Cynthia Maupin, Binghamton University – Friendliness and Trustworthiness Matters When Form...

What gets you selected for a team project may be a surprise. Cynthia Maupin, assistant professor of organizational behavior and leadership at Binghamton University, explains which traits are most sought after. Dr. Maupin is currently an Assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior and Leadership for the Binghamton University School of Management, a Fellow of the Bernard M. & Ruth R. Bass Center for Leadership Studies, and a Fellow of the Center for Collective Dynamics of Complex Systems. Her research focuses on promoting effective leadership, leadership development, and teamwork processes for organizations. Friendliness and Trustworthiness Matters When Forming New Teams https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-27-22-Binghamton-Friendliness-and-Trustworthiness-Matter-When-Forming-New-Teams.mp3 Did you know that people who are friendly and trustworthy are more likely to be selected for teams than those who are known for just their quality work and personal reputation? In a recent study, we found that people who signal that they are both trustworthy and competent are the most sought after when it comes to forming new teams. However, signals of friendliness and trustworthiness are often more important factors for choosing future teammates than signals that someone performs quality work. We assume that people are selected for important tasks and teams because of the knowledge, skills, and abilities they bring to the table. However, this research suggests that people may often get picked because team members feel comfortable with them. When choosing future teammates, people may be willing to sacrifice a bit in terms of performance in order to have a really positive team experience. Our research focused on a cohort of MBA students who were first randomly assigned to teams, and then later asked to form their own teams. In those initial teams, students who used supportive voice signaled their friendship and trustworthiness—or their social capital—and students who used constructive voice signaled their quality work and personal reputation—or their human capital. As might be expected, anyone who was very strong in terms of signaling both their human and social capital were extremely sought after as teammates. Those individuals are doing all of the right things to establish that they're both trustworthy and a good worker. However, our findings suggest that when people feel like they can trust you, even if you're not necessarily the best worker, they're going to be more likely to want to work with you. These findings have major implications for the workplace. Having a positive reputation for good work goes a long way, but so does just being a good person. People want to team up with people who make them feel comfortable. The post Cynthia Maupin, Binghamton University – Friendliness and Trustworthiness Matters When Forming New Teams appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Cynthia Maupin, Binghamton University – Friendliness and Trustworthiness Matters When Form...

C. Michael White, University of Connecticut –MDMA Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD Patients

C. Michael White on March 15, 2019. (Sean Flynn/UConn Photo) Treating mental disorders may require some out of the box thinking. C. Michael White, distinguished professor and chair of pharmacy practice at the University of Connecticut, discusses a form of treatment that is gaining steam with positive results. Michael White, Pharm.D. is a Distinguished Professor and Chair at the UConn School of Pharmacy. His research interests are in drug, dietary supplement, and substances of abuse safety and effectiveness. His over 400 publications in biomedical journals have been cited over 14,000 times and covered by major media television, radio, newspaper, and internet sites. He has received national awards from the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy. MDMA Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD Patients https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-26-22-Connecticut-MDMA-Assisted-Psychotherapy-For-PTSD-Patients.mp3 MDMA is an active ingredient in the street drugs Ecstasy or Molly. People in dance clubs or raves like the surreal feeling they get from MDMAs psychedelic effects, the improved mood from serotonin release, and the feeling of bonding to strangers from oxytocin release. Investigators hypothesized that these same effects would benefit people with post-traumatic stress disorder who struggle to share their traumatic events or work through them with psychotherapists. We recently published a meta-analysis statistically pooling all the trials assessing MDMA-assisted psychotherapy with psychotherapy alone. Patients receiving MDMA-assisted psychotherapy reduced the severity of their PTSD symptoms by 22 points and were twice as likely to no longer meet the definition of PTSD by the end of the study than those with unenhanced psychotherapy. Furthermore, one year after having their last MDMA-assisted psychotherapy session, 86% of participants said they received substantial benefits from the combined MDMA-assisted psychotherapy, 71% had fewer nightmares, 69% had less anxiety, and 66% had improved sleep. However, people cannot replicate these benefits by trying illicit MDMA on their own. First off, most Ecstasy or Molly tablets have other drugs of abuse in them like LSD or methamphetamine which enhances the risks. Second, it isn't MDMA alone that works, it is MDMA allowing people to feel comfortable enough with the psychotherapists to reveal and work through their traumatic events with less panic or anxiety. Third, patients require careful monitoring and management from psychotherapists during the MDMA sessions to keep them safe. So, for the half of patients with PTSD not fully benefiting from psychotherapy alone, adding 2 or 3 MDMA-assisted psychotherapy sessions to the mix can make a big difference. The post C. Michael White, University of Connecticut –MDMA Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD Patients appeared first on The Academic Minute.

C. Michael White, University of Connecticut –MDMA Assisted Psychotherapy for PTSD Patients

Timothy Waters, Indiana University Bloomington – Rethinking Secession

With America once again polarized, secession is back in the headlines. Timothy Waters, professor of law at Indiana University Bloomington, examines secession and whether it could be a good thing. Timothy Waters is a professor at Indiana University, where he writes on secession and war crimes. He is the author of Boxing Pandora: Rethinking Borders, States, and Secession in a Democratic World (Yale 2020) and editor of The Milosevic Trial: An Autopsy (Oxford 2013). He has been a Humboldt Fellow at the Max Planck Institute in Heidelberg and an American Council of Learned Societies Fellow. He was a Peace Corps volunteer in Hungary, and worked at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia. JD, Harvard; MIA, Columbia; BA, UCLA. Rethinking Secession https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-25-22-Indiana-Rethinking-Secession.mp3 Scotland, Catalonia, Bosnia, Bougainville, Cameroon: Independence movements are often in the news. Even the U.S. – Texit, Calexit, Red states seceding or Blue states, depending. Most Americans are leery of secession: That's why we fought the Civil War! Of course, that was our second secession – the first was the Revolution. Whether a secession is just or sensible depends. There are good reasons not to support secession for what America's founders called "light or transient causes." But opposition often rests on unexamined assumptions. Secessionists aren't necessarily more nationalist, for example – often they're escaping someone else's nationalism. Secession can be violent, but it's the state's resistance that causes violence. Secession challenges the will of the majority. But majorities only exist because states have the borders they do, which also create permanent minorities. Sometimes secession is the best – or only – way to escape persecution, or resolve a difference in values. As the Declaration of Independence says, sometimes a people feel it necessary "to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another." The assumption we most need to reexamine is the idea that secession is failure. It isn't – it's change. Not changing when change is needed – that's failure. Instead of worrying that 'country X might break up,' ask why country X should stay together. If a state needs violence to rule people who wish to rule themselves, then secession isn't failure; it's an answer. The post Timothy Waters, Indiana University Bloomington – Rethinking Secession appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Timothy Waters, Indiana University Bloomington – Rethinking Secession

Peter F. Cannavo, Hamilton College – Climate Migration: Facing the Inevitable

Many stand to lose their homes and towns in the face of impending climate change. Peter F. Cannavo, professor and chair of government at Hamilton College, determines best practices going forward. Peter F. Cannavò works and teaches in the areas of political theory; environmental theory and politics; climate politics; and geography and the politics of place. Cannavò is the author of The Working Landscape: Founding, Preservation, and the Politics of Place (2007). He contributed to the volumes Liberty and the Ecological Crisis, The Bloomsbury Companion to Hannah Arendt, The Handbook on U.S. Environmental Policy, The Oxford Handbook of Environmental Political Theory, The Encyclopedia of Political Theory, The Environmental Politics of Sacrifice, and Political Theory and Global Climate Change. He is co-editor (with Joseph H. Lane, Jr.) of Engaging Nature: Environmentalism, Concepts of Nature, and the Study of the Political Theory Canon (2014). He is currently writing To the Thousandth Generation: The Green Civic Republican Tradition in America, under contract with The MIT Press. Cannavò has published in various peer-reviewed journals, including Environmental Politics, Environmental Values, and Political Theory, and has also contributed opinion pieces to several media outlets, including The Hill, The Huffington Post and USA Today. Climate Migration: Facing the Inevitable https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-24-22-Hamilton-Climate-Migration-–-Facing-the-Inevitable.mp3 As climate change makes more places uninhabitable, relocation, or climigration, becomes unavoidable. By 2100, some 13 million Americans may be displaced by sea level rise alone. The U.S. is largely unprepared. There's no coordinated government framework to manage migration. Government policy favors rebuilding in place after disasters, and buyouts focus on moving individuals rather moving whole communities and keeping them together. We see relocation as surrender or failure. The new federal infrastructure package provides some resources for relocation, including funding to move highways and drinking water infrastructure threatened by climate change and to assist relocation of Indigenous communities. But this is just a start. The U.S. needs a massive, comprehensive climigration effort, structured along several key guidelines. First, relocation should be planned ahead, over a number of years, rather than be an emergency reaction . Second, the impacted community must take a lead role in collectively and democratically planning relocation and choosing a new home. A migrating community should try to stay intact. Third, climate migrants must have safe, affordable relocation sites and not be crowded out by climate gentrification. Finally, climigration requires coordinated resources and institutional support at the federal, state, and local levels. Once unthinkable, climigration is now unavoidable. We must ensure that it proceeds as effectively, equitably, democratically, and humanely as possible. The post Peter F. Cannavo, Hamilton College – Climate Migration: Facing the Inevitable appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Peter F. Cannavo, Hamilton College – Climate Migration: Facing the Inevitable

Falk Huettmann, University of Alaska Fairbanks – Climate Change in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya

Climate change's effects will be felt across the planet, but what we can we learn from different regions? Falk Huettmann, professor of wildlife ecology at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, explores one area to see. Falk Huettmann is a Professor for Wildlife Ecology working on all continents of the world with over 250 publications, including 7 books. He joined the faculty of University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) in 2003 as an Outstanding Young Scientists, and teaches Wildlife and Landscape Ecology, Ornithology, Data Management and Predictive Modeling. He was awarded a Killam Scholarship as a PostDoc with the Geography Department, University of Calgary, Canada for his work on Grizzly Bear habitat future scenarios in the Rocky Mountains. He also was employed as a research coordinator for old-growth forests and endangered Marbled Murrelets with the Center for Wildlife Ecology at the Simon Fraser University (SFU) in Vancouver, Canada. In 2014 Falk taught Geographic Information Systems (GIS) with the Semester at Sea (SAS) on the Atlantic fall research cruise, and later worked for three seasons in Antarctica. He got research contracts for places like Russia, Mongolia, Central America and Papua New Guinea. He was a Research Ambassador to the U.S. for the German Federal Student Exchange Service (DAAD), and spent a sabbatical with the Australian Antarctic Division (AAD) in Hobbart, Tasmania, as well as with the International Center for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in Kathmandu, Nepal. Falk is a bee keeper and enjoys sled dogs living off-the-grid with his family. Climate Change in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-21-22-Alaska-Fairbanks-Climate-Change-in-the-Hindu-Kush-Himalaya.mp3 The Hindu Kush-Himalayas (HKH) are a globally recognized landscape; it includes ten peaks above 8,000m, including Mt. Everest as the world's highest mountain also affecting the global weather including the monsoon and jetstreams. The now-melting glaciers, snow and ice of this region run their waters downhill and create major wetlands, estuaries and ocean plumes. It feeds over 2 billion people – app. 1/3 of the planet's humans – through farming and fisheries. The mountains of HKH are the world's 'water towers'. More than 18 nations rely directly on the HKH for their well-being, and thus this region has global and vast strategic impacts – economically, socially and ecologically. HKH is an inherent part of the world's polar region and the heat budget as the 'Third Pole', besides the Arctic and Antarctic. Research done by the authors is in support of the complexity and deep subjects found in the HKH region and how those are tele-coupled affecting sustainability. In contrast stand mis-placed hydro dams, mining, new roads and railroads, as well as many other one-sided economic developments in places like Tibet and the Mongolian steppe affecting the ancient wilderness and its mountain biodiversity and endemism, diseases and old-growth forests. We also found that buddhism and shamanism are traditionally used for a better universe; spirituality and ancient taboos have a great conservation value indeed. From the HKH one can easily learn to be humble, to respect and treat Mother Earth well. One easily will experience the holistic connections that the human culture has with the surrounding universe. Already recognizing these details will help for betterment, healing, and eventually global sustainability for future generations in the Anthropocene. The post Falk Huettmann, University of Alaska Fairbanks – Climate Change in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Falk Huettmann, University of Alaska Fairbanks – Climate Change in the Hindu Kush-Himalaya

Kenneth Luck, SUNY Sullivan – Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracy theories are no longer just on the fringe of society. Kenneth Luck, assistant professor of media arts at SUNY Sullivan, explains why. Kenneth Luck, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Media Arts at SUNY Sullivan. He holds degrees in Political Science, Education, and Human Development. In 2017, he produced and directed "Opioid Nation: The Making of an Epidemic," which went viral online and was broadcast on WVIA-TV, a PBS affiliate station in Scranton, PA. He has worked in media for more than a decade as a photojournalist, public relations professional, and photographer. His research interests include media and science literacy, education, and qualitative and quantitative research methodologies. His current article, "When 5G Technology and Misinformation Collide," is currently featured in the current issue of "2600" – a nationally distributed magazine that focuses on technology. He lives in Honesdale, PA. Conspiracy Theories https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-20-22-SUNY-Sullivan-Conspiracy-Theories.mp3 It may be fair to say that conspiracy theories and conspiratorial thinking have become part of the political, social, and even health science dialogue within the United States in recent years. Additionally, although it remains impossible to know exactly when conspiracy theories first entered public discourse, the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries appear to be a time when conspiracies theories have gained solid footing in the minds of many groups and individuals. My research focuses in on attempting to quantify and identify when specific conspiracy theories have entered public dialogue, particularly in the area of print media. The findings of my research suggests that the emergence of conspiracy theories occur across the left-right political ideological spectrum within the United States and flourish in response to historic events, political trends, scientific knowledge, and – of course – popular culture. Medical mistrust and skepticism toward government health agencies, for instance, which conspiracy theories tend to fuel, remains a challenge to global health and safety. Additionally, conspiracy theorists tend to endorse the idea of a "powerful other," and medical interventions are often a top-down, group-level activity. Moreover, conspiracy theories may also present challenges for creating public buy-in for implementing current and future health interventions, such as in the case of vaccinations. What some researchers have long assumed was a fringe topic of investigation has now blossomed into a fertile ground for study. The post Kenneth Luck, SUNY Sullivan – Conspiracy Theories appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Kenneth Luck, SUNY Sullivan – Conspiracy Theories

Anna Amirkhanyan, American University – Are We Biased Against Government?

Trust in government is said to be at an all-time low. Anna Amirkhanyan, professor of public administration and policy at American University, digs down to find out if national trends are just spin. Anna Amirkhanyan is a professor of public administration and policy at American University. Her research focuses on public and nonprofit management, organizational performance, public-private differences, and citizen participation. Her book, Citizen Participation in the Age of Contracting: When Service Delivery Trumps Democracy (Routledge, 2018) offers an account of how contracting of public services has come at the cost of transparency and participation. Her articles have appeared in peer-reviewed outlets that include the Journal of Public Administration Research and Theory (J-PART), Public Administration Review, the Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, the Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly, and others. Are We Biased Against Government? https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-19-22-American-Are-We-Biased-Against-Government.mp3 The right to be critical of one's government is inherent in a democracy. But when not based on evidence, negative views of government institutions can be harmful for the government, the people, and the society. They can discourage individuals from paying taxes, complying with life-saving regulations, and seeking careers in public schools, hospitals, and law enforcement agencies. To test how strong Americans' bias against government is today, my colleagues Ken Meier, Miyeon Song, Jourdan Davis, and I compared how citizens evaluate the efficiency and effectiveness of government agencies compared to nonprofit and for-profit organizations, when they are presented with simple and unambiguous facts about these entities. We also explored if government is seen as less credible as a source of information, compared to nonprofit and for-profit sources. Our randomized survey experiment asked approximately 1,600 participants to read and comment on a story about one of the most essential of all public services: nursing home care. The findings took us by surprise. Not only were government-run nursing services perceived just as favorably by our respondents as services in the private sector, but the information that our subjects received from government and nonprofit sources was perceived as more credible than from the private sources. These findings are particularly vital during the COVID-19 pandemic when trust in government messaging has been subject to political spin often with life-and-death repercussions. Our study shows that clear and credible information from government and nonprofit sources can break through the blizzard of disinformation and help citizens to make informed choices. The post Anna Amirkhanyan, American University – Are We Biased Against Government? appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Anna Amirkhanyan, American University – Are We Biased Against Government?

Karla Loya, University of Hartford – Pandemic Teaching and Learning Should Be Inclusive an...

Fostering an inclusive environment is key during a time of crisis. Karla Loya, assistant professor of educational leadership in higher education at the University of Hartford, explores how to make sure no one gets left behind. Karla I. Loya, Ph.D. (she/her/ella) is an Assistant Professor of Educational Leadership in Higher Education at the University of Hartford. She has a Ph.D. in higher education with a minor in women's studies from Pennsylvania State University, and a M.S. in higher education administration from the University of Kansas. Her research investigates the processes, experiences, and decisions that lead to more inclusive higher education settings, interweaving three areas: (1) faculty and student experiences and how identity, social justice, and equity issues play a role in their success; (2) inclusive college teaching and learning; and (3) socially-just research methods and assessment. Loya supervises doctoral dissertations and teaches instructional development, professoriate, research methods, and dissertation preparation courses. Pandemic Teaching and Learning Should Be Inclusive and Supportive https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-18-22-Hartford-Pandemic-Teaching-and-Learning-Should-Be-Inclusive-and-Supportive.mp3 Best practices in college teaching delineate the importance of communicating clear expectations, selecting relevant content, engaging students in active learning, creating multiple assessments, and fostering a respectful learning environment. After the teaching and learning process was disrupted by the Coronavirus pandemic, many instructors had to pivot and learn new modalities of instruction. For many, most efforts were dedicated to learning new technologies and catching up with time delays. This meant that some best practices were left out of the new teaching and learning environments. More problematic, the pandemic created new needs and situations that demanded a different way of teaching. For instance, since the pandemic started, many students and instructors have reported academic, social, and personal struggles. My research highlights the importance of fostering inclusive college classrooms to ensure that all students are participants in the shared teaching and learning, in any modality. How do we then create and maintain inclusive, participatory classrooms when issues of equity, mental health, and uncertainty about the present and the future weigh heavily on students' and instructors' minds? To teaching in more flexible and supportive ways than ever before, we can foster a sense of belonging and community by creating spaces in our virtual or physical classrooms for students to engage with one another and with us. We also need to creatively think of ways to bring flexibility to assignments and assessment types, formats, and deadlines. The post Karla Loya, University of Hartford – Pandemic Teaching and Learning Should Be Inclusive and Supportive appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Karla Loya, University of Hartford – Pandemic Teaching and Learning Should Be Inclusive an...

Kevin Ketels, Wayne State University – Four Reasons Americans Are Still Seeing Empty Shelves

Why are consumers still finding empty shelves? Kevin Ketels, assistant professor of teaching in global supply chain management at Wayne State University, delves into the reasons behind the shortages. Kevin Ketels is Assistant Professor of Teaching, Global Supply Chain Management at Wayne State University in Detroit, Michigan. He is faculty lead for the program in Healthcare Supply Chain Management and study abroad in the Netherlands, Germany and Poland. Four Reasons Americans Are Still Seeing Empty Shelves https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-17-22-Wayne-State-Four-Reasons-Americans-Are-Still-Seeing-Empty-Shelves.mp3 Walk into any store these days and you're likely to see empty shelves, or less variety. Everything from sneakers to pickup trucks, books, boats and bicycles. I believe there are four reasons for the continuing crunch. First, consumer demand is up When the pandemic first hit in March 2020, companies prepared for a recession. Retailers and automakers canceled orders from suppliers. The unemployment rate reached 14.8% and consumer spending plunged. But something strange happened. Consumer spending rebounded, thanks to trillions of dollars in aid from Congress. 2nd, we have fewer workers Low levels of vaccinated workers in important manufacturing hubs such as Vietnam, Malaysia, and Mexico have caused production delays or reduced capacity. Third, there is a shortage of shipping containers Large steel shipping containers are pivotal to global supply chains. But they have been piling up in the U.S. and don't have a way to get back to Asia. The reasons involve a lack of workers and complicated customs procedures. And, the price of containers is up fourfold over the past year. 4th, ports in the US and around the world are clogged Right now, more than 60 container ships are anchored off the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, unable to unload their stuff. Ports are also clogged in New York, New Jersey and other locations globally. Normally, there is no wait. The short-term outlook doesn't look great Before COVID-19, global supply chains worked pretty efficiently to move products around the world. There are a couple ways we'll see relief – a shift of consumer spending from goods to services and increased global vaccination rates. I don't expect either to happen until well into 2022. The post Kevin Ketels, Wayne State University – Four Reasons Americans Are Still Seeing Empty Shelves appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Kevin Ketels, Wayne State University – Four Reasons Americans Are Still Seeing Empty Shelves

Joanne Dickson, Edith Cowan University – Goal-Setting and Resolutions

Having vague goals makes them even harder to reach. Joanne Dickson, associate professor of psychology at Edith Cowan University, determines how to stay on track. Joanne M. Dickson is an Associate Professor in the Division of Psychology, School of Arts & Humanities, at Edith Cowan University (ECU), Australia. Her main research focuses on mental health and wellbeing, particularly from a goal-motivational, prospective cognition and affect perspective. Goal-Setting and Resolutions https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-14-21-Edith-Cowan-Goal-Setting-and-Resolutions.mp3 Have you stuck to your New Year resolution this year? If not, join the club. Despite our best intentions most of us have given up by now. Recent research conducted with colleagues investigated whether personal goal processes promote mental wellbeing and sticking to one's most important New Year resolution. 182 adults took part in an online survey. We found: Two thirds of participants abandoned their New Year resolution within the first month. Just over half pursued the same (or similar) resolution as in the previous year. More than half the resolutions focused on either diet or exercise. Most of the listed resolutions were described in vague terms such as, 'to get fit'. And, personal goal flexibility predicted increased wellbeing over time (but not stickability). We may give up our resolutions because we are too vague when we set them. Setting specific resolutions including features such as time and place, provide mental cues to assist resolution pursuit. For example, "to go for a 30-minute beach walk with my friend every Monday and Wednesday morning" vs "to get fit." Also, linking one's new year resolution to more meaningful values, is likely to assist. For example, the resolution to lose five kilos will more likely endure in the face of setbacks, if it's linked to higher personal values, such as beliefs about one's health or appearance. Importantly, we found the ability to flexibly adapt one's resolutions in response to changing situations is associated with promoting one's wellbeing. The post Joanne Dickson, Edith Cowan University – Goal-Setting and Resolutions appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Joanne Dickson, Edith Cowan University – Goal-Setting and Resolutions

Olivier Civelli, University of California at Irvine – Preventing Morphine Addiction and Po...

The opioid epidemic has been overshadowed by the pandemic, but is still ongoing. Oliver Civelli, professor of neuropharmacology at the University of California, Irvine, determines a possible solution to helping curb it. Olivier Civelli is a molecular biologist, a researcher in the field of neuropharmacology and an educator. He is the Eric L. and Lila D. Nelson Professor of Neuropharmacology at University of California, Irvine. He is also a Professor in the Department of Developmental and Cell Biology at University of California, Irvine. He is most known for his work in advancing understanding of neurotransmission and his impact on drug discovery. Civelli's research is focused on understanding brain function and the identification and study of novel molecules involved in brain activity. He was the first to decipher the structure of a dopamine receptor, the D2 receptor, central to neurobiology. Civelli then invented the strategy that uses orphan receptors to discover new neurotransmitters referred to as reverse pharmacology. Utilizing this strategy, he was the first to identify a novel neuropeptide, orphanin FQ (Nociceptin) in 1995, which he showed to regulate anxiety. He has written over 450 papers and holds 30 patents. Preventing Morphine Addiction and Potentially Curbing the Opioid Epidemic https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-13-22-UCI-Preventing-Morphine-Addiction-And-Potentially-Curbing-The-Opioid-Epidemic.mp3 Over the past two decades, dramatic increases in opioid overdose mortality have occurred in the United States. This public health crisis is commonly referred to as the opioid epidemic The opioid epidemic was triggered by an over prescription of opioid painkillers for the treatment of chronic pain which requires repeated opioid prescriptions which in turn can lead to tolerance, physical dependence, and addiction. In our recent study, we learned that extract of the plant Corydalis yanhusuo prevents morphine tolerance and dependence while also reversing opiate addiction. Corydalis has been used as a painkiller in traditional Chinese medicine for centuries. It is considered safe We propose a way to curb the opioid epidemic. We found that when Corydalis is co-administered with morphine, it inhibits morphine tolerance, dependence and addiction. If Corydalis is used with morphine at the start or during pain management, there will be less need of morphine and thus less risk of addiction. This is important for both us researchers and society. Our study is done in animals and need to be replicated in humans If Corydalis does prevent morphine tolerance, it can help curb the opioid epidemic immediately. Since it is readily available for purchase, either online or in certain health stores. We will continue our research in hopes of finding results to help prevent opioid addiction-related deaths. The post Olivier Civelli, University of California at Irvine – Preventing Morphine Addiction and Potentially Curbing the Opioid Epidemic appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Olivier Civelli, University of California at Irvine – Preventing Morphine Addiction and Po...

Diya Abdo, Guilford College – Resettlement Campuses are the Future of Higher Education

What can be done to help refugees in this country? Diya Abdo, professor of English at Guilford College, delves into this question. Diya Abdo is a Professor of English at Guilford College. A second-generation Palestinian refugee born and raised in Jordan, Dr. Abdo's teaching, research, and scholarship focus on Arab women writers and Arab and Islamic feminisms. She has also published poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction. Her book AMERICAN REFUGE: True Stories of the Refugee Experience is forthcoming from Steerforth Press in 2022. In 2015, Dr. Abdo founded the Every Campus A Refuge (ECAR) initiative which advocates for housing refugee families on college and university campus grounds and supporting them in their resettlement. The flagship chapter at Guilford College, now one of several ECAR campuses, has hosted 66 refugees so far. The College will begin hosting 20 Afghan evacuees in January, 2022. Dr. Abdo is the recipient of the J.M. Kaplan Fund's Innovation Prize (2021), Campus Compact's Thomas Ehrlich Civically Engaged Faculty Award (2019), Gulf South Summit's Outstanding Service-Learning Collaboration in Higher Education Award (2017), and The Washington Center's Civic Engagement in Higher Education Award (2017). In 2018, she was named a finalist in the Arab Hope Makers Award. She has been making presentations about ECAR far and wide, including at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. She lives in Greensboro, NC with her partner and two daughters. To learn more, visit www.everycampusarefuge.net or see Dr. Abdo's TEDtalk here. Forthcoming Book — American Refuge: True Stories of the Refugee Experience Resettlement Campuses are the Future of Higher Education https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-12-22-Guilford-Resettlement-Campuses-are-the-Future-of-Higher-Education.mp3 Higher education is transforming the landscape of refugee resettlement in this country. Recent years have seen America's refugee resettlement capacity decimated: dozens of agency offices have closed or laid off staff, and lower refugee admissions have damaged community-based infrastructures. America needs to rebuild quickly to support increased refugee admissions and the thousands of Afghan evacuees already here. Refugees also face many barriers as they navigate complex health and social services without adequate finances or social support, and all while coping with trauma. They lack the credit background, social security numbers, and financial means necessary to secure safe and affordable housing upon arrival. Founded in 2015, Every Campus A Refuge revolutionizes refugee resettlement and enhances the educational, research, and service missions of colleges and universities. This higher education initiative partners colleges and universities with local resettlement agencies to provide newcomers with free temporary housing on campus as well as community support. Campuses are small cities with everything needed — housing, cafeterias, clinics, career services, and plenty of human resources — to facilitate refugee access to services beyond the usual resettlement process. Students, faculty, staff, and community members are vetted and trained as culturally-responsive volunteers to provide case management support. The result is a softer landing and more dignified beginning for newcomers. The flagship campus has hosted 66 refugees thus far; other campuses have joined the effort. Research conducted shows a powerful impact: refugees reported a greater sense of financial stability and belonging while student volunteers reported increased knowledge and understanding of refugee and immigrant issues. Guided by best practices and community-identified priorities, campus-based refugee support could significantly increase America's resettlement capacity and engage its students in meaningful credit-bearing opportunities. If only 10% of America's universities participated, thousands of refugees would receive integration support grounded in dignity and agency. Will your campus be the next refuge? The post Diya Abdo, Guilford College – Resettlement Campuses are the Future of Higher Education appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Diya Abdo, Guilford College – Resettlement Campuses are the Future of Higher Education

Frederick Engram, University of Texas at Arlington – Teaching The Truth Should Not Be Controversial

Teachers aren't always allowed to teach what they believe. Frederick Engram, assistant professor of instruction at the University of Texas at Arlington, explains why. Dr. Frederick V. Engram Jr, is an Assistant Professor of Instruction with a joint appointment in the Department of Criminology/Criminal Justice and the Center for African American Studies at the University of Texas Arlington. Dr. Engram also holds an affiliate faculty role in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies within the College of Education. Dr. Engram uses critical race theory to help make sense of the African American experience with racism within both the higher education and criminal justice systems. Dr. Engram has published his work within media outlets such as Blavity, Diverse Issues in Higher Education, and Forbes. He is also a TEDx and nationally requested keynote speaker. Teaching The Truth Should Not Be Controversial https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-11-22-UT-Arlington-Teaching-the-Truth-Should-Not-Be-Controversial.mp3 Teaching the truth should not be controversial! As educators we find ourselves at the crossroads of a real racial reckoning. Where we have the moral obligation to decide to tell the truth or to continue to protect the oppressive voice. All across the country laws are being placed on the books aimed at silencing the most horrific parts of American history. Why? Because the truth of our past does not fit the narrative of their today. 62 years ago, then six-year-old Ruby Bridges had to be escorted to and from school by U.S. Deputy Marshals. Six years of age means that young Ruby was merely a first grader. Meanwhile today, all across the country in school board and legislative hearings we hear white parents demanding the elimination of stories like Ruby's from textbooks. We see the smearing of critical race theory and the lumping in of all things related to American history as a means to eliminate them all. Critical race theory is not taught in schools.The only way for us to move beyond the horror of the past is to recognize its very real existence and how it is still affecting us today. No amount of racial neutral or colorblind rhetoric will ever bring us together. Pretending that the enslavement of thousands of Africans in this country did not create the racial divide that still breeds tension today is ill conceived. We need the work of Nikole Hannah Jones and the 1619 project just like we need the work of Derrick Bell, and James Baldwin. The truth about Black history is that it is also American history and white and other non-Black students deserve the same opportunity to learn about it even if it is uncomfortable. It is in our discomfort that we are allowed to grow. Read More: https://www.ted.com/talks/dr_frederick_engram_jr_black_joy_as_an_act_of_resistance https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/tvc/vol41/iss1/4/ https://scholarworks.uvm.edu/tvc/vol42/iss1/9/ https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1086482220938033 The post Frederick Engram, University of Texas at Arlington – Teaching The Truth Should Not Be Controversial appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Frederick Engram, University of Texas at Arlington – Teaching The Truth Should Not Be Controversial

Sal Agnihothri, Binghamton University – Harnessing the Power of Healthcare Apps Through Pr...

Should you share the health data your device collects? Sal Agnihothri, professor of supply chain and business analytics at Binghamton University, considers the risks. Sal Agnihothri is a professor of Supply Chain and Business Analytics in the School of Management, Binghamton University. He holds B.Sc. in Mathematics and M.Sc. in Statistics from Karnatak University, Dharwad, India, and M.S. in Operations Research and Ph.D. in Operations Management from the University of Rochester. His current research focuses on improving the efficiency and effectiveness of chronic healthcare delivery. He uses mathematical modeling and data science to understand the important features of chronic care delivery. Key research questions he addressed are how mobile health technology could be used to reduce costs and improve patient health and what policy changes are needed to accelerate the use of mobile health technology. His other research interests include managing field service operations, and process flexibility and cross-training decisions in services. He has published in leading Operations Management journals including Operations Research, Production and Operations management, and Health Care Management Science. Harnessing the Power of Healthcare Apps Through Provider Integration https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-10-22-Binghamton-Harnessing-the-Power-of-Healthcare-Apps-Through-Provider-Integration.mp3 Health-tracking devices and apps are becoming part of everyday life. But their full potential has barely been tapped. While they allow a user to collect and record personal health data, they don't typically share that info with a healthcare provider – and as my colleagues and I found, that can make all the difference. We teamed with a practicing endocrinologist to develop an app that allowed patients to monitor blood pressure and pulse readings in between office visits. The physician reviewed readings and recommended interventions or new medications if needed. The app also allowed patients and staff to directly talk with one another, enabling regular communication and joint-decision making. The results? We found that patients using the app reduced their systolic blood pressure more than patients not using the app. While the results are promising, it's important to note that the app alone doesn't do anything. What makes it effective is the fact that it opened up continuous communication between patients and doctors, and encouraged patients to take an active role in managing their health. Our hope is that these apps could free up more time for physicians, as support staff could probably handle most of the monitoring of the app. We also hope that these apps could provide a cheaper, effective alternative for those with chronic conditions who may not be able to easily get to frequent in-person appointments or afford the bills that come with it. The surface is just being scratched in this subject, which could ultimately have major impacts on the U.S. healthcare system. The post Sal Agnihothri, Binghamton University – Harnessing the Power of Healthcare Apps Through Provider Integration appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Sal Agnihothri, Binghamton University – Harnessing the Power of Healthcare Apps Through Pr...

Arran Caza, University of North Carolina Greensboro – The Best Way to Educate Future Busin...

How do we best educate future business leaders? Arran Caza, associate professor of management at the University of North Carolina Greensboro, outlines why the answer might be different than you think. Arran Caza is an Associate Professor of Management in the Bryan School of Business and Economics at UNC Greensboro (UNCG). He also is a faculty affiliate of the UNCG Gerontology Program. His research examines leaders, with an emphasis on leadership development and effects of age on leadership dynamics. He earned his PhD in management and psychology from the University of Michigan, his MA in psychology from the University of Michigan, and his BSc in economics from the University of Ottawa. He has researched and taught on three continents, and had the opportunity to work with a variety of organizations, including Great-West Life Assurance, New Flyer, Manitoba Hydro, CH2M Hill, the RCMP, the Justice Institute of British Columbia, Bank Mandiri, and Support EXP. Before becoming an academic, he worked in program evaluation, health promotion, and law enforcement. The Best Way to Educate Future Business Leaders https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-07-22-UNC-Greensboro-The-Best-Way-to-Educate-Future-Business-Leaders.mp3 Did you know the world's 1,200 largest corporations generate five trillion dollars in negative ecological costs annually — 50% worse than five years ago? Inequality is growing within and between countries. And in one global survey, only 17% of employees felt engaged in their work. We can do better. And traditional business education isn't helping. Management students engage in less critical thinking than other university students, and they tend to become more selfish, more profit-oriented, and less ethical during their studies. As a result, ethics training, alternative management and critical studies courses are mandatory in many schools. Unfortunately, telling a person they should change their beliefs often doesn't work. In fact, a person told they need to do better is just as likely to resist as they are to try to change. So, my colleagues and I have been looking for a better option. The most promising involved simultaneously teaching three different management approaches to the same group of students. Financial Bottom Line: Businesses should make all decisions to maximize profit Triple Bottom Line: Financial, social, and ecological well-being should be equally important Social & Ecological Thought: Businesses should make enough money to survive but not maximize profit My students' views changed a lot from the start of the semester in which they learned about all three approaches. Some, sadly, became even more profit oriented. But the most common changes were away from maximizing profit and toward business playing a role in improving social and ecological well-being. While the students in other business courses likely became more selfish, the ones exposed to multiple perspectives came to believe that business could play a positive role in the world. The post Arran Caza, University of North Carolina Greensboro – The Best Way to Educate Future Business Leaders appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Arran Caza, University of North Carolina Greensboro – The Best Way to Educate Future Busin...

Alanah Mitchell, Drake University – Planning for the Best of Both Worlds in the Hybrid Workplace

Hybrid workplaces could be the way of the future. Alanah Mitchell, associate professor of information management and business analytics at Drake University, examines how to make them successful. Alanah Mitchell is the Aliber Distinguished Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of Information Management and Business Analytics in the College of Business and Public Administration at Drake University. Dr. Mitchell's research focuses on the design, implementation, and use of information and communications technologies (ICT) for collaboration, specifically in global virtual teams. She has published over 50 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and conference proceedings. Dr. Mitchell regularly teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses in the areas of information systems and technology. Her research and teaching experience extends to executive education as well as speaking and other consulting projects. Planning for the Best of Both Worlds in the Hybrid Workplace https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-06-22-Drake-Planning-for-the-Best-of-Both-Worlds-in-the-Hybrid-Workplace.mp3 The COVID-19 pandemic impacted organizations around the world, sending many employees out of the office to work from home. This transition from in-office work and collaboration to work-from-home and remote or virtual collaboration happened swiftly without much time for planning and preparation. As we look towards the post-pandemic future of the workplace, many employees are looking forward to returning to the office full-time while many others are interested in continuing to take advantage of the benefits of remote work, to some extent, resulting in the organizational adoption of hybrid work policies allowing for a combination of in-office and remote work. Fortunately, there have been decades of research studies exploring how to make virtual or remote work collaborations successful. Together with my colleague, we have identified several key insights for the planning of a successful hybrid workplace. First, organizational leaders need to establish and support flexible work processes by providing employees with the resources and support they need to be effective both in and out of the office. Establishing clear communication channels and processes is a critical piece of this plan. Second, leaders need to intentionally emphasize and monitor team culture and development. Leaders need to pay careful attention that subgroups don't emerge based on employees in the office versus those out of the office. Leaders also need to ask for regular feedback and recognize and celebrate hybrid successes. Finally, leaders need to plan for regular synchronous activity. Time spent together allows for the development of trust and confidence that is necessary for asynchronous work. However, synchronous meeting time should be thoughtfully planned so that it is recognized as valuable time spent together. Overall, while preparation and planning for hybrid work does not guarantee success, intentional efforts can make the transition to a hybrid workplace more seamless. The post Alanah Mitchell, Drake University – Planning for the Best of Both Worlds in the Hybrid Workplace appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Alanah Mitchell, Drake University – Planning for the Best of Both Worlds in the Hybrid Workplace

Deborah Bennett, Berklee College of Music – Gender-Neutral Language

How do languages of the past stack up to today's new social norms? Deborah Bennett, professor of liberal arts at the Berklee College of Music, explores limits of teaching languages with only male or female pronouns. Deborah J. Bennett is a Professor of Language and Literature at Berklee College of Music. Her poems and translations have appeared in Salamander, Connotations Press Online, La GuaGua and elsewhere. Her prose has appeared on Edify, Only a Game and Cognoscenti among others. With Simone Pilon, she has co-authored and presented research on gender inclusive terminology in Romance languages Ideating Pedagogy in Troubled Times and at the Pacific Asian Modern Language Association Annual Conference Gender-Neutral Language https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/02/02-09-21-Berklee-Gender-Neutral-Language.mp3 As educators in the United States seeking to create a more inclusive environment, Romance language instructors are caught in a bind. Languages like Spanish and French are rooted in a binary vision of the world. People, objects, adjectives, and articles are either male or female. In English, the discussion around gender neutral language focuses on pronouns; in Romance languages it is more complicated. The evolution of the discussion of gender-neutral language in French and Spanish starts with the efforts of feminists who have sought to create gender inclusive terms to make women more visible in language and not rely on the masculine form as the universal marker for all people. Efforts to create gender neutral forms have come out of the LGBTQ community and the younger generation. Early adapters of non-binary language in Spanish used symbols such as the @ sign or an x in place of the masculine -o and feminine -a endings, a famous example being Latinx. However, the question of pronunciation in spoken language creates a challenge and recent efforts have focused on the -e ending, which is already gender-neutral. The academies that regulate Spanish and French have rejected these "unnecessary" changes and insist that the masculine is, oxymoronically, gender neutral. As researchers and language instructors, we have been forced to make a choice between the standards issued by the Academy and the need to acknowledge the existence of women and gender queer individuals in the classroom. We discovered that these norms are being developed in places such as Québec and Argentina, thus making it clear that change is being driven by stakeholders of the language and culture. This conversation is only just beginning, and as the use of gender-inclusive and gender-neutral language takes root in the Spanish- and French-speaking worlds, we expect to see even more evolution of these living languages. The post Deborah Bennett, Berklee College of Music – Gender-Neutral Language appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Deborah Bennett, Berklee College of Music – Gender-Neutral Language

Melissa Wells, Empire State College – The Prevalence of UDL Techniques in Virtual Formats

We have many ways to present information for students in today's world. Melissa Wells, assistant professor in the department of education studies at SUNY Empire State College, discusses why different students may need different learning techniques. Melissa Wells is an Assistant Professor at SUNY Empire State College in the Educational Studies Department. She is an online professor and Subject Matter Expert in special education coursework at Liberty University. Prior to her work in Higher Education, Melissa was a special educator in the New York City Department of Education. She currently resides in New York City with her husband and three young children. The Prevalence of UDL Techniques in Virtual Formats https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-04-22-Empire-State-Prevalence-of-UDL-Techniques-in-Virtual-Formats.mp3 College students are more diverse in race, ethnicity, and ability than ever before. It is imperative that higher education is aware of the needs of incoming students and has a plan and a guiding framework to ensure that all students are provided the supports they need to achieve the high standards of the learning institution. Universal Design for Learning or UDL, is a scientifically validated framework aimed at increasing the learning experience for individuals, by offering flexibility in the way information is presented, in the way students and educators are engaged, and in the modes in which students and educators can respond or demonstrate learning. Thus, there is an increased urgency for implementation and the scaling up of UDL in higher education. To best support diverse learners, this research asks the questions: what is the student-reported prevalence of UDL techniques in Higher Education in various learning modes (independent study, online course, virtual study group); and which mode of learning demonstrates the highest UDL techniques compliance? Student perceptions of UDL techniques in their various modes of studies were gathered and analyzed for the highest UDL usage and compliance to inform future practices in higher education. Based on a survey sent to undergraduate students, compliance for UDL techniques is most prevalent in Virtual Study groups, however, this mode is the least frequently utilized mode of study. Online courses lead the pack in providing clear guidelines and/or evaluation rubrics for all major course assignments (how assignments are structured, submitted, and graded. While independent studies are best at providing a course syllabus that identifies all course requirements, course expectations, and due dates. Qualitative data, collected through open-ended questions, suggest that flexibility in scheduling, relationships with the professor, and clear and specific assignment expectations and feedback create the most successful environments for higher education learners. Read More: Implementing UDL Changes in Your Classes The post Melissa Wells, Empire State College – The Prevalence of UDL Techniques in Virtual Formats appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Melissa Wells, Empire State College – The Prevalence of UDL Techniques in Virtual Formats

Guangqing Chi, Penn State University – Infrastructure in Rural Alaska

Fixing infrastructure in rural areas can be difficult. Guangping Chi, professor of rural sociology and demography at Penn State University, explores why. Guangqing Chi is a Professor of Rural Sociology and Demography and Director of the Computational and Spatial Analysis Core at The Pennsylvania State University. His research seeks to understand the interactions between human populations and the built and natural environments and to identify important social, environmental, infrastructural, and institutional assets to help vulnerable populations adapt and become resilient to environmental changes. His research has been supported by more than $50 million grants, including the $3 million multi-institutional transdisciplinary POLARIS project funded by the National Science Foundation, to investigate environmental migration and food security in response to climate change. He has published over 120 publications including more than 70 peer-reviewed journal articles, contributing to foundational advances in environmental demography and population-infrastructure nexus. His work is often collaborative and transdisciplinary, aiming to create significant impacts through the integration of research, education, community engagement and outreach, and sometimes international collaboration. Infrastructure in Rural Alaska https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/01-03-22-Penn-State-Infrastructure-in-Rural-Alaska.mp3 Bridges have become increasingly critical for remote communities in Alaska where road networks are limited or non-existent. Rural residents frequently need to cross rivers or lakes to hunt and gather traditional foods and access schools, healthcare facilities, and other essential services typically available in nearby regional hubs. Travel by boat is common during warmer months, while frozen water bodies serve as transportation corridors during the winter. Climate change is causing rivers and lakes to freeze later, thaw earlier, and form thinner ice. Unpredictable ice limits when and where people can travel and increases the risk of snowmobile fatalities. Bridges can provide safer transportation options. But building and maintaining bridges in remote areas of Alaska comes with both social science and engineering challenges. From a social science perspective, significant cooperation and capital are required to secure financial resources for bridge construction. From an engineering perspective, bridges are particularly sensitive to seasonal freezing effects, which can quickly change their mechanical properties and structural integrity. To enhance community resilience to climate change, new infrastructure is needed in Alaska. But infrastructure construction, especially in rural Alaska, comes with a hefty price tag. The cost of delivering steel and concrete to a remote location, the sourcing of available local materials, and the cost of bringing in outside specialized labor can significantly increase the cost of a bridge in rural Alaska. The recently passed Infrastructure Act will allocate Alaska $225 million to address 140 structurally deficient bridges. Given the high cost to build and maintain bridges in rural Alaska, this funding is a good start, but is hardly sufficient. Our team is working to propose solutions to guide successful bridge development for Alaskan remote communities. This work will lay the foundation for a community-driven process and emphasize the need to further support infrastructure suited for changing climates. The post Guangqing Chi, Penn State University – Infrastructure in Rural Alaska appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Guangqing Chi, Penn State University – Infrastructure in Rural Alaska

Most Popular Segment – Beth Feingold, University at Albany – Food Waste

This is Best of Week on The Academic Minute: For the Most Popular Segment Award: Beth Feingold, associate professor in the school of public health at the University at Albany, explains why how a lot of food waste happens before it gets to the store. Beth J Feingold, PhD is an interdisciplinary environmental health scientist. Bridging geography, epidemiology and global health, her research addresses the dynamic relationship among the food system, environmental sustainability and population health. Dr. Feingold earned her PhD in Public Health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, her Master of Environmental Science from the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, her Master of Public Health from Yale School of Public Health and her Bachelor of Arts in Geology from Vassar College. She was the Glenadore and Howard L Pim Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Johns Hopkins University and a Postdoctoral Associate at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment and Global Health Institute. She joined the University at Albany as an Assistant Professor in 2014. Food Waste https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/12-31-21-Albany-Food-Waste.wav When you think about food waste, you might imagine leftovers rotting in your fridge or apple cores tossed in the trash... But over half of the 62.5 million pounds of food lost and wasted annually in the U.S. occurs before it even gets to your doorstep. And most of that "food waste" is actually "wasted food" – that is, items that were lost or wasted along the way for reasons having little to do with how good it looked or tasted. This wasted food means wasted resources like money and labor, but also water, land, energy and nutrients. It means accelerated climate change, and ultimately comes at a cost to public health. Around the country, advocates and policy makers are coupling efforts to address hunger, food security, and environmental sustainability by implementing food recovery programs that redistribute good food that might otherwise be wasted to hunger relief organizations like food banks and food pantries. However, little research has sought to quantify the environmental, nutritional and health impacts of these efforts. This is what my team, including key community partners, has set out to answer in New York's Capital Region. Focusing on fresh fruits and vegetables, which have high nutritional value and account for 40 percent of all wasted food, we're asking questions like, "Do interventions like donation-based tax incentives effectively reduce greenhouse gas emissions?"...do they increase the nutrition – and nutrition-related health impacts among food pantry clients?" and more recently – "how is the COVID-19 pandemic challenging both food recovery and redistribution efforts and food access?" While we recognize that systemic changes are needed to address the entrenched issues of waste and hunger, my team and I hope that our efforts to fill this important data gap will ultimately help lead to lasting solutions and contribute to a more equitable, sustainable U.S. food system The post Most Popular Segment – Beth Feingold, University at Albany – Food Waste appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Most Popular Segment – Beth Feingold, University at Albany – Food Waste

Best Heath Segment – Riana Anderson, University of Michigan – Stressors and the Black Community

This is Best of Week on The Academic Minute: For the Best Health Segment Choice Award: Riana Anderson, assistant professor in the school of public health at the University of Michigan, explores the stressors faced by black communities during the pandemic. Riana Elyse Anderson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of Michigan's School of Public Health. She earned her PhD in Clinical and Community Psychology at the University of Virginia and completed a Clinical and Community Psychology Doctoral Internship at Yale University's School of Medicine. She also completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in Applied Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania supported by the Ford and Robert Wood Johnson Foundations. She uses mixed methods in clinical interventions to study racial discrimination and socialization in Black families to reduce racial stress and trauma and improve psychological well-being and family functioning. She is particularly interested in how these factors predict familial functioning and subsequent child psychosocial well-being and health-related behaviors when enrolled in family-based interventions. Dr. Anderson is the developer and director of the EMBRace (Engaging, Managing, and Bonding through Race) intervention and loves to translate her work for a variety of audiences, particularly those whom she serves in the community, via blogs, video, and literary articles. Finally, Dr. Anderson was born in, raised for, and returned to Detroit and is becoming increasingly addicted to cake pops. Stressors and the Black Community https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/12-30-21-Michigan-Stressors-and-the-Black-Community.wav As Black communities confront the novel coronavirus, they are faced with stressors that impact them on a structural, interpersonal, and individual level. Medical racism—or the dismissal, denial, and degradation of those seeking health care—exacerbates transmission, treatment, and mortality issues, and directly impacts their physical health. This racism continues to chip away at the psychological wellness and wherewithal of Black people, just as other forms of racism do. The cumulative effect of one's personal health, worries about one's and others' health, and greater community loss and grief exacerbates the distress experienced by Black people. This global pandemic may also bring about heightened challenges with reduced in-person or online contact between Black youth and their extended support network, including teachers, mentors, and family members. Given that the utilization of, access to, and provision of quality mental health care services is lower in Black communities, this extended network is critical for Black children's emotional wellness. Additionally, the false narratives of Black citizens engaging in risk-laden health behaviors places undue stress and burden on youth seeking to understand facts about the virus. Families who are already talking to their children about other race-related issues now have to couch the disparate outcomes of this virus into "The Talk", adding yet more stress to what children already contend with. Finally, limited resources, like internet accessibility, devices, and physical space may preclude Black youth from staying as connected to their routines and loved ones, bringing more strain and distress to an already challenging journey. We must certainly pay attention to the physical health of the Black community during these dual pandemics, but we must also consider the interconnected mental health issues and how to provide resources to schools, families, faith spaces, and the broader community. Remember, Black Lives Matter, but the quality of Black life matters as well. The post Best Heath Segment – Riana Anderson, University of Michigan – Stressors and the Black Community appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Best Heath Segment – Riana Anderson, University of Michigan – Stressors and the Black Community

Best Psychology Segment – Art Markman, University of Texas – Coherence, Belief Change, and...

This is Best of Week on The Academic Minute: For the Best Psychology Segment Award: Art Markman, professor of psychology and marketing at the University of Texas at Austin, discusses changing minds. Art Markman is the Annabel Irion Worsham Centennial Professor of Psychology and Marketing and Vice Provost of Continuing and Professional Education and New Education Ventures at the University of Texas at Austin. He has written over 150 papers on topics including reasoning, decision making, and motivation. He brings insights from cognitive science to a broader audience through his blogs at Psychology Today and Fast Company and his radio show/podcast Two Guys on Your Head. Art is the author of several books including Smart Thinking, Smart Change, Brain Briefs, and Bring Your Brain to Work. Coherence, Belief Change, and Convincing Other People https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/12-29-21-Texas-Coherence-Belief-Change-and-Convincing-Other-People.wav The world changes rapidly, and yet people's beliefs often don't keep up. You might be puzzled, for example, why people's attitudes about key world issues like the COVID-19 pandemic stay fixed even as new variants of the virus and other evidence become available. Many psychological theories suggest people maintain their beliefs based on coherence. The attitudes people express reflect consistency across different experiences and knowledge sources. To this end, people give a lot of weight to information that is consistent with their current beliefs and they discount information that conflicts with those beliefs. The desire to maintain consistency helps explain why people tend to be skeptical of things that contradict their beliefs, but are less critical of information that comports with their prevailing attitudes. It also explains why people don't pay much attention to the negatives of options they want to select, even though they may recognize later that they should have considered them more carefully. Because of this tendency toward coherence, it can feel fruitless to argue with people about their beliefs. Providing them with reasons why they should change their mind is rarely satisfying in the moment. Instead, people appear to dig their heels in. There is value in having discussions with people you disagree with. Avoid pushing too hard—instead tell a story that weaves together the information that supports your attitudes. The more information you provide supporting an alternative viewpoint, the more weight you give to another coherent view of the world. As the weight of contradictory evidence grows, people may experience a sudden shift in which they now belief as fervently in the position they rejected as they recently believed in the view they now reject. It may not be satisfying for that belief change to happen out of sight, but it can be effective. The post Best Psychology Segment – Art Markman, University of Texas – Coherence, Belief Change, and Convincing Other People appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Best Psychology Segment – Art Markman, University of Texas – Coherence, Belief Change, and...

Best Social Justice Segment – Shima Baradaran Baughman, University of Utah – The Police Myth

This is Best of Week on The Academic Minute: For the Best Social Justice Segment Award: Shima Baradaran Baughman, professor of law at the SJ Quinney College of Law at the University of Utah, explores the police myth. Shima Baradaran Baughman is a national expert on bail, prosecutors, drugs, and race and violent crime. Baughman has worked with economists and political scientists to write articles involving advanced empirical modeling and randomized controlled trials, including the largest global field experiment in the world. Her work has been featured in the New York Times, on National Public Radio, the Economist, the Washington Post, Forbes and other media outlets and she has been invited to present her work at Stanford, Cornell, Michigan, Texas, NYU, UCLA and many other law schools and to groups of federal and state judges and attorneys across the country. Her articles have been published in many top journals including University of Pennsylvania Law Review, USC Law Review, Georgetown Law Journal, Texas Law Review, George Washington Law Review, Minnesota Law Review, Notre Dame Law Review, Boston University Law Review and the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies. Her book, The Bail Book: A Comprehensive Look at Bail in America's Criminal Justice System with Cambridge University Press has contributed greatly to the field of criminal law. Her textbook, Criminal Law: Case Studies and Controversies (5th Ed Aspen), coauthored with Paul Robinson and Michael Cahill uses a unique approach to teaching criminal law. She is coauthor on the most popular criminal law student study aid, Examples & Explanations in Criminal Law (7th edition) (with Richard G. Singer & John Q. LaFond). The Police Myth https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/12-28-21-Utah-The-Police-Myth.wav The movement for black lives has forced a societal reckoning about the relationship between police and disaffected communities, and has given traction to removing police funding nationwide. The literature has focused on critiquing the mistrust of police among communities of color due to abuse and marginalization with remedies include police training to encourage treating people with dignity. Policing literature fails to fully address a core cause of police mistrust for people of color and the poor. To address these symptoms of policing failure requires a consideration of the purpose and function of police. Indeed, the core problem is a misunderstanding of policing that I call, "the police myth." The police myth is the two-fold belief that a primary function of police is crime control and that police solve crimes with regularity. Reliance on the police myth may provide societal comfort, but has made it difficult to address basic policing failure. Without understanding what police actually do and their relationship with crime, it is impossible to reimagine policing. The police crime myth in large part contributes to the distrust between police and communities of color, creating a cycle where people refuse to report to police and police fail to solve crimes. American policing costs $115 billion per year. It is worth evaluating this number in terms of the public service received, as solving serious crimes only constitutes a tiny fraction of police function. My research demonstrates that police only solve serious felony crimes about 20% of the time. While the police defunding movement is gaining support, critics exclaim that they are highly impractical and that reducing the role of police would increase crime. But if police are neither allocating a large portion of their time to addressing crime, nor solving most major crimes, would defunding police actually increase crime? If this is the moment to consider police reform, a meaningful dismantling of the police myth could be part of the solution. The post Best Social Justice Segment – Shima Baradaran Baughman, University of Utah – The Police Myth appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Best Social Justice Segment – Shima Baradaran Baughman, University of Utah – The Police Myth

Commissioner's Choice Award – Carolyn Henne, Florida State University – Art and Science Co...

This is Best of Week on The Academic Minute: For the Commissioner's Choice Award: Carolyn Henne, professor in the department of art at Florida State University, discusses one instance of the benefits of mixing art and science. Carolyn Henne earned her BA in Fine Arts and Economics from the College of William and Mary in 1983. She worked as an Agricultural Economist until she left to study and work at Lacoste School of the Arts in France. Thereafter, she earned her MFA in Sculpture and Extended Media from Virginia Commonwealth University in 1990. She worked as a custom prop fabricator for film and television, taught adjunct for VCU arts in Richmond, Peru and Scotland while showing her work actively. She moved into academic administration in 2003 serving as Administrative Director then as Assistant Dean for VCUarts until 2010. She currently lives in Tallahassee, Florida and works at FSU where she was Chair and Associate Dean in the College of Fine Arts until 2017. She is now the Graduate Program Director. She is also the co-Director of a collaborative project, Comma. Carolyn has had solo shows on a sandbar in Beaufort (NC) and in galleries in Nashville, Staunton (VA), Richmond (VA), Doha (Qatar) and the Bronx (NY). Her work has been shown at Art Works (FL), the Kuntoffice Gallery (Germany), and NIH's National Library of Medicine. Her work has been reviewed in Sculpture, Art Papers, and Gulf Times (Doha, Qatar). Art and Science Collaboration with Oysters https://academicminute.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/12/12-27-21-Florida-State-Art-and-Science-Collaboration-with-Oysters.wav Sea Stars, my sculptural installation on a sandbar in Beaufort, NC, is a colorful and biodegradable set of sculptures that will transform into living oyster reefs and be viewable during low tide. The work is driven by the belief in the power of exchange between disciplines and the ability for artists' works to serve as vehicles for inspiration, change and action. This new direction in artistic research and production stems from my participation as the FSU representative at Bridging Chasms, a symposium involving eight scholars from across the ACC. Each participant presented on elements and crucial details of their discipline. Dr. Niels Lindquist, a marine ecologist at UNC's Institute of Marine Sciences (IMS), was also a participant. He and his Commercial Fisherman partner, David Cessna, at the Sandbar Oyster Company have developed a uniquely successful substrate for attracting wild native oyster larvae. It had not occurred to Lindquist before Bridging Chasms that his materials research could be employed to make sculpture. This fortunate encounter sparked our collaboration and affords me unique ways of making art capable of generating change and helping to heal the planet. I am using the opportunity to pivot to eco-conscious materials and proactively address environmental issues relative to food scarcity, climate change, water quality, and reduction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere all the while providing habitat to a wide range of marine life and helping to preserve shorelines. The post Commissioner's Choice Award – Carolyn Henne, Florida State University – Art and Science Collaboration with Oysters appeared first on The Academic Minute.

Commissioner's Choice Award – Carolyn Henne, Florida State University – Art and Science Co...