Where We Live Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.
Where We Live

Where We Live

From Connecticut Public Radio

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Most Recent Episodes

Governor Ned Lamont discusses first term, short session, reelection campaign, and more

Campaign season is underway in Connecticut. This hour, we speak with incumbent Governor Ned Lamont about his first term and his reelection campaign. The recently-signed state budget delivers $660 million in tax cuts, but The Mirror's Keith Phaneuf reports "about $364 million or 55% of the tax relief offered in the latest budget expires after this fiscal year." We'll discuss the budget, bills still to be signed from the recent short session, including the "captive audience" bill, and more. Plus, we take your questions for Governor Lamont. GUESTS: Ned Lamont: Democratic Governor of Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Governor Ned Lamont discusses first term, short session, reelection campaign, and more

Author Sy Montgomery on her new book: "The Hawk's Way"

Sy Montgomery has authored over 30 books about animals. Today, she joins us to talk about her latest book, The Hawk's Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty. We learn about Sy's lessons in falconry and what it takes to handle these incredible creatures. Later, we hear from A Place Called Hope Rehabilitation Center, a raptor rehabilitator located in Killingworth. If you're a lover of birds of prey, we want to hear from you. What questions do you have about falconry? GUESTS: Sy Montgomery - Author of The Hawk's Way: Encounters with Fierce Beauty Christine Cummings - Executive Director and Founder of A Place Called Hope Rehabilitation Center in Killingworth, Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How contaminants like PFAS and microplastics are being tracked in Connecticut

Microbeads were banned in the U.S. in 2015, but tiny bits of plastic known as microplastics, and another manmade family of chemicals called PFAS, are turning up in our environment and in our bodies. The Connecticut Sea Grant identified both materials as contaminants of emerging concern this year. This hour, we hear about the efforts to track the prevalence and impact of PFAS and microplastics in Connecticut. Experts at Connecticut Sea Grant and the State Department of Public Health join us to discuss PFAS; and UConn Professor and Head of UConn's Marine Sciences Department J. Evan Ward touches on microplastics in the Long Island Sound. Plus, Elizabeth Ellenwood is an artist from Pawcatuck whose work draws attention to ocean pollution and microplastics. She was recently awarded a Fulbright Research Scholarship and an American Scandinavian Foundation Grant to travel to Norway, where she's working with environmental chemists and marine biologists to produce scientifically-informed photographs focusing on ocean pollution. GUESTS: J. Evan Ward: Professor and Head of Marine Sciences Department, UConn Sylvain De Guise: Director, Connecticut Sea Grant at UConn Avery Point Lori Mathieu: Drinking Water Section Chief, Connecticut Department of Public Health Elizabeth Ellenwood: Artist Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How contaminants like PFAS and microplastics are being tracked in Connecticut

Hospital prices vary widely for same procedures statewide – what's a patient to do?

A new report on hospital costs by Hearst Connecticut shows widely different prices for the same procedure at hospitals statewide. And insurers are negotiating astoundingly varied prices for – say – a C-section or an hour of critical care. To a consumer, the hospitals would appear comparable in quality and are located just miles apart. Certainly, shopping for healthcare is different from shopping for a toaster. The price is dependent on the type of insurance plan, and the billing codes are mind boggling. Yet, in a well-functioning, competitive market, such extreme variations in comparable services would not exist – according to a Brookings report in 2020. This hour on Where We Live, Mary Katherine Wildeman, author of the Hearst Connecticut special report, dives into patterns in the data. And the data is still hard to find – there isn't a central searchable database where consumers can compare prices for a pre-scheduled procedure at hospitals statewide. Also this hour on Where We Live, Vicky Veltri from the Office of Health Strategy announces a new tool that will soon become available to patients in Connecticut. So what exactly will hospital price transparency – now required by law – accomplish? And, insurers will also have to share price information, starting July 1. Could employers begin directing their employees to make certain healthcare choices versus others? Beyond transparency, we look at a bill that was just passed by Connecticut lawmakers that will give the state the authority to cap the rise in healthcare costs. The bill will also hold providers and insurers accountable. GUESTS: Mary Katherine Wildeman: Data Reporter, Hearst Connecticut. Authored the Hearst Connecticut Special Report: "Hospital care costs are wildly different across CT. Explore the once secret data." Vicki Veltri: Executive Director, Office of Health Strategy, State of Connecticut Paul Kidwell: Senior Vice President of Policy, Connecticut Hospital Association Nick McLaughlin: Founder & CEO, Breeze Health, a Goodroot Inc. affiliated company Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Hospital prices vary widely for same procedures statewide – what's a patient to do?

Election season begins, and an update on cannabis in our state

The Republican and Democratic state conventions have concluded and today, Mark Pazniokas joins us to break down the state conventions. The Republican convention endorsed socially moderate Themis Klarides for the U.S. Senate. Democrats have endorsed a diverse pool of candidates for several state positions. Later, we hear from Andrea Comer of the Social Equity Council and get an update on cannabis in our state. Election season is fast approaching. Who do you want to see on the ballot in 2022? GUESTS: Mark Pazniokas - Capitol Bureau Chief for Connecticut Mirror Andrea Comer - Deputy Commissioner at the Department of Consumer Protection, and Chairperson of Social Equity Council Julia Bergman - State Politics Reporter at Hearst Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond Central Park: The legacy of Connecticut native Frederick Law Olmsted

When you head to New York, do you ever take a break from the city and get lost on a trail in Central Park? This hour, we take a look at the life of the man behind that beloved and iconic city park: Connecticut native Frederick Law Olmsted. Although best known for his work designing New York's Central Park, Olmsted was also a journalist and abolitionist. And he shaped landscapes here in Connecticut and across the country, changing how we think about the role of nature in the process. This hour we sit down with historians and landscape architects to talk about Frederick Law Olmsted's legacy. GUESTS: Justin Martin: Author, Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted Walt Woodward: Connecticut State Historian; Associate Professor of History, UConn; Host, Grating The Nutmeg podcast Phil Barlow: Founding Principal, ToDesign LLC Landscape Architects Beka Sturges - Principal Landscape Architect, New Haven Office of Reed Hilderbrand Chion Wolf contributed to this show, which originally aired on September 9, 2019. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Beyond Central Park: The legacy of Connecticut native Frederick Law Olmsted

It's all connected: Understanding how our physical and mental health are linked

If you experience headaches, fatigue or gastrointestinal issues during difficult times, you're not alone. Today, we explore the link between our physical and mental health. Doctors typically treat these areas of health separately, but there is a lot more connecting these two areas of health than you might think. Dr. Julian Ford, clinical psychologist and professor in the department of psychiatry at the UConn School of Medicine joins us to talk about the physical consequences of chronic stress. We want to hear from you. How has stress impacted your overall health? GUESTS: Dr. Julian Ford - Clinical psychologist and Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine Aneri Pattani - National Correspondent with Kaiser Health News Heather Labbe - Director of Trauma Informed Wellness and Education at the YWCA in New Britain, Connecticut Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

It's all connected: Understanding how our physical and mental health are linked

Warmer winters make for more ticks. What are the challenges in diagnosing diseases they can carry?

Warmer winters in Connecticut are helping to welcome invasive ticks, and the diseases they can carry. Nearly half of the ticks in Connecticut are carrying one pathogen, according to Dr. Goudarz Molaei, head of the state's tick surveillance program; and at least three invasive tick species are being tracked. Mary Beth Pfeiffer joins to touch more on the link between climate change and the spread of ticks. Plus, diagnosing tick-borne diseases is tough enough, but Chronic author Dr. Steven Phillips points out some medical myths and misnomers making it harder. What can help us better prevent, and treat, vector-borne illnesses? GUESTS: Dr. Steven Phillips: Physician; Author, Chronic: The Hidden Cause of the Autoimmune Pandemic and How to Get Healthy Again Mary Beth Pfeiffer: Investigative Journalist; Author, Lyme: The First Epidemic of Climate Change Dr. Goudarz Molaei: Research Scientist, Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Center; Director of the Tick and Tick-borne Diseases Surveillance Program, Center for Vector Biology and Zoonotic Diseases Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Warmer winters make for more ticks. What are the challenges in diagnosing diseases they can carry?

Despite Connecticut's first-of-its-kind "safe haven" for abortion legislation, barriers to...

Connecticut lawmakers passed legislation strengthening reproductive rights, making the state a "place of refuge" for people seeking abortions. This hour on Where We Live, we talk about this measure – which has become more important in light of the leaked Supreme Court documents — indicating a decision to overturn Roe. V. Wade. The Guttmacher Institute reports that nine states have enacted a total of 33 abortion restrictions as of April 15. More states are writing restrictions into law. States have enacted 11 measures protecting abortion access in seven states. Guttmacher reports that 2020 was the first year that more than half of U.S. abortions were medication abortions. According to data obtained by Where We Live, there were 9,373 abortion visits at Planned Parenthood of Southern New England's (PPSNE) 14 health centers in Connecticut in 2021 – of which 6,282 were Medication Abortions (MAB), and 3,091 were in-clinic abortions. PPSNE is the largest provider of abortion care in Connecticut, while Hartford GYN is the state's only independent clinic for abortion. Connecticut's "safe haven" legislation is first-of-its-kind in the nation. Produced by Sujata Srinivasan. Special thanks to Matt Dwyer and Camila Vallejo for extra audio. GUESTS: Rep. Matt Blumenthal (D-Stamford, Darien): House Vice-Chair of the Judiciary Committee Julia Simon–Kerr: Professor of Law, University of Connecticut School of Law Dr. Kate Pascucci: OBGYN, West Hartford Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Despite Connecticut's first-of-its-kind "safe haven" for abortion legislation, barriers to...

What will an Elon Musk-run Twitter look like?

The journey to comprehensive content moderation on Twitter has been a long one, but the tech giant might be changing course. Today, we're talking about what Twitter might look like under Elon Musk and if free speech and content moderation can coexist together. Georgia Wells, Tech Reporter from Wall Street Journal, breaks down what we're seeing and hearing from Elon Musk. Later, we hear from Evan Greer, Director for Fight for the Future, to talk about balancing free speech while making the internet safe for everyone. Are you still using Twitter? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Georgia Wells - Tech Reporter, Wall Street Journal Evan Greer - Director at Fight for the Future, a nonprofit digital rights organization that organizes online to oppose Internet censorship legislation, support net neutrality, and rein in corporate and government surveillance. Joan Donovan - Research Director for the Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy at Harvard University Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.