KNBA News The news and views from 90.3 KNBA, Alaska's Native Voice.
KNBA News

KNBA News

From KNBA

The news and views from 90.3 KNBA, Alaska's Native Voice.

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Ivory workshop gives a place for struggling Anchorage carvers to work

In a cluttered downtown Anchorage workshop, Leon Misak Kinneeveauk pondered what to do with small walrus skull on an afternoon in late October. "I think I'm gonna make a mask out of that," he said. Kinneeveauk owns Arctic Treasures, a gallery and the workshop attached to the back on Fourth Avenue . All around him, beside drills and sanders, were the raw supplies for his work: Piles of antlers, heaps of whale vertebrae, scraps of baleen crammed into jars. Much of the material is sourced from the

Ivory workshop gives a place for struggling Anchorage carvers to work

Tlingit potatoes continue to thrive thanks to Sitka Tribe, Forest Service

For the third year in a row, the Sitka Tribe of Alaska partnered with the Forest Service to grow Tlingit potatoes . Alaska Natives have cultivated these tubers in Southeast for several hundred years. Now, the Tribe is trying to raise the profile of the crop both as an important cultural link and as a potential tool in its drive for food security. In the Forest Service parking lot, David Kanosh is thanking the various clans of the region before sharing the history of the Tlingit potato with a

Tlingit potatoes continue to thrive thanks to Sitka Tribe, Forest Service

U.S. Senate passes bill with funds for murdered and missing indigenous women

WASHINGTON – The U.S. Senate agreed to spend $6.5 million to tackle the epidemic of missing and murdered indigenous women . It's a small line-item within a massive spending package, but it's one Sen. Lisa Murkowski is proud to have included. "That opens up funding to go ... to investigate cold cases and just really put some energy behind this issue," Murkowski said. Spotty data makes it hard for researchers to quantify the killings and disappearances of Native women. The spending bill directs the

U.S. Senate passes bill with funds for murdered and missing indigenous women

Yup'ik Elders revive traditional baby parka

Sewing atasuaq, traditional baby parkas , was almost a lost skill until a Yup'ik Elder helped revive it. And the result? An atasuaq, sewed with bird skin, from the coastal village of Toksook Bay. Ann Fienup-Riordan unrolls a package wrapped in muslin. She's an anthropologist who has documented Yup'ik life in Western Alaska for decades. The parka is roughly 2 feet long, just big enough to fit a 9-pound baby. The bird skin facing the outside feels like toughened leather, with the feathers tucked

'Landless' tribes stake out selections of the Tongass

Some Southeast Alaska tribal communities who were excluded from forming village corporations in the 1970s continue to push for a land settlement. Residents and descendants of natives in Wrangell, Petersburg, Tenakee Springs, Ketchikan and Haines call themselves landless tribes . The effort backed by Sealaska Corporation , has released a series of maps with acreage they'd like sliced out of Tongass National Forest. A multi-million-dollar federal settlement to Tlingit and Haida tribal members over

'Landless' tribes stake out selections of the Tongass

Juneau immersion classroom aims to teach new generation of Lingít speakers

Most fluent speakers of the Lingít language are elders. But the instructors of an immersion classroom in Juneau have high hopes: to raise a new generation of Lingít speakers . When you step inside the Haa Yóo X̱ʼatángi Kúdi classroom, two rules are immediately clear: shoes off, and Lingít only. At least for the adults. Haa Yóo X̱ʼatángi Kúdi means "our language's nest," or "our language nest." Daaljíni Mary Cruise is the lead instructor and administrator of the program. She didn't grow up

Juneau immersion classroom aims to teach new generation of Lingít speakers

Sea ice a long ways off from Western Alaska

With a poor start for ice forming in northern Alaska waters this season, the latest climate forecasts predict sea ice may not reach Western Alaska until December. According to the National Weather Service , sea ice has started to form along the upper coast of the North Slope on the Chukchi side, as well as in several places throughout the Beaufort Sea. However according to climatologist Rick Thoman, the Chukchi Sea currently has the least amount of ice its ever had. "Here in Western Alaska I

Learning Yup'ik on the go: A new language app for Bristol Bay

Atkiq Michelle Ilutsik-Snyder and Diane Wetter are trying out a new way to learn Yup'ik during a conference at the Bristol Bay Campus in Dillingham . "All right! So we're looking at the Yugtun app. Lesson three: foods. So we're going to learn," Ilutsik-Snyder said, starting them off. The Yugtun language app has games and lessons, accompanied by pictures of local people acting out words and phrases. It was put together by Arnaq Esther Ilutsik, the director of Yup'ik studies for the Southwest

Da Ku Cultural Centre celebrates 150 years of the Kohklux map

Yukon First Nations and Alaska Natives gathered Saturday at the Da Ku Cultural Centre in Haines Junction to celebrate the 150th anniversary of the Kohklux map . That's the oldest map of the Southern Yukon region from Klukwan, Alaska to Fort Selkirk in the Yukon Territory. The maps are kept in a climate controlled room in the Da Ku center while they are on loan from the Bancroft Library. Tom Buzzell is a local expert on the maps. He also shares a traditional name with Kohklux. As visitors filter

Cemetery caretaker calls on community to clean, protect Alaska Native graves

Many Alaska Native gravesites in Juneau are overgrown and all but forgotten . Tlingit storyteller and cemetery caretaker Bob Sam hopes to change that. He led a tour through Juneau's cemeteries during the Sharing Our Knowledge conference in September to raise awareness and respect for the graves and the ancestors buried in them. A couple dozen people fill the seats of a small tour bus. It's standing room only and at the front is Bob Sam. He introduces himself as "just a simple caretaker." Sam

Cemetery caretaker calls on community to clean, protect Alaska Native graves

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