Still Working Everyone works. Not everyone works in the same way or with the same expectations; some people don't even collect a paycheck. But work shapes who we are, what we think, and how we view others. Created by Margaret J. Krauss and Kevin C. Brown, Still Working is a 10-episode audio documentary that profiles the experiences of western Pennsylvanians through their work.
Still Working

Still Working

From 90.5 WESA

Everyone works. Not everyone works in the same way or with the same expectations; some people don't even collect a paycheck. But work shapes who we are, what we think, and how we view others. Created by Margaret J. Krauss and Kevin C. Brown, Still Working is a 10-episode audio documentary that profiles the experiences of western Pennsylvanians through their work.

Most Recent Episodes

If At First You Don't Succeed ... You May Ruin Your Lawn

It is said that practice makes perfect. In the case of retired physician Demetrius Ellis, it also produces some divots in the backyard. After a neighbor introduced him to golf, Ellis spent hours practicing at home before he dared showing his face at a real golf course. In his retirement, Ellis has worked to find ways to stay in shape, both physically and mentally. Golf requires a lot of decisions — related to club choice, weather, terrain — to get the ball to the pin. "All those decisions ... keep

A Late-Blooming Love For The Game Of Golf

Retired pediatric nephrologist Dr. Demetrius Ellis has played sports his entire life: soccer, racquetball, tennis. But a sudden onset of tennis elbow in his 60s prompted his neighbor to introduce Ellis to golf. "I thought it was an extremely expensive sport for rich people who were very compulsive," Greece-born Ellis laughs. Ellis plays nearly every day at the public course, the Bob O'Connor Golf Course, in Pittsburgh's Schenley Park.

Looking For Work Is Tough On Even The Most Positive People

Shikha Goodwin moved to Pittsburgh last year with her husband, two small children, two cats, and all of her hopes and dreams to start a new job. The city has dealt her some tough blows and she is now looking for work. Even in the midst of her uncertainty and doubt, however, Goodwin says Pittsburgh has grown on her, thanks to moments like driving through the Fort Pitt Tunnel early in the morning.

The Antics Of A Red Squirrel On The Loose

Mary Sprajcar has volunteered at the Humane Animal Rescue Wildlife Center for nearly 10 years. In that time, she's seen her share of escape attempts. Volunteers spend a lot of time cleaning the temporary habitats of their patients, and doing so requires extra vigilance, as Sprajcar experienced two summers ago.

The Shoes Get Celebrity Treatment, But It Can Be Tough On The Body

Mario Ulizzi started training as a shoemaker in 1991. His then-girlfriend, now wife, Carla, came from a family of shoemakers, and her father suggested he try it. "It just became a part-time job and then a passion and a career," he says. But sometimes he worries about what the constant exposure to glue, shoe polish, and dust means for his health.

Off The Clock — For Very Different Reasons

Working for a wage is a big part of life for most adults in the United States. Since last August, Still Working explored what those jobs mean, or don't mean, to people, and how work affects how they view the world. The final episode of the series, however, looks past paid labor. Shihka Goodwin describes the difficulty of searching for a job. Mary Sprajcar discusses her volunteer labor at the Humane Animal Rescue Wildlife Center in Verona, Pa. And Dr. Demetrius Ellis reflects on his retirement

The Trouble With Ideals Of Appearance

Sadly, fitness does not work by the property of osmosis. Sitting next to an Adonis on the bus does not turn us all into museum-worthy Greek statues. It is a tough reality that means there is plenty of work out there for personal trainers. Still, the osmosis theory dies hard: personal trainers often face "pressure to look as fit as ... clients hope to be," says Nkem Chikwendu, a trainer at the JCC in Squirrel Hill.

Starting A Business Feels Like Sink Or Swim

Mobility researcher Brandon Daveler has spent years learning how to design and build better powered wheelchairs. But starting a company to sell the first model that can be fully submerged in water required a whole new education. "Business owners are the only people that will work an 80-hour week to avoid working 40 hours a week for somebody else," he laughs.

This Is Not A Pizza And Beer Operation

Moving can really test a friendship. (Why, dearest pal, am I carrying dozens of boxes filled, it seems, with bricks, to a third story walk-up on the hottest day of the year?) Such discomfort is traditionally smoothed over by food and drink. But professionals have a different approach, as Anthony Turner learned when he began working for a moving company more than seven years ago. Moving is "more than just putting stuff in a truck," he says.

Not All Syrup Has To Be Maple, But 'I Am Partial To It'

For sugarmaker Matthew Emerick there are few things more lovely than maple syrup on pancakes. He's a third-generation producer and can't imagine spring without tapping the maple trees in the family woods. But he acknowledges the attributes of other tree syrups, even if they're not for him.

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