Still Working Everyone works. Not everyone works in the same way or with the same expectations; some people don't even collect a paycheck. But work shapes who we are, what we think, and how we view others. Created by Margaret J. Krauss and Kevin C. Brown, Still Working is a 10-episode audio documentary that profiles the experiences of western Pennsylvanians through their work.
Still Working

Still Working

From 90.5 WESA

Everyone works. Not everyone works in the same way or with the same expectations; some people don't even collect a paycheck. But work shapes who we are, what we think, and how we view others. Created by Margaret J. Krauss and Kevin C. Brown, Still Working is a 10-episode audio documentary that profiles the experiences of western Pennsylvanians through their work.

Most Recent Episodes

New Humans Need Food To Grow, And That Can Be A Lot Of Pressure

Andrea Slozna is a guidance counselor at the Environmental Charter School in Regent Square, as well as a mom to two tiny people. Both her 3-year-old daughter and 10-month-old son required intensive medical attention after their births, but she was able to nurse both of them. It can be a bumpy road, feeding a new person with one's body, especially when there's so much pressure in the first few months of a baby's life to ensure he or she gains weight, Slozna says.

'I'm A People Pleaser ... Food Is My Forte'

Carly Penn left the stress and late hours of restaurant kitchens behind when she became a chef at UMPC's Strabane Woods assisted living facility near Washington, Pa. At Strabane Woods, Penn works regular hours and knows well in advance what her menu is and how many portions she'll prepare. But once a week, she relives her restaurant days with a Friday morning treat: made-to-order eggs.

'We Call Ourselves Sugar Makers'

When maple sap emerges from a tree, it's a long way from its prized place at the breakfast table. Sap has a disappointing sugar content, just 1 or 2 percent, and doesn't taste sweet. Syrup-making hinges on removing most of the water in the sap, traditionally by boiling.

You Don't Have To Be A Famous Chef To Be A Food Star

The production and distribution of food in the U.S. is a lot of work. The industry employed more than one in 10 Americans in 2017, the most recent year for which data were available. The statistical umbrella includes everyone from waiters and truck drivers to farmers and ranchers, but doesn't count volunteers at food pantries and soup kitchens. Still Working wades into this diverse field, meeting a maple syrup producer in Somerset County, a nursing mother and school counselor in Pittsburgh, and

Cars, They Don't Break Like They Used To

Mike Kirsch has been working at Brunner's Garage on the South Side for more than 43 years. Over his career, car repair has changed quite a bit, he says. Even smaller jobs, like replacing headlight bulbs or rearview mirrors, have become more time consuming and expensive. But it is not all bad. "New cars ... don't break like they used to."

I Remembered You The Minute I Saw Your Molars

Dentist Lorraine Callen sees a lot of patients at Allegheny General Hospital. Using special magnifying lenses, called loupes, she is able to see their teeth much better. It has also played havoc with her memory. She can't always remember a patient by their name, but when she sees their teeth or an x-ray, "I can remember people's stories about their grandkids."

The Right Tool For The Job

The English language is loaded with idioms related to tools: tightening the screws, burying the hatchet, and hitting the nail on the head, to name just a few. But for automotive technician Andrew McHaney having the right tool for the job is much more than a metaphor.

Caution: Floor Slippery When Frozen

Gordon Nolan spends a lot of time on the ice, but rarely on skates. As the head of maintenance at Alpha Ice Complex in Harmar, it is his job to keep three ice rinks ready for hockey teams, figure skaters, and the public. In more than a decade of working on the ice, he has only fallen twice. "That's pretty good, I think."

Move Over Disruptors, Meet Pittsburgh's Maintainers

They're everywhere — creators, innovators, mavericks — and they sure do know how to suck all the air out of a room. But most of the world's work isn't making the newest technology or shaking up an entire industry, it's shepherding the things that already exist. The falls a figure skater won't take because the ice is perfect; the angst a patient won't feel because a dentist helps care for her teeth; the hours not spent roadside thanks to an automotive technician: this is the fruit the maintainers

No One Likes To Miss The Bus: How Commuters Make Room For One More

Community can exist in any place where two or more humans gather. Port Authority operator Jill Smallwood sees it at rush hour, as she drives the P1 route from downtown Pittsburgh to Swissvale and back again. As her bus gets crowded, Smallwood can't see all the way to the back of the bus, so she'll appeal to her riders, "Do we have any room in the back?" Most of the time, they make space for one more.

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