In Conversation There's a lot going on in Louisville, and WFPL's In Conversation with Rick Howlett gives people a platform to talk — both to each other, and with the larger community — about the biggest issues facing our city, state and region. Live at 11 a.m. every Friday on 89.3 WFPL. Miss the show? Listen here as a weekly podcast.
In Conversation

In Conversation

From 89.3 WFPL News Louisville

There's a lot going on in Louisville, and WFPL's In Conversation with Rick Howlett gives people a platform to talk — both to each other, and with the larger community — about the biggest issues facing our city, state and region. Live at 11 a.m. every Friday on 89.3 WFPL. Miss the show? Listen here as a weekly podcast.

Most Recent Episodes

Transportation Has Changed; Louisville Plans to Change With It

Whether it's the new toll bridges, potholes and construction along Dixie Highway or new electronic fare cards at TARC, transportation — or the lack thereof — plays a big role in many people's lives in Louisville. In highway projects alone, Jefferson County spent $113 million in 2018, according to data from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet. But when it comes to public transportation, people relying on the bus system still face challenges getting to where they need to go. Plus, a change to the Transit Authority of River City's new fare system has caused delays and other disruptions for some riders. And major construction to improve Dixie Highway, which officials in 2017 said had a fatality rate three times that of similar state roadways, is set to finish this December. We talked about transportation and what's next for the city. Joining us were: Ferdinand Risco Jr. — Interim Executive Director of the Transit Authority of River City Cathy Hinko — Executive Director of the Metropolitan Housing Coalition Jeff O'Brien — Director of Develop Louisville

Twenty Years After Fairness Ordinance, LGBTQ Leaders Say There's Still Work To Do

It's been 20 years since Louisville became the first Kentucky city to pass an ordinance making it illegal to discriminate in housing, employment and public accommodations based on sexual orientation and gender identity. We discussed the ordinance and how it has — and has not — changed things. We also review similar measures approved by 10 other cities across the state, and how these local initiatives coexist with new state laws allowing religious expression. Our guests were: - Lisa Gunterman — Fairness Ordinance Organizer - Chris Hartman — Director, Fairness Campaign - Alicia Pedreira — Fairness Ordinance Organizer - Dawn Wilson — Transgender Civil Rights Activist and member of the Louisville Metro Human Relations Commission

Twenty Years After Fairness Ordinance, LGBTQ Leaders Say There's Still Work To Do

Will Louisville Get An NBA Team? Should We Want One?

Soccer is big in Louisville. College basketball is huge. So why don't we have a major league team here? That's what we talked about this week on In Conversation, with these guests: Dan Issel, president of NBA2LOU, the business group trying to land an NBA team Kent Oyler, president of Greater Louisville Inc., the Louisville-area chamber of commerce Dr. Patrick Rishe, Founding Director of the Sports Business Program at Washington University in St. Louis The NBA's official position is that expansion isn't on the table. But Dan Issel, president of NBA 2 Louisville, has some doubts. "In talking to some current and former administrators in the NBA front office, their feeling is that expansion is inevitable," Issel said. "Because the owners are always looking for ways to make more money." He said revenue from things like ticket sales and TV contracts has to be split 50/50 between owners and players' associations. But expansion fees go directly into the owners' pockets. "So the feeling is, it's inevitable," Issel said. "Do we know the timeline? No." Kent Oyler from GLI says having an NBA team could attract talent to the city, and increase Louisville's national visibility. "We that live here know our city. We love our city. It's a great place, lots to do, lots of cultural attractions," he said. "But if you get out of the city, and you're trying to talk to somebody that's in Chicago, or Austin, or Denver, they've heard of Louisville, but they really don't know Louisville. We're just not on the radar screen out of town." He said it's important to attract new folks because Louisville's population numbers are flat, and there are around 27,000 open jobs. "And if we want to get more people moving here, they have to start thinking of us." In Conversation airs live on 89.3 WFPL, Friday mornings at 11. You can call the show during that hour at 502-814-TALK (8255).

Wayne Lewis Charts JCPS Plan, Defends Charter Schools on 'In Conversation'

A state corrective action plan with Jefferson County Public Schools has gone into effect. The plan follows a scathing audit of JCPS — including concerns about security and culture — and helped the district to avoid a state takeover. That takeover was recommended by Dr. Wayne Lewis almost immediately after he was appointed Kentucky Education Commissioner. The move drew condemnation from civil rights groups and JCPS and the state later negotiated an agreement that averted a takeover. Join us as we talk about funding for charter schools, the state intervention at JCPS, new state education standards and education-related legislation. This week's guest was: Dr. Wayne Lewis, Kentucky Department of Education Commissioner

Wayne Lewis Charts JCPS Plan, Defends Charter Schools on 'In Conversation'

What's Ahead For Kentucky Bourbon?

Kentucky's bourbon boom is showing no sign of fading, with both new and longtime distillers investing hundreds of millions of dollars in expansions and new projects. But the bourbon explosion comes with worries. Producers say escalating trade tensions could hurt the industry. This week, WFPL's In Conversation with Rick Howlett checked the pulse of the industry with an hour-long talk with bourbon insiders — and with you. This week's guests were: Susan Reigler, Bourbon writer Marianne Eaves, Master Distiller at Castle and Key Distillery Eric Gregory, Kentucky Distillers' Association President

Announcing WFPL's New Weekly Talk Show: In Conversation

We'll take calls from listeners and comments from social media, giving the community a platform to have their questions answered and hold elected officials accountable. The show will give people a space to talk — both to each other, and with the larger community. We also want your input on show topics. What are the important issues that aren't being publicly discussed? Who do you want to hear from? What's happening in your neighborhood? Send us your ideas through the form below, and we'll let you know if we produce a show on the topic.

Back To Top