GLT's McHistory McHistory goes back in time to explore big moments and small stories from McLean County history. McHistory episodes can be heard periodically on GLT's Sound Ideas. The series is produced in partnership with the McLean County Museum of History.
GLT's McHistory

GLT's McHistory

From WGLT

McHistory goes back in time to explore big moments and small stories from McLean County history. McHistory episodes can be heard periodically on GLT's Sound Ideas. The series is produced in partnership with the McLean County Museum of History.

Most Recent Episodes

McHistory: Bloomington-Normal's Last Switchboard Girls

In 1935, switchboard operators for the Wabash Telephone Company handled an average of 60,000 calls coming through its downtown Bloomington building. This episode of McHistory tells the story of how Bloomington-Normal switchboard girls responded to the introduction of automatic dial systems. This episode of McHistory was produced by WGLT's Mary Cullen, featuring Bill Kemp and Hannah Johnson of the McLean County Museum of History. Subscribe to the McHistory podcast on Apple Podcasts, Spotify, or

McHistory: Illinois' First Female State Senator

In the decade after women's suffrage, leaders of the female empowerment movement were eager to become more involved in governmental affairs. This episode of McHistory honors Illinois' first female state senator, and the inspiration for the McLean County League of Women Voters. WGLT's Mary Cullen produced this episode of McHistory, featuring Bill Kemp and Candace Summers of the McLean County Museum of History. People like you value experienced, knowledgeable and award-winning journalism that

McHistory: Bloomington's Favorite Son

On the Fourth of July weekend in 1956, one of Bloomington's most famous residents returned to rally support ahead of the presidential election.

McHistory: Civil Rights Before The Movement

Dr. Eugene Covington was the first and only African American physician in McLean County in the early 20th century.

McHistory: Voices Of The Past Come Alive

Here is a story of hooligans, pranks, and university hijinks from the early part of the last century. It's part of McHistory, GLT's occasional series using letters, articles, and diaries from McLean County citizens written in times gone by.

McHistory: The Roots Of Feminism

From 1892 to the early 1930s professor June Rose Colby taught literature, grammar, and composition at Illinois State Normal University. One of the first female professors at the university, Colby was a pioneer for feminism.

McHistory: Civil War Letter Home After Battle

And now, one of GLT's recurring features during Sound Ideas using letters, articles, and diaries from McLean County citizens written in times gone by. Today's McHistory is about the Civil War Battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, which took place Dec. 7, 1862. G.W. Howser died about a year and a half after writing the letter, on July 29th 1864 when the regiment was in Brownsville, Texas. Contributors to this episode of McHistory include Museum Archivist Bill Kemp and Director Greg Koos and was

McHistory: Humor In A Governor's Veto From 60 Years Gone By

Next month, the Illinois General Assembly returns to Springfield for its annual fall veto session in which it considers whether to override the governor's rejections and changes to bills passed by lawmakers.

McHistory: Workin' In A Coal Mine

At the turn of the 20th century, a certain woman journalist put out four columns a week. She was a prolific writer turning in 2,000 words at a crack, a wonderful interviewer, and nobody's fool. Madam Annette talked with everyone from businessmen and public officials to jail inmates. During GLT's recurring series McHistory we hear portions of one of Madam Annette's columns as she explores a coal mine under Bloomington. McLean County Museum of History Development Director Beth Whisman reads the

McHistory: The Winter Of Deep Snow

In 1824 the area that would become McLean County had only 15 settler families. By 1830 when the county came into being the population was still very sparse.

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