contributes to solving the world's toughest problems and to serving the public good.

Most Recent Episodes

Emily Huddart Kennedy, University of British Columbia – We Can't Stop Climate Change by Ha...

Coming together is crucial to fighting climate change. Emily Huddart Kennedy, associate professor and associate head in the department of sociology at the University of British Columbia, exposes how stereotypes keep us apart. Emily Huddart Kennedy is Associate Professor and Associate Head in the Department of Sociology at UBC and the author of the recently released, Eco-Types: Five Ways of Caring about the Environment (Princeton University Press). We Can't Stop Climate Change by Hating Each Other https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/02/02-08-23-British-Columbia-We-cant-stop-climate-change-by-hating-each-other.mp3 When I interviewed residents of Washington State for a research project, liberals told me how much they hated conservatives because they don't care about climate change. And conservatives made it clear that they don't have much time for liberals' "performative" concern for the environment. Two popular stereotypes dominated my participants' images of how liberals and conservatives feel about the environment: conservatives told me they pictured liberals in a condominium overlooking a city, obsessing over their recycling, and boasting about buying over-priced produce at a local farmers' market. And liberals portrayed conservatives as anti-environment; as willfully prioritizing profit over environmental protection. They pointed to conservatives as the single biggest barrier to climate action. These two stereotypes do not encounter one another as equals. Instead, the stereotypical liberal is associated with more cultural power than the conservative stereotype. This cultural hierarchy is a significant driver of polarization over climate change – but one we each have the power to disrupt. The most effective way for civil society to contribute to dissolving a social hierarchy is through empathy. Studies of the process of destigmatization show that once we can see people as individuals with hopes and fears, we are less likely to deem them unworthy of our respect and recognition. With climate change, we face what Bill McKibben has described as the first existential threat to humanity. This type of challenge requires coordination and compromise – the sorts of qualities that emerge from relationships of trust and mutual respect. It is not an effective use of our minds and hearts to make moral judgments of one another's relationships to the environment. We need to recognize our common humanity and the immensely important common ground beneath our feet: a planet we all care about, even if we do so in different and sometimes incompatible ways. The post Emily Huddart Kennedy, University of British Columbia – We Can't Stop Climate Change by Hating Each Other appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Emily Huddart Kennedy, University of British Columbia – We Can't Stop Climate Change by Ha...

Victor Peskin, Arizona State University – The Politics of Prosecuting Putin

What would make the U.S. government hesitant to prosecute Vladimir Putin? Victor Peskin, associate professor in the school of politics and global studies at Arizona State University, looks into this question. Victor Peskin's teaching and scholarship lie at the intersection of international law, international relations, and comparative politics. Peskin is the author of International Justice in Rwanda and the Balkans: Virtual Trials and the Struggle for State Cooperation (Cambridge University Press). The book was selected as a Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title. He is also the co-author of Hiding in Plain Sight: The Pursuit of War Criminals from Nuremberg to The War on Terror (University of California Press). The Politics of Prosecuting Putin https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/02/02-07-23-Arizona-State-The-Politics-of-Prosecuting-Putin.mp3 Combating the crime of aggression—or the unlawful invasion of a sovereign state—has been a cornerstone of the post-World War II international liberal order. Indeed, the fundamental aim of the United Nations Charter is to prevent wars triggered by powerful states invading their weaker neighbors. To reinforce this point, American and other Allied prosecutors made the crime of aggression the central charge against Nazi and Imperial Japanese leaders at the Nuremberg and Tokyo tribunals. So, it is striking that Washington has hesitated to support a growing international movement— backed by the European Union and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky—to prosecute Russian President Vladimir Putin for the full-scale invasion of Ukraine. The invasion, a U.S. official acknowledged, is the "original sin that unleashed" the ongoing Russian wartime atrocities. Ukrainian courts have prosecuted some low-level captured Russian soldiers for war crimes. And the International Criminal Court is investigating higher-level Russian suspects for mass atrocities committed in the nearly year-long war. But no court exists with the authority to prosecute Russian leaders for the invasion itself. Yet, the U.S. government—internally divided on the question of an aggression tribunal—remains noncommittal. Although the tribunal would only target Russian leaders, the worry in Washington is that this could create a precedent, prompting scrutiny of the U.S. war in Iraq and future American overseas military action. Even if an aggression tribunal is established, Putin may never be apprehended and brought to trial. Even so, an indictment could come quickly, given the ample evidence implicating the Kremlin. In itself, an indictment, experts believe, could actually advance U.S. (and global interests) in three key ways: First, by further ostracizing the Russian leader. Second, by deterring countries, like China, that harbor designs on their own neighbors. And, third, by reinvigorating international commitment to the elusive ideal of a world without war. The post Victor Peskin, Arizona State University – The Politics of Prosecuting Putin appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Victor Peskin, Arizona State University – The Politics of Prosecuting Putin

Kristen McHenry, Boise State University – Burnout and Well-Being Among Healthcare Faculty

It's been a long road for those in healthcare over the last few years. Kristen McHenry, assistant professor in the department of respiratory care at Boise State University, examines this for those with other obligations as well. Dr. McHenry serves as a Respiratory Care educator with experience in both entry into practice programming and online degree advancement. She has been a clinician for over 17 years. She has served in various administrative roles within higher education in clinically-focused programs. Burnout and Well-Being Among Healthcare Faculty https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/02/02-06-23-Boise-Burnout-and-Well-being-Among-Healthcare-Faculty.mp3 Burnout among healthcare providers has been well-documented. However, higher education faculty members who serve dual roles, as both educator and clinician, have not been as widely studied. We examined and compared the extent of burnout among health science faculty at one institution and how this impacted their self-reported perception of well-being using validated survey instruments (the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory and the World Health Organization-5 Well-being Index). In respondents from nursing, community and environmental health, kinesiology, social work, respiratory care, allied health sciences, and radiologic sciences, significant differences were observed between faculty members who had clinical teaching responsibilities within their faculty role versus those who did not. Faculty on a 9-month contract also had significantly lower disengagement and burnout scores, compared to those who were on another length of appointment (10-12 months). There was a significantly negative relationship between the extent of burnout and the perception of well-being. The moderate prevalence of burnout, as characterized by increased exhaustion and disengagement, in this sample was attributed to three main areas of work-life: workload, control, and community; indicating a desire for greater support and resources from their respective institutions in these areas. The increased demands placed on faculty paired with less autonomy in their roles and less access to resources throughout the pandemic heightened feelings of burnout and a sense of being unwell. Though the study was completed during the COVID-19 pandemic, the findings have implications for faculty retention that exceed this tumultuous time period in higher education. Administrative efforts focusing on allocating a manageable workload and offering a variety of wellness activities throughout the academic year may aid in supporting faculty wellness. The post Kristen McHenry, Boise State University – Burnout and Well-Being Among Healthcare Faculty appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Kristen McHenry, Boise State University – Burnout and Well-Being Among Healthcare Faculty

Jeff Liebert, McGill University – Get Big or Get Out: How Farm Size Affects the Use of Sus...

How does farm size affect sustainability practices? Jeff Liebert, postdoctoral researcher at McGill University, looks into this question. Jeff Liebert is a Postdoctoral Researcher jointly appointed in the Department of Natural Resource Sciences at McGill University and the Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability at the University of British Columbia. Jeff recently completed his PhD at Cornell University where his work on agroecology drew on methodologies and theories from both the biophysical and social sciences. Using an interdisciplinary, mixed-methods approach, Jeff's graduate research explored the motivations and barriers to using agroecological farming practices among US farmers. Through this research, Jeff collaborated with farmers, extension educators, crop consultants, NGOs, government agencies, and other scientists from around the world. As a postdoctoral researcher, Jeff is focused on untangling the complex, spatially explicit ways that ecological, social, economic, and political dimensions of farm management interact to enable or hinder climate change mitigation and biodiversity conservation in agricultural landscapes across Canada. Get Big or Get Out: How Farm Size Affects the Use of Sustainable Management Practices https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/02-03-23-McGill-Get-big-or-get-out-How-farm-size-affects-the-use-of-sustainable-management-practices.mp3 In the 1970s, when former Secretary of Agriculture Earl Butz proclaimed that farmers must "get big or get out," organic agriculture in the United States was primarily a movement of small-scale farmers growing produce for niche markets. Today, organic agriculture looks a lot different with 15% of all retail produce sales in the US attributed to organic fruits and vegetables, and organic food sales totaling nearly $57 billion dollars a year. To serve an expanding market, large-scale farmers have entered the organic sector, prompting concerns that organic agriculture is 'conventionalizing.' This process (of conventionalization) describes how some organic farms are becoming increasingly similar to industrialized, conventional farms: that is, biologically simplified, highly mechanized, and export-oriented. To better understand whether conventionalization is occurring, we surveyed organic fruit and vegetable farmers throughout the US. Our analyses focused on farm size and the use of agroecological practices, which can improve agricultural sustainability by delivering ecosystem services, such as nutrient cycling and pollination. We found that the fewest agroecological practices were used on large farms, and that these farms exhibited greater conventionalization than small or medium farms. We also found that the probability of using specific agroecological practices depended on farm size, which has implications for policymakers seeking to increase practice adoption. Engaging in more interdisciplinary, participatory research with farmers, farmworkers, and other stakeholders can help bring agroecology to scale and co-create more just and sustainable food systems. The post Jeff Liebert, McGill University – Get Big or Get Out: How Farm Size Affects the Use of Sustainable Management Practices appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Jeff Liebert, McGill University – Get Big or Get Out: How Farm Size Affects the Use of Sus...

Morgan Shipley, Michigan State University – The Varieties of Spirituality

Spirituality comes in many forms today. Morgan Shipley, Foglio Endowed Chair of Spirituality and associate professor of religious studies at Michigan State University, surveys the varieties. Morgan Shipley (Ph.D.) is the Inaugural Foglio Endowed Chair of Spirituality and Associate Chair for Undergraduate Studies for the Department of Religious Studies at Michigan State University. Author of Psychedelic Mysticism: Transforming Consciousness, Religious Experiences, and Voluntary Peasants in Postwar America (Lexington Books, 2015) and co-editor of The Silence of Fallout: Nuclear Criticism in a Post-Cold War World (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2013), Dr. Shipley's research explores secular spirituality, new religious movements, and individuals who increasingly identify as spiritual but not religious. The Varieties of Spirituality https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/02-02-23-Michigan-State-The-Varieties-of-Spirituality.mp3 For the 85+ million Americans who identify as nonreligious,[1] or the now 27% of adult Americans who claim to be spiritual but not religious,[2] we encounter more than a rejection of God and faith. Instead, we uncover various ways that Americans who reject religious affiliation seek alternatives for fulfilling those aspects of life traditionally associated with religion: virtue, morality, individual awareness, and relational structures (such as those between humans and humans, humans and nature, humans and the sacred). Efforts to understand this growing segment of the American populace who describe themselves as SBNR forces us to confront a host of identities: from individuals who reject belonging to a religious system but maintain an expression of belief (such as I am saved by Jesus but do not belong to a Christian denomination); to many who appropriate, adapt, and combine spiritual practices (such as yoga and mindfulness) in order to improve individual wellness and collective well-being; to others who reject the foundations of faith-based belief but seek out expressions of secular spirituality and alternative sites for moral codes, such as humanists. For these groups, spirituality ranges widely, from being inspired by religion, to grounded in a type of nature reverence or aspect of secularity. At times, this directly mirrors religion absent faith in any type of higher divine power, as with atheist churches. Though still small in numbers, these spaces demonstrate how spiritual practice remains direly important for those who deny religious belief. For others, however, to be spiritual but not religious stresses both the absence of religion as well as approaches to confront questions of meaning, seek expressions of purpose, and construct ethical understandings of belongingness. At the heart of this secular spiritual quest is the pursuit of wellness—of mind, of body, and of spirit. When we consider the growing number of SBNR, it is vital not to forget this diversity, as well as the idea that spirituality is not about belief or the experience of religion, but the quest to be fully human. [1] See Gregory A. Smith, "About Three-in-Ten U.S. Adults Are Now Religious Unaffiliated," Pew Research Center, 14 December 2021, https://www.pewresearch.org/religion/2021/12/14/about-three-in-ten-u-s-adults-are-now-religiously-unaffiliated/. [2] See Michael Lipka and Claire Gecewicz, "More Americans now say they're spiritual but not religious," Pew Research Center, 6 September 2017, https://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2017/09/06/more-americans-now-say-theyre-spiritual-but-not-religious/ The post Morgan Shipley, Michigan State University – The Varieties of Spirituality appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Morgan Shipley, Michigan State University – The Varieties of Spirituality

Kathleen Lubey, St. John's University – What Does Pornography Tell Us?

What does pornography tell us? Kathleen Lubey, professor of English at St. John's University, examines this from a historical standpoint. Kathleen Lubey is a literary scholar and writer at work on piecing together the complex history of pornography. A professor at St. John's University and specialist in eighteenth-century literature, her teaching and research spans British literature, the history of sexuality, and gender studies. What Pornography Knows: Sex and Social Protest since the Eighteenth Century, traces currents of feminism and social justice in British pornography from the 1740s to the present. What Does Pornography Tell Us? https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/02-01-23-St.-Johns-What-Does-Pornography-Tell-Us.mp3 Two teenage girls examine a dildo together, marveling that its unwavering erectness makes it superior to a penis. A philosopher interrupts the consummation of a marriage to explain various theories of insemination. A man ponders the ethics of sexual violence before raping a sleeping woman. All of these scenes appear in British pornographic novels written in the eighteenth century. And they all defy our common assumptions that pornography lacks a conscience, that it deactivates intellect, that it is patently anti-feminist. These scenes make readers pause and think. Since the anti-porn feminist movement of the 1970s and 80s, it has become commonplace to assume that pornography does damage to people and especially to women, encouraging men to regard them as sexual property. One reason for this indictment is visual pornography's transactional treatment of real, embodied women. But another reason it appears so harmful traces back to what happened to those complex printed texts from the eighteenth century. Editors and book collectors across the nineteenth and twentieth centuries–all men—selectively reprinted and republished works from the past. They ignored texts that didn't prop up masculinity, and they strategically abridged others, making them less feminist and more focused on unimpeded sex. Knowing that pornography once regarded women as thinking, feeling people, how can we learn to perceive the feminist content of porn today? The post Kathleen Lubey, St. John's University – What Does Pornography Tell Us? appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Kathleen Lubey, St. John's University – What Does Pornography Tell Us?

Joel Christensen, Brandeis University – Women, Witchcraft, and Greek Myth

Differences can lead to fear and persecution. Joel Christensen, professor of classical studies and senior associate dean for faculty affairs at Brandeis University, examines women's stories from ancient Greece to the recent past. Joel Christensen (he/his) is Professor of Classical Studies at Brandeis University where he also serves as Senior Associate Dean for Faculty Affairs in the School of Arts and Sciences. He has recently published The Many-Minded Man: the Odyssey, Psychology, and the Therapy of Epic with Cornell University Press. Women, Witchcraft, and Greek Myth https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/01-31-23-Brandeis-Women-Witchcraft-and-Greek-Myth.mp3 Witchcraft has a long history of scapegoating women. Fear about women's power was central to ancient Greek misogyny in myth, focusing on gendered abilities. As early as the creation narrative in Hesiod's "Theogony" – a poem hailing from between the eighth and fifth centuries B.C. – male gods like Cronus and Zeus were depicted with physical strength, while female figures were endowed with intelligence. This gendered difference combined with views of bodies and aging. While women were seen to move through biological stages of life – childhood, adolescence via menstruation, childbearing and old age – men's aging was connected to women, particularly in getting married and having children. Suspicion about women centered on this perceived influence on life and death, but also included fear about difference. Mythical witches were from distant lands. Medea, famous for killing her children when her husband, Jason, proposes marrying someone, was from the east, a foreigner who did not adhere to the expectations for a woman's behavior in Greece. Her powers initially increased male virility and life. Medea learned magic from her aunt, Circe, who appears in Homer's "Odyssey." She lived alone, luring men with seductive food and drink to turn them into animals. Once her magic failed when faced with Odysseus' antidote, Circe believed she had no choice but to submit to him. These mythical examples overshadow the many lost traditions of women's healing and song cultures. While ancient women were likely subject to suspicion and slander for witchcraft, there is no evidence that they faced the kind of widespread persecution of witches that swept Europe and the Americas a few centuries ago. The later 20th century, however, saw renewed interest in witchcraft, often in concert with movements empowering women. If fear about women's power led to paranoia, exploring and embracing witchcraft has become part of reclaiming women's histories. The post Joel Christensen, Brandeis University – Women, Witchcraft, and Greek Myth appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Joel Christensen, Brandeis University – Women, Witchcraft, and Greek Myth

Darby Saxbe, University of Southern California – Dad Brain? How Fatherhood Changes the Brain

We've heard of dad bod, but how about dad brain? Darby Saxbe, professor in the psychology department at the University of Southern California, looks at how fatherhood can change the brain. Darby Saxbe is a professor in the psychology department at the University of Southern California, where she co-directs the USC Center for the Changing Family and studies families, stress, health, and neuroplasticity in her NEST (Neuroendocrinology of Social Ties) Lab. Dad Brain? How Fatherhood Changes the Brain https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/01-30-23-USC-Dad-Brain-How-Fatherhood-Changes-the-Brain.mp3 In recent decades, the hours per week that fathers spend in childcare has tripled in the United States – and it is known that children with involved fathers do better on a range of outcomes. But there is surprisingly little research on how fatherhood affects men. Does fatherhood reshape men's brain and bodies in ways that might motivate their parenting? In a recent study our research group embarked on a unique international collaboration. We put two groups of first-time fathers – one group in Spain, one in California– into an MRI scanner twice: first during their partners' pregnancy, and again after their baby was six months old. The study also included a control group of childless men in Spain. We found several significant differences in the brains of the fathers that did not emerge within the childless men. In both the Spanish and Californian samples, fathers showed decreased grey matter volume in cortical brain structures responsible for visual processing, attention, and empathy towards the baby. These new findings echo research on new mothers. In a study conducted by our collaborators in Spain, first-time mothers scanned before pregnancy, and again shortly after birth, also displayed brain volume decreases that were so clear, an algorithm could tell the brains of mothers and non-mothers apart. Changes appeared in many of the same structures we observed in the new fathers. However, brain changes in our fathers were less pronounced than the mothers in this earlier study – about half the magnitude – and also appeared more variable. Fathers' engagement in childcare may affect the plasticity of the fathering brain. More research is needed to tease out these questions and to figure out how best to intervene with fathers who may struggle to adjust to parenting. The post Darby Saxbe, University of Southern California – Dad Brain? How Fatherhood Changes the Brain appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Darby Saxbe, University of Southern California – Dad Brain? How Fatherhood Changes the Brain

Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez – The Puertoricanization of U.S. Higher Ed

Should Spanish be a domestic language in higher education? Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera, professor of humanities at The University of Puerto Rico-Mayaguez, discusses this question. Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera is a professor of Humanities at the Universidad de Puerto Rico-Mayagüez and 2022 Obama Fellow at the Obama Institute for Transnational American Studies in Mainz, Germany. His books include, Decolonizing American Spanish (Pitt 2022), After American Studies (Routledge, 2018), Paris in American Literatures (Rowman, 2015) and In Paris or Paname (Rodopi 2011). The Puertoricanization of U.S. Higher Ed https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/01-27-23-Puerto-Rico-Mayaguez-On-the-Puertoricanization-of-US-Higher-Ed.mp3 Jorge Durand once said, "Estados Unidos es un cementerio de lenguas" or the United States is a cemetery of languages. Millions of people in the United States are denied right to use Spanish and other languages as a part of public academic life. English-only policies exist to benefit the interests of certain communities and their institutions. In this way, US higher education foreignizes languages other than English, even when they are the local to campus. This policy truncates the knowledge that can be developed across disciplines; it privileges certain scholars and blocks others from participation. Many studies indicate that if Spanish were transitioned from a foreign to a domestic language in US higher ed, such a decolonial move would benefit many Latinx scholars but also the academy as a whole. Using Spanish, if so desired, in classrooms, in STEM fields, in research, as well as institutional communication, peer review, accreditation assessments, funding applications, admissions documents, scholarly prizes, publishing, etc. is a move that would create new conceptual maps, revise inherited ones, and institutionalize marginalized and silenced voices and their stories. Puerto Rican higher education has a sophisticated, fluid approach to language that does all of these things. Decolonizing the language best practices in the US, following Puerto Rico's lead, would cultivate students' experiences and sanction the identities they may perform, study, and seek knowledge about. Adapting the US model in correspondence to the Puerto Rican system would reach beyond the limits of English-only controls, while shifting the range of voices who can participate in the academy. Instead of forcing an English-centric, linguicidal system across all regions, what would the US academy look like, what would it sound like, si fuera puertoricanizado? If students could use and hear the languages of their communities at the local university? Haría posible que crezca su experiencia educativa. The post Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez – The Puertoricanization of U.S. Higher Ed appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Jeffrey Herlihy-Mera, University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez – The Puertoricanization of U.S. Higher Ed

Rahim Esfandyar-Pour, University of California, Irvine – A Health Monitoring Wearable Oper...

Removing batteries from wearable tech can open it up to more people. Rahim Esfandyar-Pour, assistant professor of electrical engineering and computer science and biomedical engineering at the University of California, Irvine, explores how to do so. Rahim Esfandyar-Pour received his M.Sc. and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University in 2010 and 2014. He is currently an assistant professor in the departments of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Biomedical Engineering, and Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering at the University of California, Irvine. He is also directing the Integrated NanoBioelectronics Innovation Lab. His multidisciplinary team applies innovative engineering solutions to address major challenges in modern life science. The team's current research activity focuses on Nanobioelectronics & Nanomaterials for soft and wearable electronics, Nanodevices, Nanobio-integrated technologies & materials for hybrid electronics-3D-tissues, and smart bioelectronics systems for personalized healthcare & energy applications. A Health Monitoring Wearable Operates Without a Battery https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2023/01/01-26-23-UCI-A-Health-Monitoring-Wearable-That-Operates-Without-a-Battery.mp3 Wearable technology is some of the most widely used devices and has since become a vital part of monitoring users' health. Because of the increasing popularity, developers have started to create novel devices to monitor consumers' health, such as heart rate, pluses, blood pressure, oxygen level and more. While these wearables have many positive aspects, the price and battery life make them inaccessible for many. Knowing how important health monitoring watches are, my team and I set out to research and create a wearable that would provide users with critical health data without worrying about the device's battery life. We accomplished our goal by using 3D-printed nanomaterials on flexible substrates to enable real-time and wireless monitoring of vital signs. To make sure our prototype solved the battery life issue, we made a two-mode device. In one mode, self-powering is through the use of nanogenerators that produce voltage through mechanical thumping or pressure, simply by tapping into the nanogenerators. In the other mode, wireless powering is by holding a smartphone near the device. Once the phone is near the prototype, it exchanges the data/power to/from the phone automatically. Due to the nanogenerators, highly sensitive pressure sensors, and multifunctional circuitry, the device is able to monitor and deliver health information anytime, anywhere. The prototype's battery-free, wireless, on-demand health monitoring features, combined with the low-cost materials, has the potential to help both customers and first responders during emergencies. Our prototype has the potential to disrupt the wearable technology industry and allow technology and healthcare finally be accessible to all. The post Rahim Esfandyar-Pour, University of California, Irvine – A Health Monitoring Wearable Operates Without a Battery appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Rahim Esfandyar-Pour, University of California, Irvine – A Health Monitoring Wearable Oper...