Basic Black Produced live at WGBH Studios in Boston, Basic Black is the longest-running program on public television focusing on the interests of people of color. The show, which was originally called Say Brother, was created in 1968 during the height of the civil rights movement as a response to the demand for public television programs reflecting the concerns of communities of color. Each episode features a panel discussion across geographic borders and generational lines with the most current stories, interviews and commentaries.
Basic Black

Basic Black

From WGBH Radio

Produced live at WGBH Studios in Boston, Basic Black is the longest-running program on public television focusing on the interests of people of color. The show, which was originally called Say Brother, was created in 1968 during the height of the civil rights movement as a response to the demand for public television programs reflecting the concerns of communities of color. Each episode features a panel discussion across geographic borders and generational lines with the most current stories, interviews and commentaries.

Most Recent Episodes

Success in Education: Boston Public Schools and Students of Color

This week, Massachusetts state legislators approved a big boost in K-12 school funding. Now awaiting Governor Baker's signature, the Student Opportunity Act would pump 1.5 billion dollars in schools which have been chronically underfunded. The history of education has been ripe with controversy...from the legacy of busing and issues around disparity to opportunities to attend exam schools and reports of re-segregation. How do educators build success for students and close the achievement gap? Callie Crossley hosts Phillip Martin, Sr. Investigative Reporter, NECIR and WGBH News Edith Bazile, President of BEAM - Black Educator's Alliance of Massachusetts Milly Arbaje Thomas, C-E-O of Metropolitan Council for Education Opportunity Inc, or METCO Dr. Brenda Cassellius, Superintendent, Boston Public Schools.

Review and analysis of The Impeachment Hearings

Will the impeachment hearings make a difference in the mind of citizens and will it impact the upcoming election? Panelists: Phillip Martin, Sr. Investigative Reporter, WGBH News Marcus Walker, a humanities and history teacher at Fenway High school. He also teaches at Harvard University Prof. Paul Watanabe, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Institute for Asian American studies at UMass Boston Ivan (EVON) Espinoza- Madrigal, Executive Director of the Lawyers for Civil Rights Callie Crossley hosts

Winning the Votes of Black Women

The courting of the Black Women's vote. Both Democrat and the President are looking for votes from women voters — in particular female voters of color. Will both parties take this important voting bloc serious of merely take them for granted? Parson Hicks. She was a 2016 elected At-Large Massachusetts Delegate to the R-N-C Convention and is currently a Registrar for the City of Manchester. Sharon Stout, Deputy Treasurer for the Mass. Dems. She is also the co-chair for the Newton Democrats and a board member of the Emerge Massachusetts chapter, an organization that helps women prepare and run for office Kim McLarin, Assoc. Prof. of Writing, Literature and Publishing, Emerson College Callie Crossley Moderates

The history of 1619 and the film, "Harriet"

The 400th anniversary of the first enslaved Africans to arrive to America and Harriet Tubman — the most well-known conductor on the Underground Railroad, and her amazing story, now portrayed in a newly released film, "Harriet." Panelists: Marita Rivero, President and C-E-O of the Museum of African American History. She is also a former VP and General Manager of Radio and Television, here at WGBH Dr. Kellie Carter Jackson, Asst. Prof. of Africana Studies at Wellesley College. She is the author of, "Force & Freedom: Black Abolitionists and the Politics of Violence" Renee Graham, Assoc. Editor and Opinion Columnist for The Boston Globe Kim McLarin, Assoc. Prof. of Writing, Literature and Publishing, Emerson College. She is also a columnist, for the Washington Post's "The Lily." Callie Crossley, hosts.

Horror Noire

Recent films like "Get Out," "Us," "Ma" and the upcoming remake of "Candyman" Black horror genre is on the rise. Now, with the explosion of the genre has come new opportunities for actors of color and for Black filmmakers to express their visions and for audiences of all kinds to see new and complex reflections of Black life, all through the lens of horror. Guest Panelists: Actor, Naheem Garcia. He is also a Director & Educator Arjun Singh, Producer, WGBH, Boston Public Radio, 89.7 Lisa Simmons, Founder and artistic director of the Roxbury international Film Festival. She is also the President of the Color of Film Collaborative Filmmaker and Director, Vladimir Minuty Kim McLarin, hosts

Equity in the Cannabis Industry

Massachusetts, along with 11 other states, have legalized marijuana opening up business opportunities in product production and sales. Communities of color were dis-proportionately impacted by past drug policies, and have long argued that they should benefit from the fast growing trade. Who gets a seat at the table and will more entrepreneurs of color get into the growing industry? Chauncy Spencer, Founder of High Tech Farms. He is also an economic empowerment applicant Cynthia Mompoint, is an economic empowerment applicant and the co-founder of Danbala Group along with her husband Moor Stringer Tito Jackson, C-E-O of Verdant Medical, a vertically integrated-recreational marijuana organization that plans stores in Boston, Provincetown, and a store and cultivation facility in Rowley, Mass Richard Harding, Co-founder of Real Action for Cannabis Equity, or R-A-C-E, and President of the Green Soul Foundation Callie Crossley hosts

Diversity in Golf

Golden State Warrior basketball player Steph Curry made a donation to Howard University to help revive their golf program. What is the history and legacy of the game? Who takes up the sport and what are the barriers to entry for both professional and novice players of color? Keith McDermott, 3 Point Foundation Sekou Morrison, co-producer of the Morrison Golf Classic, an annual African-American amateur golf tournament on Cape Cod Dr. Traci Parker, Asst. Prof. of Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst Marcos Baugh Founder, Urban Golf Club Corp. Chris Collins hosts

Fear of the Other

The panel discusses a number of incidents from the summer from President Trump's "go back" comment to four Congresswomen of color, a shooting in El Paso, Texas to the Straight Pride Parade in Boston and the impact on people of color who feel targeted. Phillip Martin, Senior Investigative Reporter, WGBH News *Michael Jeffries, *Associate Professor of American studies at Wellesley college. He's also the author of, "Paint the White House Black: Barack Obama And the Meaning of Race in America." Dr. Cecil Webster, Jr, **a psychiatrist & psychotherapist. **He is also a lecturer in psychiatry at Harvard Medical School Ivan Espinoza-Madrigal, Executive Director of The Lawyers for Civil Rights

2017 Local and State Elections

Basic Black discussed 2017 local elections featuring candidates of color who had to appeal to majority-white voting blocs: Yvonne Spicer, Lydia Edwards, and Tito Jackson. Panelists: Kim McLarin, associate professor at Emerson College; Phillip Martin, WGBH senior investigative reporter; Ken Cooper, WGBH senior editor; and Kevin Peterson, founder/executive director of The New Democracy Coalition.

The Democratic Presidential Debates - who came out ahead?

A wrap-up of the first Democratic Presidential Debates and reaction. There were 20 candidates split over two nights presenting their reasons why they are the best choice for president. Despite the number, there were a few candidates that stood out from the pack. Also, did the 2020 candidates vying for the presidency address important issues that impacts communities of color? Panelists: Rahsaan Hall, Director of the Racial Justice Program at the ACLU of Massachusetts Michael Jeffries, associate Professor of American studies at Wellesley College. He's also the author of, "Paint the white house black: Barack Obama and the meaning of race in America." Paul Watanabe, Director of the Institute for Asian American studies and Professor of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts, Boston. Kim McLarin, Associate Professor of Writing, Literature and Publishing at Emerson College. She is also the Author of the Book, "Womanish."

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