Basic Black Produced live at WGBH Studios in Boston, Basic Black is the longest-running program on public television focusing on the interests of people of color. The show, which was originally called Say Brother, was created in 1968 during the height of the civil rights movement as a response to the demand for public television programs reflecting the concerns of communities of color. Each episode features a panel discussion across geographic borders and generational lines with the most current stories, interviews and commentaries.
Basic Black

Basic Black

From WGBH Radio

Produced live at WGBH Studios in Boston, Basic Black is the longest-running program on public television focusing on the interests of people of color. The show, which was originally called Say Brother, was created in 1968 during the height of the civil rights movement as a response to the demand for public television programs reflecting the concerns of communities of color. Each episode features a panel discussion across geographic borders and generational lines with the most current stories, interviews and commentaries.

Most Recent Episodes

Roe v. Wade Overturned

June 24: Roe v Wade has been overturned. In a highly controversial decision, the Supreme Court overturned the landmark decision from 1973 that gave people the right to have an abortion. The panel discusses what happens next regarding the ruling's impact on birthing individuals of color as well as issues affecting same sex marriages, trans rights, teaching health and wellness in schools, the ability to cross state lines, cost and finding health services. Panelists: Renée Landers, Professor of Law, Faculty Director of the Health and Biomedical Law Concentration and the Master of Science in Law: Life Sciences program at Suffolk University Law School in Boston Iván Espinoza-Madrigal, Executive Director for Lawyers for Civil Rights in Boston Renée Graham, Associate Editor and Opinion Columnist for the Boston Globe's op-ed page Chastity Bowick, executive director of the Transgender Emergency Fund of MA Callie Crossley hosts.

Black Maternal Healthcare

The road to motherhood raises a range of emotions and questions from what to expect when expecting to people telling soon-to-be moms, "You glow." But the joy of motherhood for Black and other women of color is fraught in continual racial disparities in maternal healthcare. Research suggests having a health practitioner of color or using a doula provides improved outcomes and an easier pregnancy. However many women and people of color face the risk of dying in childbirth. What can be done to help them to receive the medical care necessary? Panelists: Dr. Ndidiamaka (IN-DeeDee-AH-mah-KAH) Amutah-Onukagha (AH-muh-TAH – OH-noo-KAH-GAH) Assistant Dean, Associate Professor, and Founder of the Center for Black Maternal Health and Reproductive Justice at Tufts University. Ketura'h Edwards-Robinson, MSN, Nurse Practitioner and Manager of the Maternal Child Health Program at the Dimock Center in Roxbury, Massachusetts. Rep. Liz Miranda, State Representative for Suffolk County's 5th District. Her district comprises parts of Roxbury and the Dorchester neighborhoods of Boston. She is also running for State Senator for the Second Suffolk district. Callie Crossley hosts.

The Rise of Race-Based Violence, Hate and Discrimination

The rise of race-based violence, hate and discrimination This week the episode will look at recent mass shooting deaths of African Americans in Buffalo as well as Africans and African Americans caught in Russia's conflict with Ukraine and how the globalization of discrimination, bigotry and hate, intersects in our lives. We'll also discuss treatment of refugees when they are resettled in the U.S. How are people of color impacted by the rise of devastating race-based violence, hate crimes, and discrimination both here and abroad? Panelists: Iván Espinoza-Madrigal, Executive Director, Lawyers for Civil Rights in Boston. Dr. Sandra Mattar (MAH-tar), Clinical Psychologist, assistant professor, AND Director of Training at the Immigrant and Refugee Health Center, Boston Medical Center. Dr. Clarence Lusane, Professor of Political Science and Director of the International Affairs program, Howard University. and by PHONE, EVA CASTILLO, Director of the New Hampshire Alliance for Immigrants and Refugees for MIRA, the Massachusetts Immigrant and Refugee Advocacy Coalition. Phillip Martin hosts.

Food Access and Culturally relevant food in communities

May 13 Basic Black: Food Justice in the Community This week, a conversation about the lack of accessible, affordable, and culturally relevant food in communities of color and its intersectionality into health, economic development, and day-to-day living for people. Panelists: Hae In Kim, Deputy Director of Planning & Development, The Mayor's Office of Food Justice Vivien Morris, RDN, LDN, MPH, MS, Founder, Mattapan Food & Fitness Coalition Cassandria Campbell, Co-Founder, Fresh Food Generation Patricia Spence, President, and CEO, Urban Farming Institute Callie Crossley hosts.

Roe v. Wade / Honoring Black Authors and Literature

African American writers tell stories that celebrate and document the black experience, allowing readers to reflect and learn about the history of African American life. The removal of books by authors of color from libraries and black-owned bookstores closing raise concerns over preserving Black books. What happens if these works from African American culture disappear for good? First, Prof. Renee Landers from Suffolk University School of Law discusses the implications of what the leaked opinion to overturn Roe v. Wade could mean for Black women and women of color. Panelists: Carmen Fields is an award-winning TV host, journalist, and writer AND is being honored for contributing her collection of books written by Black authors to the Salem State University Library. Marita Golden, is a literary consultant, writing coach, and an award-winning author of many books including her book, "The Strong Black Woman," and the co-founder of The Hurston/Wright Foundation. Kim McLarin, Professor and Interim Dean of Graduate and Professional Studies at Emerson College. She is also an award-winning author of several books. Her latest is, "James Baldwin's Another Country: Bookmarked." Caroline Kautsire, Professor, at Bunker Hill Community College and author of, "What Kind of Girl?

William Monroe Trotter - His legacy and influence on a new generation

This week the episode will discuss William Monroe Trotter, the co-founder and editor of the Boston Guardian newspaper. Trotter was known for his rigorous, sometimes sharp debate. He wasn't shy about having challenging conversations with his peers and the President of the United States. Trotter's discourse matched his deep investment in exposing and doing away with racial inequity at the time. He grew up in Hyde Park and was the first African American man to earn a Phi Beta Kappa membership at Harvard. The episode will discuss the civil rights activist as well as how his actions influence and impact a new generation of activists. Guest Panelists: Reverend Cornell William Brooks, Professor and Director for The William Monroe Trotter Collaborative for Social Justice at Harvard Kennedy School's Center for Public Leadership. He is also the former President of the NAACP. Dr. Paula Austin, Assistant Professor of History and African American Studies at Boston University Deborah Douglas, Co-Editor-in-Chief of The Emancipator. Lalou Trotter Dammond is the Director for Craftwork Production and a direct descendent of William Monroe Trotter. Crystal Haynes hosts.

Community Wealth Building helps raise a neighborhood

Building Community Wealth Community wealth building is an economic model that provides neighborhoods and communities a seat at the table, where they can invest –and utilize their time and talent to create an equitable community for all. Can community wealth building help close the racial wealth gap and increase economic prosperity? Teri Williams, President and C-O-O of One-United Bank. She is also the Board Chair, Black Economic Council of Massachusetts (BECMA). Nia K. Evans, Executive Director of the Boston Ujima Project Nia Grace, owner of Darryl's Corner Bar & Kitchen, The Underground Café + Lounge, co-founder of the Boston Black Hospitality Coalition Turahn Dorsey, Co-founder of the Jazz Urbane Cafe development in the historic Bolling Building. He is also a member of the GBH Board of Advisors. Callie Crossley hosts.

Basic Black: Running for Health, Wellness, Fitness and Community

In advance of the Boston Marathon, we'll speak with runners and organizers of community events helping to expand running programs, not only for health and wellness in communities of color but also as a powerful vehicle for social justice. Included in the discussion, we'll also address how organizers of the marathon have faced criticism around the lack of diversity and inclusion, and how they are working with groups to create partnerships and community engagement. Our Panelists: Adrienne Benton, member, B.A.A. Board of Governors, member of the National Black Marathoners Association and a Black Girls RUN! member Thaddeus Miles, founder of Hood Fit. He is also an award-winning photographer and Director of Community Services at MassHousing Ruben Sança, a 2012 Olympian and Assistant Athletics Director for Administration at UMass Lowell. He is also a USATF Level 1 Certified Coach, co-chair for the Adult & Youth Running Cohort, Boston Running Collaborative. Charles Anderson, M.D., MPH, MBA, President & CEO, Dimock Community Health Center Callie Crossley hosts.

Basic Black: Affordable Housing

This week the panelists will discuss issues around affordable housing--rent costs, neighborhood gentrification, the housing boom and people moving away from Boston to neighboring cities due to the cost or priced out of neighborhoods. The group will also discuss racial gap in homeownership. Our Panelists: Emilio Dorcely, CEO of Urban Edge in Roxbury and a member of Boston's Rent Stabilization Advisory Committee Chrystal Kornegay, Executive Director of MassHousing in Boston.* joins via post-show Malia Lazu, CEO & Founder of The Lazu Group and Lecturer at the MIT Sloan School of Management John B. Cruz III, President and CEO of Cruz Companies in Roxbury. Crystal Haynes hosts.

A New Justice: The Supreme Court Nomination of Ketanji Brown Jackson

There are 240 African American Judges on the Federal Courts, all are over 65, and only four are women. If confirmed Ketanji Brown Jackson is set to become the first African American woman, and one of the youngest to hold a seat on the Supreme Court. The Senate Judiciary Committee is scheduled to vote on Monday, April 4. What's in store for Judge Jackson as she moves a step closer to potentially becoming the new Associate Justice of the Supreme Court? Panelists: Renée Graham, Associate Editor and Opinion Columnist for the Boston Globe's op-ed page Renée Landers, JD. Professor of Law, Suffolk University Law School in Boston Tracey Maclin, JD. Professor of Law, Boston University School of Law Cecil Webster Jr., MD. an Adult, Adolescent, and Child Psychiatrist & Psychotherapist Callie Crossley hosts.