The Bay Every good story starts local. So that's where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what's happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.
The Bay

The Bay

From KQED

Every good story starts local. So that's where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what's happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.

Most Recent Episodes

KQED's Podcast #Rightnowish Tackles How Art Shapes the Bay

Bay Area artists have a tendency to embed politics and messages for society into their creative work. KQED's newest podcast Rightnowish highlights those artists — and how what they make is shapes (and has been shaped by) where we are. Author and KQED Arts writer Pendarvis Harshaw brings us into his conversations with artists, creatives and thinkers who teach us about Bay Area life and culture. Guest: Pendarvis Harshaw, KQED Arts writer and Host of Rightnowish Subscribe to Rightnowish on Apple Podcasts, NPR One or Spotify to get the episodes to your feed as soon as they drop.

In Paradise, Power Shutoffs and PG&E's Unreliability Feel Like the New Normal

PG&E shut off the lights to 800,000 customers in Northern California, including 141,000 in the Bay Area. The utility company says the goal is to reduce the risk of wildfires. These latest shutdowns come almost a year after the deadly Camp Fire in Paradise, which was caused by PG&E transmission lines. Some residents in Paradise say living with shutoffs is the new normal at a time when public trust in the utility is low. Guest: Michelle Wiley, reporter for KQED For more information about the power shutoffs read KQED's article: Why Is This Happening? Answers to Your Questions on the PG&E Shutdown

In Paradise, Power Shutoffs and PG&E's Unreliability Feel Like the New Normal

Should San Francisco Force People With Mental Illness Into Treatment?

San Francisco is moving forward with a conservatorship program that would force people experiencing chronic homelessness, substance abuse and severe mental illness to get treatment even if they don't want to. A new state law allows San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego counties to create these five-year pilot programs. It's seen as a way to help people on the street who are suffering crisis, while some advocates for homeless people say conservatorships take away a person's civil liberties when there are other ways to help them. Guest: Kate Wolffe, KQED reporter Subscribe to The Bay to hear more local, Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One, or via Alexa.

How Nancy Pelosi's Beginnings Prepared Her to Lead Democrats on Impeachment

Although Nancy Pelosi didn't run for elected office until she was 47, politics is in her blood. Born into a prominent Baltimore political family, Pelosi learned at a young age the chess-maneuvering of politics. That skill has served her well throughout her life — from raising five kids in San Francisco, to becoming the first female speaker of the house. And that skill is also what makes her the right person to lead the democrats in this moment as they work to impeach President Donald Trump. Guest: Marisa Lagos, correspondent for KQED's California Politics and Government Desk and co-host of the Political Breakdown podcast. Read Marisa's full story here. Subscribe to The Bay to hear more local, Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One, or via Alexa.

How Nancy Pelosi's Beginnings Prepared Her to Lead Democrats on Impeachment

What Boulders Say About San Francisco's Inability to Find a Solution to Homelessness

Residents with a place to live on Clinton Park, a street in San Francisco, pooled their money together to buy boulders for the neighborhood's sidewalks.* The residents have complained that people living in an encampment across the street were committing crimes and using drugs. So, the boulders were placed on the sidewalks to deter that. But others reject that argument saying rocks are not a solution to the city's housing and affordability crisis. Guest: Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez, Columnist for the San Francisco Examiner Subscribe to The Bay to hear more local, Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One, or via Alexa.

What Boulders Say About San Francisco's Inability to Find a Solution to Homelessness

Why Berkeley's Gourmet Ghetto Is a Problem (For Some)

In 2019, words matter. So it's not surprising that a North Berkeley business group has decided to stop using the name "Gourmet Ghetto" to brand the now-iconic neighborhood. The moniker, for decades, has been used to identify a short stretch along Shattuck Avenue and nearby streets that's home to several legendary food and drink establishments, including the original Peet's Coffee, the Cheese Board Collective and Chez Panisse, a restaurant co-founded in the early 1970s by chef Alice Waters and considered a pioneer of California cuisine. But, as detailed in a recent Berkeleyside article, a group of residents and business owners have successfully pushed to scrap the name, one they consider antiquated and culturally insensitive. The word ghetto has long been associated with segregating specific groups of people. Its roots can be traced back to at least the 16th century, when Italian Jews were forced to live in restricted areas of Venice. In its more contemporary American context, ghetto is used as a pejorative to describe African American culture. Nick Cho, who recently opened Wrecking Ball Coffee in the neighborhood, led the effort to scrap the name. "One of the first things he said to me was, 'As soon as I get settled in, I'm going to lobby the city to change the name Gourmet Ghetto," said Sarah Han, who wrote the Berkeleyside article. It's not just the word ghetto that some have a problem with. Han points out that Alice Waters, whose name carries a lot of weight in the community, has said she believes the word "gourmet" is elitist. "She felt like it was an exclusive term," said Han, who also interviewed Waters. "That people who are described as 'gourmet' are people who are of a certain socioeconomic background." Although there are competing theories as to how the neighborhood got its title, Han said it's most commonly attributed to a comedian named Darryl Henriques, who in the 1970s worked at the Cheese Board and performed in a local comedy troupe. He purportedly used the term "gourmet ghetto" in a skit poking fun at the neighborhood's emerging upscale food establishments. The effort to change the name follows others like it across the country and in the Bay Area, where community members have been challenging names of streets, schools, parks and other public places, often because they represent some aspect of the legacy of white supremacy in America. At a public meeting last Thursday, hosted by the North Shattuck Association — the neighborhood's business group — some residents were upset at the decision to remove the name from branding going forward, said Han. But, she added, a number of her readers have also commented that, until now, they had never really considered that some might find the name offensive. "I think it's about admitting that you said it, you know why it's wrong, and then not using it anymore" Han said.

When Should Vallejo Officers Be Required to Test for Drugs or Alcohol?

Vallejo residents attended a city council meeting this week wearing bright yellow stickers that read "Coked Cops Kill." They opposed efforts by the police union to delete a section of its contract that outlines when an officer could be ordered to receive drug and alcohol testing. Councilors approved the new contract, limiting when officers may be subject to drug and alcohol tests. Guest: Ericka Cruz Guevarra, producer for The Bay Read Ericka's full story on the meeting here. And below are links to her three episode series on Vallejo police. Episode 1: The Life and Death of Willie McCoy Episode 2: In Vallejo, a Sister Challenges the Police Narrative of Her Brother's Shooting Episode 3: How Did Things Get So Bad Between Vallejo and Its Police? Subscribe to The Bay to hear more local, Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One, or via Alexa.

Unplugged: PG&E Shuts Down Power In Several Northern California Cities

It's hot. It's dry. And your power might get shut off. PG&E has been making daily decisions this week on whether to shut off power to wildland areas in Northern California that are at risk of fire. The utility announced shutoffs in portions of Butte, Napa, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sonoma, and Yuba counties starting Wednesday. That's almost 50,000 customers. Some worry if you pull the plug, the sick and elderly could suffer without power. On the other hand, no one wants to see another deadly fire like the one that destroyed Paradise. So how does PG&E decide which places go dark? Guest: Lily Jamali, host of KQED's The California Report To get updates on PG&E power shut offs please tap here.

The Voice Behind 'I Got 5 On It'

Mike Marshall has a voice you've probably heard before. He was the vocal on the 90s anthem I've Got Five On It. More recently, Marshall covered San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair) in the movie The Last Black Man in San Francisco. Marshall waited decades to feel recognized for his voice. And it took two movies that take place around the Bay Area to make that happen. Guest: Chloe Veltman, arts and culture reporter for KQED Click here to read Chloe's full story. Subscribe to The Bay to hear more local, Bay Area stories like this one. New episodes are released Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 3 a.m. Find The Bay on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, Stitcher, NPR One, or via Alexa.

Ordered Out But Fighting for Her Life to Stay

Maria Isabel Bueso immigrated to the United States from Guatemala 16 years ago so she could receive treatment in the Bay Area for a rare genetic disease. Her family has been able to stay here legally under "medical deferred action," which offers humanitarian relief to people often seeking life-saving medical treatment in the U.S. But in August, Bueso and her family received a deportation order. After she and other advocates pushed back on the Trump administration policy, the immigration agency who sent her that letter reversed course. Guest: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED immigration reporter

Back To Top