Where We Live Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.
Where We Live

Where We Live

From Connecticut Public

Where We Live is a call-in talk show about who we are in Connecticut and our place in the world.

Most Recent Episodes

Work In Progress: Going Back To Work During The Pandemic

Connecticut's unemployment rate has hovered above 8 percent, more than double the rate pre- pandemic. But now that the job market is picking up, why are business owners having such a hard time hiring? This hour, we talk about what employers are doing to get people back to work. We hear from a local landscaper who is navigating hiring during the pandemic. What will the job market look like after the pandemic? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Eric Nelson - Owner of Garden Paths, Inc. Patrick Flaherty - Director of Research, Connecticut Department of Labor Gary Burtless - Senior Fellow, Economic Studies at The Brookings Institution Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pay Transparency: One Way To Reduce Wage Gap For Women And People Of Color

Women, on average, make 82 cents for every dollar earned by men. And women of color make even less than that. This hour, we take a look at the role greater pay transparency can play to address the wage gap in our country. Advocates in Connecticut say that listing starting salaries publicly for open positions is a step towards evening the playing field. We want to hear from you, too. Do you have salary transparency at your workplace? GUESTS: Maya Raghu - Director of Workplace Equality and Senior Counsel at the National Women's Law Center (NWLC) Madeline Granato - Policy Director at the Connecticut Women's Education and Legal Fund (CWEALF) Tyler Falk - Reporter covering public radio for Current, an independent trade publication that covers public media Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Pay Transparency: One Way To Reduce Wage Gap For Women And People Of Color

Comptroller's Public Option Health Insurance Plan Encounters Resistance

This hour, we speak with Connecticut Comptroller Kevin Lembo on his public option proposal to give more people the chance to join a health insurance program overseen by the state. The Connecticut Partnership Plan is already offered to municipal workers and school employees. But how would he pay for it? And how would he avoid frightening away insurance companies that are big employers in the state? Guests: Connecticut Comptroller Kevin Lembo Kaiser Health News Senior Correspondent Mary Agnes Carey We want to hear from you. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Financial Literacy For Kids, And Beyond!

Ever wonder why you were required to learn algebra, but not how to balance a checkbook and file your taxes? Although personal finance and accounting are offered as an elective in many high schools, they're not often required for graduation. This hour, we talk to Nan Morrison - President and CEO, Council for Economic Education about teaching our children to be more financially literate. The secret is starting them young! Do you wish you had the chance to learn subjects like investing, credit, and even just basic budgeting? We want to hear from you. GUESTS: Nan Morrison - President and CEO, Council for Economic Education Lew DeLuca - Coordinator, Student Financial Literacy & Advising at Southern Connecticut State University Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

As School Year Wraps Up, Connecticut Gets Ready For Summer

Another school year in a pandemic is winding down. That means parents have been thinking about summer plans like summer camps. The Lamont administration has said it will invest COVID-19 relief money to make summer camp experiences accessible to all Connecticut students. This hour, we talk with a camp director and hear from state agencies that serve kids. What's in store for summer 2021? GUESTS: Kath Davies - Director of Camp Hazen YMCA, a summer camp in Chester, Connecticut Beth Bye - Commissioner of the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood Chris Soto - Director of Innovation and Partnerships at the Connecticut State Department of Education Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Our Pandemic Pastimes Are Here To Stay

With no commute to work and no gathering with friends, how have you been spending time during this pandemic? This hour, we talk about pandemic hobbies and the lifelong benefits of having a hobby. Whether you are baking sourdough bread, or learning a new language - we want to hear from you! What's your pandemic hobby? Don't feel like you have time to pick up a new hobby? It takes less effort than you think. GUESTS: Tara Parker-Pope - Founding Editor for "Well", The New York Times Consumer Health Section Brigid Schulte - author of Overwhelmed: Work, Love and Play When No One Has the Time and director of the Better Life Lab at New America. She is also a long time journalist and former Washington Post staff writer Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

State Regulator Says Eversource Failed In Its Response to August Outages

How many days were you out of power last summer after Tropical Storm Isaias? The outages last August impacted hundreds of thousands of residents. Some lasted more than a week. This hour, we talk with Marissa Gillett, Chairman of PURA, Connecticut's utility regulator. The agency investigated how the state's two major electric companies dealt with the storm and issued a final decision. What will it mean for consumers? GUESTS: Patrick Skahill - Reporter for Connecticut Public Radio, covering science and the environment Marissa Gillett - Chairman of Connecticut's Public Utilities Regulatory Authority (PURA) Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

State Regulator Says Eversource Failed In Its Response to August Outages

Lamont, Fellow General Assembly Democrats Present Rival Budget Plans

This hour, it affects virtually everyone in the state of Connecticut in one way or another, but it can be difficult to understand. The state budget decides how much we pay in taxes, and it helps determine the level of resources for important services like education, care for elderly people, and public health. We dive into the politics and process of funding state government. What do you care about? Sean Scanlon — Democratic State Representative from Branford and Guilford and Co-chair of the General Assembly Finance Committee Catherine Osten — Democratic State Senator and Co-chair of the General Assembly Appropriations Committee Keith Phaneuf — CT Mirror budget reporter We want to hear from you. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Insects Around The World Are Disappearing. What Can We Do About It?

Insects are the most abundant group of animals on the planet. There are an estimated 10 quintillion of them on Earth. But in recent years, scientists have found disturbing evidence that insect populations are on the decline around the world. The environmental threats to insects are numerous: deforestation, pesticides, and climate change all seem to play a part in declining populations, a phenomenon UConn ecologist David Wagner and colleagues described as a "death by a thousand cuts" in a January 2021 special issue of PNAS dedicated to the issue of insect decline. This hour, we talk with the scientists and journalists trying to make sense of the precipitous decline in insect populations around the world. We hear from a Nevada researcher whose recent study in the journal Science helps pinpoint the role of climate change in disappearing butterfly populations across the American West. And we ask: what does loss could mean for us, and what can we do about it? GUESTS: Elizabeth Kolbert - Staff writer at the New Yorker and Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Sixth Extinction. She wrote a cover story for National Geographic's May 2020 issue about worldwide insect decline. Her new book is Under a White Sky: The Nature of the Future Dr. David Wagner - Entomologist and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at UConn Dr. Matthew Forister - Insect ecologist at the University of Nevada, Reno Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Rebecca F. Kuang Ends THE POPPY WAR Fantasy Trilogy With A Blaze

Rebecca F. Kuang started writing her first novel, The Poppy War, when she was just 19 years old. The final installment in the author's dark military fantasy series, The Burning God, came out last November. Now, The Poppy War trilogy has been nominated for the 2021 Hugo Award for best series. This hour we talk with Kuang, who will also be starting a PhD program at Yale University in East Asian Languages and Literature. She has pursued an extensive academic career in modern Chinese studies—while also writing acclaimed fantasy novels. Kuang's stories weave the fantastic with her deep knowledge of twentieth century Chinese history. Have you been reading The Poppy War trilogy? Cat Pastor contributed to this show which originally aired November 17, 2020. Support the show: http://wnpr.org/donate See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

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