The Bay Every good story starts local. So that's where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what's happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.
The Bay

The Bay

From KQED

Every good story starts local. So that's where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what's happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.

Most Recent Episodes

What Would it Mean to Make Housing a Human Right?

Housing is not a human right in the United States. But more people are saying it should be. That growing movement has roots here in the Bay Area, where it's been nearly a year since the mothers behind Moms 4 Housing first occupied a house on Magnolia Street in West Oakland. Earlier this month, the moms announced that the home would soon be used for transitional housing. In the latest episode of the KQED podcast Sold Out: Rethinking Housing in America, hosts Molly Solomon and Erin Baldassari dive deep into what it would actually mean to make housing a right.

Armenians Came to SF to Escape Genocide. Now, Fears of That History Are Resurfacing

Armenians Came to SF to Escape Genocide. Now, Fears of That History Are Resurfacing

Generations of Armenians and descendants of those who escaped the Armenian Genocide have found refuge in San Francisco. That's the epicenter of a robust church community center and where Armenian Americans can celebrate their culture, history and heritage. It's also where a recent spate of suspected hate crimes are raising fears about the current border conflict — and painful memories of violence. Guest: Nastia Voynovskaya, KQED Arts and Culture editor and reporter

Armenians Came to SF to Escape Genocide. Now, Fears of That History Are Resurfacing

What Mutual Aid Means — And Why It's Worth Protecting

Community fridges have been popping up all over the Bay since the pandemic began as a form of mutual aid, which has deep roots here. There's a long history of this kind of community care, especially around food insecurity. Private companies have also used similar language to describe some of their own efforts. But KQED food writer and columnist Ruth Gebreyesus writes that the values of mutual aid are distinct — and worth protecting. Guest: Ruth Gebreyesus, food reporter and columnist for KQED Arts and Culture

Is Prop 25 California's Best Chance to End Cash Bail?

Proposition 25 is the culmination of a long fight over the bail system in California. A win for the "Yes" vote would uphold a law that abolishes cash bail and replaces it with a system that uses "risk assessment" algorithms to help judges decide whether to keep people locked up before trial. A win for the "No" vote would stop these changes and keep cash bail in place. The bail industry is in the "No" camp, but so are some progressive groups who think this new system would also be unjust and want the state legislature to go back to the drawing board on bail reform. That's why the campaign around Prop 25 isn't just about the merits of cash bail — it's about whether or not this is the state's best chance to end it for good. Guest: Marisa Lagos, KQED politics correspondent and co-host of the Political Breakdown podcast Click here to check out KQED's California Voter Guide, which includes information on statewide propositions, local measures, and voting.

The Digital Divide for Latino Immigrant Families in Oakland

Distance learning is hard enough. And once you get past acquiring the technology needed to make it happen, there's an additional step for many immigrant families and Indigenous-language speakers: figuring out how to log on and communicate with your teachers. In Oakland Unified School District, where about half of students speak a language other than English at home, supporting all students has been a struggle. Guests: Madeleine Bair, founding director of El Tímpano and Ashley McBride, Education Equity reporter for The Oaklandside You can find the full story at The Oaklandside.

A Bay Curious Guide to Statewide Propositions

Bay Curious is exploring the 12 statewide ballot propositions with its Prop Fest series. Today, we're sharing their guides to Props 16 and 17, which make big decisions on affirmative action and voting while on parole respectively. For more on Bay Curious' Prop Fest, click here.

Immigrant Workers Make 'Wine Country' Possible. Now Many Have Evacuated.

Latino and immigrant workers keep the economy of "wine country" going. And while many in the Bay Area sheltered in place at the start of the pandemic, farmworkers in Napa and Sonoma counties continued working. Now, the Glass Fire is threatening their livelihoods. Many workers have evacuated, and likely won't get much support from the government to help stabilize their lives. Guest: Farida Jhabvala Romero, KQED immigration reporter These organizations offer cash assistance to undocumented immigrants in Sonoma, Napa and Lake counties: UndocuFund for Disaster Relief in Sonoma County UpValley Relief Fund (includes Napa and Lake counties) Down Valley Relief Fund (Napa County) Find a full list of organizations providing assistance in Northern California here via the California Immigrant Resilience Fund. Find COVID-19-related resources from the state of California for immigrants in Spanish, Vietnamese and other languages here.

Immigrant Workers Make 'Wine Country' Possible. Now Many Have Evacuated.

South Asian Activist Kala Bagai Was Once Driven Out of Berkeley. Now There's A Street Name...

Berkeley recently renamed a street after a South Asian activist Kala Bagai. But her story isn't the typical one you hear about people who get streets or monuments named after them. Nearly 100 years ago, Bagai and her family were driven out of town by racist neighbors who didn't want them to move in. She and her family eventually left the Bay Area, and a lot of her later activism was the kind of work that didn't make the headlines. But that's exactly why some people feel like she's the perfect person to represent the past and the present. Guest: Barnali Ghosh, curator and community historian with the South Asian Radical History Walking Tour Click here to read a Mar. 12, 2020 op-ed in Berkeleyside by Kala Bagai's granddaughter, Rani Bagai, about her grandmother's story.

South Asian Activist Kala Bagai Was Once Driven Out of Berkeley. Now There's A Street Name...

The North Bay Journalist Providing Vital Fire Information for Her Neighbors

North Bay journalist Sarah Stierch has become a resource for locals looking for critical fire information, down to their specific block. That's because when the North Bay was burning in 2017, she knew the streets and roads and homes intimately enough to gain the trust of her neighbors seeking information. But aside from the latest fire reports, she's also been a compassionate voice for many people during these traumatic times. Guest: Sarah Stierch, writer and freelance journalist in Sonoma Consider supporting Sarah's work by donating to her Venmo or PayPal accounts.

The North Bay Journalist Providing Vital Fire Information for Her Neighbors

The Final Push to Count Everyone in the Bay

There are still Californians who need to be counted for the 2020 Census. Here in the Bay Area, there's the extra challenge of making sure we count people who don't have housing and families whose homes have been affected by wildfires. And this matters a lot, because who gets counted will help determine Congressional representation, federal funding, and how we define Bay Area identity for the next 10 years. Guest: Tyche Hendricks, KQED editor and reporter covering immigration and the 2020 Census

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