Under the Radar with Callie Crossley Under the Radar with Callie Crossley looks to alternative presses and community news for stories that are often overlooked by big media outlets. In our roundtable conversation, we aim to examine the small stories before they become the big headlines with contributors in Boston and New England. For more information, visit our website: https://www.wgbh.org/news/under-the-radar-with-callie-crossley
Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley

From WCRB

Under the Radar with Callie Crossley looks to alternative presses and community news for stories that are often overlooked by big media outlets. In our roundtable conversation, we aim to examine the small stories before they become the big headlines with contributors in Boston and New England. For more information, visit our website: https://www.wgbh.org/news/under-the-radar-with-callie-crossley

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The Buzz Around Massachusetts Pollinator Week

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23rd Roxbury Film Festival Celebrates Black Voices In Film

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LGBTQ News: Corporate America Turns Rainbow for Pride Month, Social Media Platforms Now Le...

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Encore: Celebrating Juneteenth In Boston

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Book Club: 2021 Summer Reading Recommendations From Three Local Librarians

Flowers in full bloom, warm breezes, brilliant sunlight — nature offers us the flawless qualities of summer. And this summer, especially, we are eager to leave behind the ever-present blue light of our computer screens for the blue skies of New England's shortest season. With vaccinations up and pandemic restrictions easing, we summer readers are ready to take our novels out for a day on the beach, explore literary adventures under the shade of a tree, or venture back into the nearest public library. And three of our local librarians are here with 2021's best stories — from fantasy worlds to real-life social dilemmas — it's our annual summer reading special. Guests: Susannah Borysthen-Tkacz — senior librarian at the Cambridge Public Library Robin Brenner — teen librarian at the Public Library of Brookline Veronica Koven-Matasy — reader services specialist at the Boston Public Library

Book Club: 2021 Summer Reading Recommendations From Three Local Librarians

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Environmental News: Super Pollutants Lurking In Your AC, Biden's Support For Electric Cars...

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What's Behind The Rise In Suicides Among Black Youth?

This week will mark the one-year anniversary of George Floyd's murder by the recently convicted former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin. And, Floyd's death was followed by several high-profile acts of racism linked to trauma and measurable PTSD in communities of color. What role has the seemingly never-ending racial trauma played in the uptick of suicidal deaths among young African Americans? And shockingly, why are some mental health specialists surprised the rate of suicides isn't higher? Guests: Dahyana Schlosser — Boston-based child and family therapist Dr. Rheeda Walker — professor at the University of Houston Department of Psychology, author of "The Unapologetic Guide to Black Mental Health" Joseph Feaster Jr. — suicide loss survivor, council member at Samaritans, executive committee member at the National Association of Mental Health Boston If you or a loved one is considering suicide, please call The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline: 1-800-273-8255.

Mass Politics Profs: Biden Praises Baker For Pandemic Leadership

Critics complain about Gov. Baker's handling of the COVID-19 crisis, but the Biden administration gives him high marks. Boston's mayor's race — the most diverse field ever — guarantees the city's first nonwhite mayor. And Republican governors slash unemployment benefits, saying forcing people off the rolls will combat a labor shortage. We're spending the full hour with the Mass Politics Profs. Guests: Erin O'Brien — associate professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts Boston Rob DeLeo — associate professor of public policy at Bentley University Peter Ubertaccio — founding dean of the Thomas and Donna May School of Arts and Sciences, and associate professor of political science at Stonehill College SHOW CREDITS: Under the Radar with Callie Crossley is a production of GBH, produced by Hannah Uebele and Angela Yang, and engineered by Dave Goodman. Our theme music is FISH AND CHIPS by #weare2saxys', Grace Kelly and Leo P.

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