Take My Word For It Today's professional needs to understand how to break through to their audience and make every moment count! WHRV's 'Take My Word For It' from local author and communications expert, Danny Rubin, aims to give professionals practical career advice to help write, speak, and lead with confidence...and he'll provide these tips in sixty seconds! Whether you desire to write a more effective resume, chair a more productive meeting or craft an email that is more likely to be read, 'Take My Word For It' can help!
Take My Word For It

Take My Word For It

From WHRV

Today's professional needs to understand how to break through to their audience and make every moment count! WHRV's 'Take My Word For It' from local author and communications expert, Danny Rubin, aims to give professionals practical career advice to help write, speak, and lead with confidence...and he'll provide these tips in sixty seconds! Whether you desire to write a more effective resume, chair a more productive meeting or craft an email that is more likely to be read, 'Take My Word For It' can help!

Most Recent Episodes

Number 1 Rule with Acronyms

Here's a simple communication tip. Whenever you use an acronym in your writing, always spell it out on first reference. Why? If you start off with an abbreviation, for instance, the FDA...you assume the reader knows what FDA means. And the first rule of strong communication...never assume the reader know anything. That means would spell out FDA, as in, the Food and Drug Administration. And from then on, you can use FDA...now that the reader knows what the letters mean. A little clarity goes a long way.

Why Less is More

Here's a professional tip: no one will ever complain you gave them less to read. Every time you write an email or document, ask yourself: Is this word necessary to make my point? What about the sentence? What about the entire paragraph? We all have short attention spans these days. Our goal as professionals is to bring the reader to the end of our message as soon as possible. Less. Is. More. I believe I've made my point. That means this radio segment is over.

Classic Grammar Mistake on Facebook

Have you ever seen this grammar mistake on Facebook?A friend will write, "Happy holidays from the Miller's!"But the word "Millers" has an apostrophe before the "s." That is incorrect. We use an apostrophe to show possession. As in, "The Miller's cat got out again." "Miller" apostrophe "s" cat. Miller's cat. When the word in question is plural, add the "s" and that's it. Your grammar-loving friends on Facebook will appreciate you.

Why Handwritten Notes Matter

We live in a digital age and don't often need to communicate via paper and pen. That means we cherish a handwritten note in which the person offers their thanks, condolences or congratulations. We save the notes at our desks or file them in a special drawer. We don't throw them out. If you want to leave an impression in the business world, then buy a pack of thank-you notes, a roll of stamps and locate a pen in blue or black ink. Then send handwritten notes when the moment requires one. That's the mark of a true leader.

Two Most Overused Words in LinkedIn Profiles

Take a look at your LinkedIn profile. If you're in a leadership role, do you see the verbs "manage" and "lead" over and over? When possible, avoid duplicate words because they water down your message. On second reference, swap out "manage" or "lead" with words like "oversee," "guide" or "supervise." A variety of leadership verbs will make your LinkedIn profile – or a professional bio, in general – more colorful and interesting. Word choice is a powerful tool as we promote ourselves.

Two Most Overused Words in LinkedIn Profiles

Planning a Meeting? Don't Forget This One Step.

Do you have a big meeting on the horizon in which you'll be in charge? Here's a critical piece of advice: set the agenda ahead of time. Don't walk in the room ready to wing it. Map out the discussion, put the agenda items on paper and think through how you plan to budget the time. For instance, consider lighter topics at the beginning so you make more time for weightier issues and broader discussion. Bottom line: have a plan. Run an efficient meeting. And let everyone go back to their desks. Office meeting hero.

Planning a Meeting? Don't Forget This One Step.

Say Goodbye to "I Don't Disagree"

Today, let's mark the official retirement of a worn-out expression we hear too often in business. "I don't disagree." What is so hard about saying the opposite – "I agree." It's OK to let others be right. In fact, when you validate someone's opinion, the approach allows the person to feel important. And, in turn, it makes the person respect you more. When you say, "I agree," everyone wins. "I don't disagree"? Welcome to retirement. Your work here is done.

Way to Prep for a Job Interview

Do you have a big job interview on the horizon? Before you step into the room, there's one page on the company's website you need to review. Why? 99% of job seekers will never check the page, and the extra effort might land you the job. The page? Press releases. Read about the company's latest achievements. Be prepared to talk comfortably about what you learned. The employer will be impressed you took the time to care about the company – and didn't just make the interview about you. Press releases. Find the page and watch what happens.

Smart Writing Tip for Freelancers

Are you a freelancer or looking for your next big gig? Here's a crucial tip for email outreach that will boost your response rate. In your email, make sure you prove you've done homework on the company where you want to freelance. That means visit the company's website and, in your email, highlight a blog post or piece of news that stands out to you. Make your email 100% customized. Take an interest in the employer first. That way, the employer will be more likely to take an interest in you.

Why You Should Always Provide Context

Ever seen this move on Facebook? Someone will post an update like, "So sorry to leave my job, but can't wait for my amazing new opportunity – exclamation mark prayer hands emoji." Then every single person who reads the update has the same question: "Well, what's the new job?" When you share big life moments on social media or through email, remember to actually share the life moment. Tell people about the new opportunity – your job title and the role you will play. Never leave your people in the dark.

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