In Conversation There's a lot going on in Louisville, and WFPL's In Conversation with Rick Howlett gives people a platform to talk — both to each other, and with the larger community — about the biggest issues facing our city, state and region. Live at 11 a.m. every Friday on 89.3 WFPL. Miss the show? Listen here as a weekly podcast.
In Conversation

In Conversation

From 89.3 WFPL News Louisville

There's a lot going on in Louisville, and WFPL's In Conversation with Rick Howlett gives people a platform to talk — both to each other, and with the larger community — about the biggest issues facing our city, state and region. Live at 11 a.m. every Friday on 89.3 WFPL. Miss the show? Listen here as a weekly podcast.

Most Recent Episodes

Experts Have a Warning For Kentucky's Youth About Vaping Dangers

Kentucky and the rest of the nation are wrestling with the huge popularity of electronic cigarettes among youth. A survey by the Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky found the number of youth who use e-cigarettes, an activity referred to as vaping, doubled from 2016 through 2018 for sixth, eighth, 10th and 12th graders. Research has found many non-smoking youth who use e-cigarettes are more likely to later turn to traditional cigarettes when compared to teens who didn't vape. Jefferson County Public Schools launched an awareness campaign on the issue, and U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell recently introduced a bill to raise the national minimum age for buying tobacco products from 18 to 21. WFPL's Rick Howlett talked to Foundation for a Healthy Kentucky President Ben Chandler and Dr. Daniel Conklin of the University of Louisville School of Medicine about the topic and how vaping affects Kentucky's youth.

What's The Role Of The Community In Combating Louisville's Toxic Air Pollution?

In April, WFPL published a five-part series about toxic air pollution in Louisville. Energy and Environment Reporter Ryan Van Velzer examined who is responsible for the pollution and who is affected by it. This week on In Conversation, WFPL's Rick Howlett talked to experts featured in that series about the state of air pollution in Louisville and what the community can do about it. Our guests were: Keith Talley Sr., Director of the Louisville Metro Air Pollution Control District Michele Roberts, National Co-Coordinator for the Environmental Justice Health Alliance Sarah Lynn Cunningham, environmental engineer

What's The Role Of The Community In Combating Louisville's Toxic Air Pollution?

As Disease Outbreaks Increase, Kentucky Grapples With Vaccine Awareness

In an update two weeks ago, U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said the recent measles outbreak has led to the most cases of the disease since 2000. Before 1963, in the decade before the measles vaccination was created, an estimated three to four million people were infected, and about 400 to 500 people died of the disease each year. But there's still some push-back against not only the measles vaccine, but vaccines in general. Opponents sometimes cite religious reasons or debunked studies linking vaccinations to autism as reasons not to be vaccinated. We discussed the outbreaks and the science on WFPL's In Conversation. Our guests included: Cameual Wright, Caresource Medical Director Jeff Howard, State Health Commissioner Dawn Balcom, University of Louisville Family Nurse Practitioner

Looking Back On Decades Of Kentucky Derby Memories

The Kentucky Derby tradition has grown and changed over the past 145 years in Louisville, creating epic moments and memorable scenes for people. We hear from Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert, the Kentucky Derby Museum's Chris Goodlett and historian Emily Bingham, as well as Louisvillians who celebrate the Derby in their own unique ways.

Panel: Police Aren't Racist, But Traffic Policies Must Change

Earlier this month, a Courier Journal story about a traffic stop involving Tae-Ahn Lea sparked public outrage. Lea, a black teenager, was pulled over for making a wide turn and ended up handcuffed and searched. Is this what's supposed to happen? Are LMPD traffic stops effective, or used as a way to harass and intimidate black drivers? WFPL's Rick Howlett talked with panelists to ask how traffic stops work and what the police and community can do to better their relationship. Our guests were: Jessica Green, 1st District Metro Councilperson Nicolai Jilek, President of the River City Fraternal Order of Police Keturah Herron, ACLU of Kentucky Field Organizer for Juvenile Justice

Crumbling Sewers, Flooding And Other Louisville Infrastructure Woes

Much of Louisville's infrastructure needs repairs, but the city has a long way to go before it can upgrade its aging systems. Meanwhile, residents in some Louisville neighborhoods are experiencing frequent flooding. This Week on In Conversation, we talk infrastructure: where we are, what needs to be done and where we're going. Our guests were: Tony Parrott, Executive Director, Louisville Metropolitan Sewer District Tom Rockaway, Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of Louisville Arnita Gadson, Executive Director, West Jefferson County Community Task Force Annie Haigler, Board Member, West Jefferson County Community Task Force

Here's How Louisville Arts Leaders Plan To Diversify Their Industry

As Louisville's art scene grows, so too has diversity and representation in the industry. One sign of that is new Actors Theatre of Louisville Artistic Director Robert Barry Fleming, the first non-white artistic director in the company's history. This Week on In Conversation, we talk about diversity in the arts community and what's being done to shine the spotlight on diverse voices both on and off the stage. Our guests were: Idris Goodwin, first black artistic director at Stage One Family Theater Shannon Woolley Allison, Co-Founder of Looking For Lilith Theater Company Stephen Reily, Speed Art Museum Director

The 2019 Kentucky Legislative Session Is Over — What Happened?

Legislators passed several bills during this year's legislative session affecting the state pension system, abortion, felony expungement, school safety and more. The session also brought a new round of protests in Frankfort from public school teachers, with rallies leading Jefferson County Public Schools to close for six days. Guest host Ryland Barton talks with a panel of state lawmakers to review this year's legislative session. Our guests were: Representative Attica Scott, Democrat from Louisville Representative Jason Nemes, Republican from Louisville Representative Kim Moser, Republican from Taylor Mill Senator Morgan McGarvey, Democrat from Louisville

JCPS Superintendent Sees Obstacles, Opportunities Ahead for Education

Debate on whether the state should manage the school system is ongoing, and JCPS teachers organized several "sickouts" to protest education-related bills in Frankfort this legislative session. This meant six days of school closures as teachers flooded the Capitol, and created obstacles for families juggling childcare. We'll talk with JCPS Superintendent Marty Pollio about the state of education and JCPS, recent legislation, his thoughts on the sickouts and more.

Derby Festival President Recounts Decades of Service, Talks Future of The Festival

The 2019 Kentucky Derby Festival expects to attract hundreds of thousands of people to the Louisville area for events like the Thunder Over Louisville fireworks display and the Pegasus Parade. This year's festival will be the last at the helm for its longtime leader: Kentucky Derby Festival President and CEO Mike Berry is retiring this year. We talk with Berry about his tenure, and we talk with KDF's Chief of Staff and Vice President of Communications about this year's events and how they stage the two-week festival. Our guests were: Kentucky Derby President and CEO Michael Berry Executive Vice President and Chief of Staff Stacey Robinson Vice President of Communications Aimee Boyd

Derby Festival President Recounts Decades of Service, Talks Future of The Festival

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