OH Really? WKSU covers a quarter of Ohio. That's a large chunk of the state, and we know there are stories out there you'd like to know more about--things that might make you go "oh really?" So we're starting "OH Really?" It's an initiative that makes you part of the news gathering process.Ask us anything, serious or not so serious. We welcome them all and will do our best to answer your questions.
OH Really?

OH Really?

From WKSU

WKSU covers a quarter of Ohio. That's a large chunk of the state, and we know there are stories out there you'd like to know more about--things that might make you go "oh really?" So we're starting "OH Really?" It's an initiative that makes you part of the news gathering process.Ask us anything, serious or not so serious. We welcome them all and will do our best to answer your questions.

Most Recent Episodes

Listeners Ask "OH Really?" About Northeast Ohio's Parks

Northeast Ohio has not one, not two, but three park systems that comprise about 70,000 acres of land – and almost 10 times that is protected throughout the state. Listeners have asked our "OH Really?" project how these parks got started. WKSU's Sarah Taylor and Kabir Bhatia answer some of their questions.

Listener Asks "OH Really?" Why Rubber Came to Akron

Firestone Country Club, Goodyear Heights and the B.F. Goodrich smokestacks are among the many reminders that the rubber industry once dominated the eyes, ears and nose of almost every Akronite. But why did the industry take root here, thousands of miles from the nearest rubber tree and hundreds of miles from the auto industry?

First Ladies National Historic Site Re-Opens Friday, With More Visitor Engagement Planned

The National Park Service is expanding its presence at the First Ladies National Historic Site in Canton. The site had been closed during the government shutdown but will reopen on Friday. A recent question to WKSU's "OH Really?" asked about the First Ladies National Historic Site in Canton. It opened in the mid-90s thanks to the efforts of Mary Regula — wife of Congressman Ralph Regula , who served the Canton area for 36 years. The National Park Service manages the site. Pamela Barnes,

First Ladies National Historic Site Re-Opens Friday, With More Visitor Engagement Planned

OH Really? Wonders How Houses Handle the Cold

Have you heard your house making strange, loud noises during the recent bitter cold weather? One of our listeners has and submitted a question about it to our new reporting project "OH Really?" Russell Stanton says he's lived in Ohio for 61 years and has rarely heard noises like this. Peter Paino from Paino Architects in Kent says he's heard them in his house too. He says it's likely the top quarter of your roof truss or the roof rafters. When it's so cold like this, they shrink rapidly and move

"OH Really?" It's Time to Eat With the Summit Food Coalition

Have you heard of the Summit Food Coalition ? It's been growing rapidly for the past year under its first full-time executive director. This week, "OH Really?" explains the coalition's mission to help feed Northeast Ohio. Tom Lukes wanted to know, "what is the food coalition and what is it trying to do in Northeast Ohio?" Lukes lives in Cuyahoga Falls. In warmer months, he calls his yard a "food forest" of peppers, tomatoes and eggplants. He asked about the Food Coalition because he wanted to

OH Really? Follows a Listener's Lead to the Once-Popular Blue Hole

Castalia, Ohio, is home to The Blue Hole, which was a tourist attraction for almost a century. WKSU's "OH Really?" finds out why it's been off-limits to the public for the last 29 years.

OH really? Listener Wonders About the Number of Dams Still in the Cuyahoga River

For the past 50 years, the Cuyahoga River's fortunes have risen and fallen just like the water that flows down the crooked channel and into Lake Erie. This week, we're answering our first question submitted by a listener as part of a new project we're calling, " OH Really ?" WKSU's Kabir Bhatia takes us on a river tour.

OH really? Listener Wonders About the Number of Dams Still in the Cuyahoga River

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