Weekend Sky Report WFYI's Matt Pelsor is an astronomy geek. He loves observing the stars, planets and other celestial objects that fill our night sky. With Matt's help, you'll never miss another streaking comet, partial eclipse or harvest moon.
Weekend Sky Report

Weekend Sky Report

From WFYI Public Radio

WFYI's Matt Pelsor is an astronomy geek. He loves observing the stars, planets and other celestial objects that fill our night sky. With Matt's help, you'll never miss another streaking comet, partial eclipse or harvest moon.

Most Recent Episodes

Moon, Jupiter and Saturn

The weather doesn't look great this weekend, but if we're lucky enough to have clear or clear-ish skies, look the southeast after sundown... so around 9:30.

Moon, Comet NEOWISE, Jupiter and Saturn

There's a lot in the sky this weekend for anyone with binoculars or a cheap telescope. Comet Neowise is still in the northwestern sky, but turn around and you'll see two slightly more permanent fixtures.

Comet NEOWISE

If you have dark skies, you can see Comet Neowise with the naked eye, but urban and most suburban observers will probably need some help spotting it.

Jupiter

Jupiter

The largest planet in our solar system is clearly visible late at night. It rises to the southeast just after sunset, and it's highest right around 2am, so if you're up late, go out and look.

Lunar Geography

Looking at the moon with the naked eye, you'll notice a few big features. The so-called "seas," the large 'Ocean of Storms' to the west, Even the Tycho crater to the south. But look closer with a telescope-even a pair of binoculars, and the moon REALLY reveals itself.

Jupiter and Saturn

Jupiter and Saturn will be low to the southeast late evening. The later it is, the higher they'll be. They're right next to each other too, so if you find one, you can find the other.

Summer Triangle

Summer Triangle

The stars Vega, Deneb, and Altair form what's called the summer triangle, which sweeps overhead all night during the warmer months of the northern hemisphere.

Messier 10 and Messier 12

Ophiuchus was one of the original 48 constellations listed by the second century Greek astronomer Ptolemy.

Strawberry Moon

It's called the Strawberry Moon because June is the month when strawberries are ripe for the picking in much of the US.

M13 (Hercules)

The Great Globular Cluster in Hercules, or M13 was discovered by astronomer Edmund Halley in 1714, and found its way into Charles Messier's catalog of comet-like objects fifty years later.

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