Truth Be Told Truth Be Told, from KQED, is like the friend you call after a long, exhausting day – the one who will laugh, cry, bitch and moan with you. The one who gets it. Through unfiltered advice, host Tonya Mosley takes on listener questions, digging into what it means to not just survive, but thrive, as a person of color in our country. If Miss Manners tells you how to blend in and behave, Truth Be Told helps you be you in a world that doesn't always want you to be.
Truth Be Told

Truth Be Told

From KQED

Truth Be Told, from KQED, is like the friend you call after a long, exhausting day – the one who will laugh, cry, bitch and moan with you. The one who gets it. Through unfiltered advice, host Tonya Mosley takes on listener questions, digging into what it means to not just survive, but thrive, as a person of color in our country. If Miss Manners tells you how to blend in and behave, Truth Be Told helps you be you in a world that doesn't always want you to be.

Most Recent Episodes

Holding on to Joy

We're revisiting the first episode of Truth Be Told to take on one of the biggest questions of our time: How can I feel joy when the world is burning? We've witnessed uprisings demand justice for Black lives; we're still living in the grips of a pandemic that is disproportionately hurting communities of color, and every industry is being held accountable for racial justice. It feels like the world is unraveling – and yet we still want to laugh, dance, and love. Truth Be Told's host Tonya Mosley travels to her hometown of Detroit to talk with her grandmother, Ernestine Mosley and New York Times best-selling author adrienne maree brown. The three women share captivating conversations and life lessons on how we all can and should cultivate joy. Episode transcript: https://rb.gy/e1ik4k

Bonus: TBT Presents NPR's It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

We've got a special bonus in your Truth Be Told feed this week--it's from our friends at NPR's It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders. In this episode, Sam talks with author James McBride. McBride is the National Award-winning author of The Good Lord Bird and the best-selling memoir, The Color of Water. His latest book is Deacon King Kong, which is set against the backdrop of 1960s Brooklyn and tells the story of how one man's decision upended an entire neighborhood. Sam talks to McBride about race, religion and community, the parallels he sees to the world we are living in today, and why he's still optimistic, despite protests and a pandemic.

Coming Out While Staying In: Dealing With Homophobia At Home

How do you maintain a relationship with your homophobic family when you're financially dependent on them? How do you manage these relationships while sheltering-in-place? We talk to a queer college student who's out at school but feels unaccepted at home. Wise One Steven Canals, co-creator of FX's Pose joins us to discuss growing up gay in the Bronx, what character in the show is most like his mother and ways to find community apart from your family. Episode transcript here: https://rb.gy/lmtyrg

Protesting For The Soul of America: The New Civil Rights Movement

Millions have taken to the streets to protest the police killing of George Floyd and systemic racism that black people are subjected to everyday. Wise One Dr. Eddie Glaude says we are seeing the accumulation of grief, disregard and contempt for black lives. He is the chair of Princeton's African American Studies Department and joins Tonya this week to parse out nationwide actions and to recenter black joy and resilience. Episode transcript here: shorturl.at/lpEF6

You're OK, I'm Not: Black Men & Therapy

We're making space for something we don't talk a lot about - the mental health burdens of black men. In this week's episode, we have three Wise Ones - Bakari Sellers, author and CNN commentator, Karamo Brown from "Queer Eye" and Ron Finley, the Gangsta Gardener. They offer wisdom on meeting the needs of their heart and minds as black men in white America. Episode Transcript here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1qlnHaSaoseLFFtcn2Afxkv-fuzxnVmd0/view

Mom, We Need A Break

This Mother's Day we tackle the complicated relationship some women of color have with their mothers. This episode's Wise One is Kulap Vilaysack who shares lessons from her experience in mending her relationship with her Lao refugee mother. Episode transcript here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1ub7UippPt6uu1BMTKZGu1Y6hdesnjrDR/view

Deportation Wounds

Before physical distancing, seeing loved ones through a screen was already "normal" for our producer Isabeth Mendoza. Her dad was deported 11 years ago. Since then, her family was doing their best to cope , but they have not healed. Now, Isabeth wants to work towards a future that she's always imagined — one where her family is thriving regardless of borders. Wise One and Latinx Therapy founder Adriana Alejandre, LMFT offers some advice. Episode Transcript here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1F8Y99rx0vbRap7CrZom_SZyv7Tk13lBM/view

White World, Black Body

Wise Ones Virgie Tovar and Chloe Hilliard move in this world as big women. They've faced covert fatphobia from doctors and co-workers and even experienced it on dates. Being a fat person of color means confronting the intersection of being unseen and taking up too much space. You don't have to stand there. Episode transcript can be found here.

'Rona and Racism: A Survival Guide

Public health emergencies hit differently for people of color. Historical trauma and lack of systemic trust all contribute to deep angst. As both a medical doctor and journalist, Dr. Seema Yasmin answers your questions about living in the time of COVID-19 as a person of color, and offers some validation - "We have the right to feel whatever we feel." Episode transcript can be found here.

Healing for Black America

Healing for Black America

"How are Black Americans expected to overcome and thrive in this country without the necessary mechanisms of healing?" Tonya called on the help of two Wise Ones for this question. Ibram X. Kendi gives helpful framing on how to even start thinking about this and Kiese Laymon offers a dive deep into Black healing in America. Have a question for the show? Email us at truthbetold@kqed.org, call us at (415) 553-2802 or use the hashtag #AskTBT. Follow us at @truthbetoldkqed on Twitter and Instagram. Episode transcript can be found here.

Back To Top