The Bay Every good story starts local. So that's where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what's happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.
The Bay

The Bay

From KQED

Every good story starts local. So that's where we start. The Bay is storytelling for daily news. KQED host Devin Katayama talks with reporters to help us make sense of what's happening in the Bay Area. One story. One conversation. One idea.

Most Recent Episodes

Corporate Influence on the Bay Area's Music Scene

The Bay Area's eccentric reputation is built from its arts and culture. Music is a centerpiece. So it's no wonder some in the music scene worry about the impact of large national promoters on independent venues that were once booked by local promoters. Guests: Sam Lefebvre, KQED Arts staff writer and Tony Bedard, local music promoter. Read Sam's story here.

What Bay Area Students Think About the #CollegeAdmissionScandal

Many people were not surprised that 13 of the 50 people charged in the college admission scandal this week are from the Bay Area. Among those not surprised that money and power impact who gets into colleges and who doesn't are three high school seniors at June Jordan School for Equity. Today, we hear from them and then get some advice on how to approach college selection. Guests: Meili Tan Rubio, Jasmine Menjivar, and Georgia Pori, seniors at June Jordan School for Equity and Dr. Barbara Austin with College Quest

Berkeley's 'Welcome' Signs Acknowledge Ohlone Land and the Bay Area's Original People

Berkeley unveiled new city limit signs this week that say "Welcome to the City of Berkeley – Ohlone Territory." Colonizers have wiped away much Native American history in the Bay Area, but a few burial shellmounds are still around. Another sign that reminds us of who was here first and whose land we are living on. In this episode, originally produced by KQED's Bay Curious show, we review a part of the Ohlone shellmound history in the East Bay. Guest: Laura Klivans, KQED reporter Read more about Ohlone shellmounds from KQED's Bay Curious show.

Berkeley's 'Welcome' Signs Acknowledge Ohlone Land and the Bay Area's Original People

NIMBY. YIMBY. Now PHIMBY? The Housing Debate's Newest Slogan

Fights over housing policies in the Bay Area often include these two sides: The NIMBYs (not in my backyard) and the YIMBYs (yes in my backyard). Let me introduce you to the PHIMBYs, who are bringing another level of nuance to the housing debate. They believe more public housing should be part of a solution to the Bay Area's housing crisis. And they see a contentious project in the Mission as having PHIMBY potential. Guest: Jessica Placzek, KQED reporter For more, read Jessica's full story on PHIMBY and public housing in San Francisco at KQED.org.

No Charges For Officers Who Shot Stephon Clark. Will There Ever Be?

People are outraged that two Sacramento police officers will not face criminal charges for killing 22-year old Stephon Clark last year, an unarmed Black man holding a cell phone. The state attorney general and the district attorney both say the officers' use of deadly force was legally justified. But two bills in the Legislature could change the standards when deciding whether to prosecute officers, and how police train to use deadly force. Guest: Marisa Lagos, political correspondent for KQED

It's The Bay's One-Year Anniversary!

The Bay officially launched on March 6, 2018. Since then, we've covered some of the biggest Bay Area stories: elections, ICE raids and all kinds of housing laws. Plus, we've had some real conversations about Bay Area culture. But one of our favorite things is listening to messages that listeners have sent us about our episodes. So today we thought we'd revisit some of our favorite calls. Let us know about an episode of The Bay that moved you! Call 415-553-2273 and leave us a message. Tell us why that particular episode spoke to you. Also, thanks for listening!

Oakland Teachers Strike Ends, But Not Everyone Is Happy

The Oakland teachers strike is over. Teachers and other educators approved an agreement Sunday night to end the seven-day strike and give parents a reason to send their kids back to school. The agreement offers teachers a pay increase. But school board officials say the raises will come with future budget cuts in other departments. Plus, not everyone is happy with the new contract, especially nurses. Guests: Vanessa Rancano, education reporter for KQED and Julia McEvoy, education editor for KQED.

In the Bay Area, Deadly Heat Waves Are For Real

It's cold in the Bay Area now. But in 2017, two heat waves killed 14 people in the Bay Area. KQED reporting has found that most of those people who died started getting sick from the heat while inside some place, instead of outside in the sun. State regulators are now in the process of coming up with rules to regulate how hot workplaces can be in order to protect people from heat-related illnesses and deaths. Guest: Molly Peterson, reporter for KQED Science

Three Taser-Related Deaths and San Mateo Activists Demand Changes

Chinedu Okobi died last October after being tased by San Mateo sheriff deputies. His death was one of three that happened last year involving tasers and police officers from different departments. Activists and the family of those killed in taser-involved arrests have demanded information about how law enforcement uses tasers and want to see changes to how they are used. Meanwhile, the San Mateo County district attorney's office is expected to release details of its investigation into Okobi's death, which determine whether officers were legally justified to use force. Guest: Julie Small, KQED criminal justice reporter

'Unwavering Belief in Justice': San Francisco's Public Defender Jeff Adachi Dies

Jeff Adachi died suddenly Friday night. While details of how he died are still under investigation, many are remembering Adachi and his tireless efforts as a public defender who provided fair legal representation to the people who needed it most. Adachi was the only elected public defender in the state of California, making his position fighting for and against the system unique. Guest: Scott Shafer, Senior Editor of KQED's Politics and Government Desk. Subscribe and listen to the full Political Breakdown podcast here.

'Unwavering Belief in Justice': San Francisco's Public Defender Jeff Adachi Dies

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