Pardon Me – Another Damn Impeachment Show Does the Trump impeachment drama feel like drinking from a fire hose? If so, join host Colin McEnroe, public radio personality and columnist, for an energetic weekly round-up that brings you the latest developments and perspectives from guests like Dave Eggers, Adam Gopnik, Emily Bazelon and Dahlia Lithwick among other journalists, novelists, ethicists, essayists and podiatrists.*"Pardon Me" also airs on Connecticut Public Radio Saturdays at noon.Not to be confused with a podcast of a similar name, Colin may do occasional kettlebell workouts, but they won't be a big part of the show. And make sure you are not actually drinking from a fire hose, because that's very dangerous.*Only if Gordon Sondland develops specific foot ailments.
Pardon Me – Another Damn Impeachment Show

Pardon Me – Another Damn Impeachment Show

From Connecticut Public Radio

Does the Trump impeachment drama feel like drinking from a fire hose? If so, join host Colin McEnroe, public radio personality and columnist, for an energetic weekly round-up that brings you the latest developments and perspectives from guests like Dave Eggers, Adam Gopnik, Emily Bazelon and Dahlia Lithwick among other journalists, novelists, ethicists, essayists and podiatrists.*"Pardon Me" also airs on Connecticut Public Radio Saturdays at noon.Not to be confused with a podcast of a similar name, Colin may do occasional kettlebell workouts, but they won't be a big part of the show. And make sure you are not actually drinking from a fire hose, because that's very dangerous.*Only if Gordon Sondland develops specific foot ailments.

Most Recent Episodes

John Bolton's Head On A Pike

The New York Times reported Sunday night that former National Security Adviser John Bolton claims in the draft of his new book that President Trump told him in August that he wanted to withhold military aid from Ukraine unless Ukrainian officials helped with investigations into Democrats, including former Vice President Joe Biden and his son Hunter. Bolton went on to implicate Attorney General William Barr, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, and acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney in the cover-up. Also in this bonus episode: Colin on why the way Secretary of State Mike Pompeo treated Mary Louise Kelly, host of NPR's All Things Considered, is a big problem. GUEST: Bill Curry - Former White House counselor to Bill Clinton and a two-time Democratic nominee for governor of Connecticut Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

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The World's Greatest Deliberative Body Or A Bunch Of Bored White Guys Playing With Fidget Spinners?

Chief Justice John Roberts scolded House managers and the President's counsel early Wednesday for using language beneath the dignity of the world's "greatest deliberative body." This, after Senator Susan Collins complained about "unsettling comments" she felt went against Senate rules of decorum.

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Stephen Metcalf: Washing Up On The Shoals Of A Semi-Apocalypse

Slate's Stephen Metcalf thinks President Trump is a hostage to 1979. Why else would he overreact by killing Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani for inciting protesters to storm the U.S. Embassy in Iraq? In President Trump's mind, it was the right response. How else could he avoid the fate of Jimmy Carter, a once popular president deemed weak after failing to bring home 52 hostages captured during the Iranian Revolution? Why else would the President threaten 52 cultural sites, one for each of those captured hostages? This is Colin's full interview with Stephen Metcalf, lightly edited for sound but not content. You can hear a shortened version in Episode 7 of Pardon Me (Another Damn Impeachment Show?). GUEST: Stephen Metcalf - Host of the Slate Culture Gabfest; he's working on a book about the 1980s Thanks to Catie Talarski and Chion Wolf. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

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Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey: Ratification Or Rejection

Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey argue that President Trump has changed the function of the presidency from one of public service to one that serves his personal interests. The President was impeached for withholding aid to Ukraine in exchange for a political investigation into his political rival and obstructing the House investigation into his behavior. The President will likely be acquitted in the Senate. It may be up to voters in November to decide whether to ratify or reject Trump's vision of the presidency. Colin's interview with Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey has been lightly edited for sound but not for time or content. You can hear a significantly shorter version in Episode 7 of Pardon Me (Another Damn Impeachment Show?). GUESTS: Benjamin Wittes - Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, Editor-in-Chief of Lawfare, analyst for MSNBC, and the coauthor of Unmaking the Presidency: Donald Trump's War on the World's Most Powerful Office Susan Hennessey - Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institute, Executive editor at Lawfare, analyst for CNN, and the coauthor of Unmaking The Presidency: Donald Trump's War on the World's Most Powerful Office Thanks to Catie Talarski and Chion Wolf. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

The Senate Trial Begins, Or: Impeachment Apprentice

President Trump fretted this week that White House lawyer Pat Cippolone and personal lawyer Jay Sekulow lacked experience on television. So he added a few TV-ready lawyers to the mix, each with scripted roles to play. This week, Lawfare's Benjamin Wittes and Susan Hennessey argue that President Trump has changed the presidency from one of public service to one that serves his personal interests. Will we ratify his vision or reject it? It may be up to voters to decide. Also this hour: Slate's Stephen Metcalf thinks Trump is a hostage to 1979. Why else would he be obsessed with U.S. embassies and Jimmy Carter? And singer/songwriter Lara Herscovitch proves music is the antidote to our troubled times. GUESTS: Susan Hennessey - Senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, executive editor at Lawfare, analyst for CNN, and the co-author of Unmaking The Presidency: Donald Trump's War on the World's Most Powerful Office Lara Herscovitch - A singer, songwriter, and poet; former Connecticut state troubadour Stephen Metcalf - Host of the Slate Culture Gabfest; he's working on a book about the 1980s Benjamin Wittes - Senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, editor-in-chief of Lawfare, analyst for MSNBC, and the co-author of Unmaking The Presidency: Donald Trump's War on the World's Most Powerful Office Thanks to Catie Talarski and Chion Wolf. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

One Nation, Under Insomnia

Law professor Bruce Ackerman argues that President Trump's order to kill Iranian Major General Qassem Soleimani is a far graver offense than his efforts to pressure Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky to investigate Joe Biden. Think about it: He's bragging about his decision to kill a high-ranking official of another country. Will Chief Justice John Roberts save us? And that's the positive view on our show this week. Sarah Kendzior studies autocratic governments. She thinks we'd be foolish to believe there are limits to what the Trump administration would do — whether jailing witnesses and whistleblowers, threatening protesters, or using nuclear weapons. Also this hour: The third edition of Factoids with Chion Wolf and reporter Frankie Graziano talks to people at the Super Walmart Center in Manchester, Conn. GUESTS: Bruce Ackerman- The Sterling Professor of Law and Political Science at Yale and the author of nineteen books Frankie Graziano - Reporter at Connecticut Public Radio Sarah Kendzior - A writer, researcher, and co-host of the podcast Gaslit Nation Chion Wolf - Producer, photographer, and announcer at Connecticut Public Radio Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

Jim Jordan: The Vice Principal Who Haunts Your Nightmares

Professor Michael Gerhardt argues that the impeachment process is legitimate, despite efforts by President Trump and his defenders to deny it. It is the president's conduct that is not normal. Gerhardt was one of four law professors summoned by the House Judiciary Committee in December, to share their legal expertise on whether President Trump's conduct met the legal threshold for impeachment. Three out of four of them believe it did. Also this hour: State Department witness George Kent's bow tie and Rep. Jim Jordan's jacket have their own Twitter accounts. Nancy Pelosi's dagger-like gold pin turned heads on the day she opened up House debate on the president's impeachment. We talk about the fashion semiotics of impeachment. We also bring you more interesting factoids and an essay about the convergence of entertainment and impeachment. GUESTS: Vanessa Friedman - Fashion director and chief fashion critic for The New York Times Michael Gerhardt - The Burton Craige University Distinguished Professor of Jurisprudence at the University of North Carolina School of Law in Chapel Hill and the author of several books including Impeachment: What Everyone Needs To Know Bill Yousman - Professor of media studies at Sacred Heart University Chion Wolf - Producer, photographer, and announcer at Connecticut Public Radio Thanks to Eugene Amatruda. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

Peter Sokolowski: We're Living In A Crisis Of Meaning

Peter Sokolowski, lexicographer at Merriam-Webster, fears we're currently having a crisis of meaning in our cultural understanding and use of words. How do we understand phrases like "fake news?" Does it mean news that has no relationship to reality or is it how President Trump refers to truth-based news he doesn't like? What is an "alternative fact?" How can the phrase "drug deal" be used to refer to an illegal business transaction — or in its use by former National Security Advisor John Bolton, an illegal government transaction — and as a smear against the Navy's former top civilian leader, Richard Spencer, for trying to uphold professional standards? How can we communicate with one another if we don't agree on the basic meaning of words? This is our full interview with Sokolowski. It's about half again as long as the version that aired in Episode 4 of Pardon Me. It has been lightly edited for clarity but not for time or content. GUEST: Peter Sokolowski - A lexicographer and editor-at-large at Merriam-Webster; he's also a musician and public radio jazz host at NEPR, and he's the author of a chapter in The Whole World in a Book Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

God May Forgive You (But I Won't)

There's a good chance that President Trump knows that the stain of impeachment will be part of his legacy. And as damning details about the president's behavior trickle out, we're realizing how much we still don't know. This may explain why impeachment may be more popular than we realize. President Trump told CNN's Jake Tapper in 2016 that he had a "great relationship with God," and that he "doesn't do a lot of things that are bad." Yet, a basic Christian confession is that all of us have fallen short of the glory of God and are in need of God's forgiveness." How do Christians reconcile President Trump's lack of personal morality with their wide support for his presidency? We also bring you interesting factoids about impeachment and a deep dive into the words that are emerging from the process. GUESTS: David A. Graham - Staff writer at The Atlantic Jennifer A. Herdt - The Gilbert L. Stark Professor of Christian Ethics at Yale Divinity School Peter Sokolowski - A lexicographer and editor-at-large at Merriam-Webster Chion Wolf - Producer, photographer, and announcer at Connecticut Public Radio Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

Impeached! Or: 55 White Guys Day Drinking

There's actually some question whether President Trump has officially been impeached, it turns out. In any case, on Wednesday, December 18, the U.S. House of Representatives passed two Articles of Impeachment charging the president with abuse of power and obstruction of congress. On our third full episode, we talk to the founder of Politico about the huge difference a tiny bit of self-control would make to the Trump presidency and a Yale historian about what those crazy founders were thinking when they put impeachment in the Constitution in the first place. Plus: Our first AccuFrankie report from the Target parking lot in New Britain, Conn., and a song performed live in our studios by Nekita Waller, "Big Al" Anderson, Jim Chapdelaine, and The Shinolas. GUESTS: John Berry - A listener and former public school teacher Joanne Freeman - Professor of history and American studies at Yale and the cohost of the podcast BackStory Ross Garber - Teaches political investigations and impeachment law at Tulane Law School and is a CNN legal analyst; he has represented four governors in impeachment proceedings Frankie Graziano - A reporter for Connecticut Public Radio John Harris - Co-founder of Politico Thanks to Eugene Amatruda and Chion Wolf. Email us your questions at pardonme@ctpublic.org. Pardon Me is a production of The Colin McEnroe Show on Connecticut Public Radio. Support the show.

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