For The Wild An anthology of the Anthropocene; focused on land based protection, co-liberation and intersectional storytelling rooted in a paradigm shift from human supremacy towards deep ecology.
For The Wild

For The Wild

From KRCB-FM

An anthology of the Anthropocene; focused on land based protection, co-liberation and intersectional storytelling rooted in a paradigm shift from human supremacy towards deep ecology.

Most Recent Episodes

TOM BUTLER on the Complexities of Large-Scale Conservation /218

Currently, less than 15% of terrestrial land exists in some form of protected area, the percentage of marine protected areas is significantly lower. It's undeniable that protecting some of the last vestiges of wild places from industrial decimation is a critical and worthy cause. However, large-scale land conservation projects have also historically displaced many populations and distressed communities that have relied upon pasture and forest for their livelihoods because of previous colonial impositions. In this episode, we explore the complex world of large-scale land conservation and wildlife restoration with guest Tom Butler. A writer and conservation activist, Tom Butler is author, volume editor, or co-editor of more than a dozen books including Wildlands Philanthropy, Plundering Appalachia, and Overdevelopment, Overpopulation, Overshoot, and ENERGY: Overdevelopment and the Delusion of Endless Growth. Music by Jeffrey Silverstein and Galen Hefferman. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

CAROL RUCKDESCHEL on Keeping Cumberland Island Wild / 217

Cumberland Island is one of Georgia's most biologically diverse barrier islands, with its maritime forests, coastal beaches, and salt marshes providing a habitat for many endangered kin, in addition to being a resting point along the transatlantic migratory flyway. This wild place has been fervently loved and protected over the past couple of decades by biologist, naturalist, environmental activist, and full-time resident of the island, Carol Ruckdeschel. This week on the program we speak to Carol about the importance of places like Cumberland Island, some of the most pressing threats Cumberland currently faces, and the dangerous precedent that will be set if we continue to allow private-interest to chip away and fragment the very little bit of wilderness that is currently protected. Music by Eliza Edens, Kesia Nagata, Lauren Alegre, and I Goodfriend. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

OLÚFẸ́MI O. TÁÍWÒ on Climate Colonialism and Reparations / 216

After the 15th century, only five countries in the world had not been colonized by European empires in some form or another. Today we see how the policies, strategies, and technologies intended to "address" climate change will ultimately echo colonial pursuits under the guise of sustainable development and carbon offsets. This week, we explore climate colonialism, reparations, carbon removal, and a real "just transition" with guest Olufemi O. Taiwo. Our conversation doesn't provide easy answers or solutions but rather reminds us that while climate colonialism is unfurling before us, there is a myriad of tangible ways countries and movements across the so-called global North could begin making reparations. Olufemi O. Taiwo is Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Georgetown University. He studies and teaches social and political philosophy, with an emphasis on the Black radical tradition and anti-colonial thought. Music by 40 Million Feet, Ulali, and Rajna Swaminathan. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

NALINI NADKARNI on Discovering Forest Canopy Microcosms [ENCORE] /215

Called "the queen of canopy research," Nalini Nadkarni explores the rich, vital world found in the tops of trees. Dr. Nadkarni has spent two decades climbing the trees of Costa Rica, Papua New Guinea, the Amazon and the Pacific Northwest, exploring the world of animals and plants that live in the canopy and never come down; and how this upper layer of the forest interacts with the world on the ground. In this episode of For The Wild, initially aired in December of 2017, we journey into the canopies with Nalini to learn about the spectacular biota of the canopy. Music by Emma Tricca, Bert Jansch, and Michael Ching. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references and action points.

SEVERINE VON TSCHARNER FLEMING on the Commons to Which We Belong /214

This week on the podcast we explore what land redistribution could look like and how land can be emancipated from the commodity structure with guest Severine von Tscharner Fleming. How do we navigate the settler desire to own land? How can our understanding of the commons invite us into collective commitment to caring for the land and staving of speculative land privatization? In response to these questions, Severine shares the messiness and opportunity of living amongst the prosperity of extraction in the spaces we inhabit while dedicating ourselves to a land-based livelihood that awakens the call to live inside of accountability to people and place. Severine is a farmer, activist, and organizer based in Downeast Maine. She runs Smithereen Farm, a MOFGA certified organic wild blueberry, seaweed, and orchard operation which hosts summer camps, camping, and educational workshops. She is a founder and board member of Agrarian Trust and current director of the Greenhorns, a 13 year old grassroots organization whose mission is to recruit, promote, and support the incoming generation of farmers in America. Music by Handmade Moments. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references, and action points.

CAMILLE DEFRENNE on Forest Symbiosis /213

Globally, our forests support almost two-thirds of Earth's terrestrial species, they are cooperative and resilient systems where connections and relationships are inseparable. However, this interdependence also creates serious vulnerabilities when forests are subjected to land and habitat degradation, industrialized forestry practices, short-sighted restoration projects, and a changing climate. In this episode, we talk about disturbances to forest ecosystems, the role of mycorrhizal networks, and the unbelievable importance of peatlands with guest Camille Defrenne. Camille spent four years during her Ph.D. studying Douglas-fir trees alongside Dr. Suzanne Simard. Camille found Douglas-fir trees rely as much on their roots and fungi as they do on their needles to adapt to the climate. Since then, Camille crossed the border and invaded the peatlands of Minnesota, a type of wetlands which are the world's largest natural terrestrial carbon store. Supported by Dr. Colleen Iversen, she is now a postdoctoral research associate spying on roots and their fungal friends in one of the world's largest peatland warming experiments. Music by Harrison Foster, If By Whiskey, and Ali Dineen. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references and action points.

Dr. VANDANA SHIVA on Becoming Untameable /212

This past year has forced many of us to transfer our practices into the digital realm, and while this has been done for the safety of our communities, billionaires and tech giants have no desire to see us sever ourselves from the perceived convenience technology provides us. So we must ask ourselves, to what extent does our quality of life become reduced when we relinquish our sovereignty for the sake of convenience? How does our reliance on technology diminish our collective skillset? Our relationship with Earth? Our ways of thinking? In this week's episode, Dr. Vandana Shiva joins us to discuss how we are being set up to become accessories to the digital world and how we can reclaim our intellectual freedom and sovereignty from the hands of digital dictatorship. Vandana provides us with compelling examples of Monsanto's targeted erasure of Traditional Ecological Knowledge and simultaneous acquisition of the world's largest data corporations, and the correlation between philanthrocapitalism and the World Intellectual Property Organization. Dr. Vandana Shiva is a leader in the International Forum on Globalisation and of the Slow Food Movement, the current Director of Navdanya and of the Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Ecology. Her latest book is Oneness vs the 1%: Shattering Illusions, Seeding Future. Music by John Newton, Lady Moon and The Eclipse, and Dzidzor. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references and action points.

HARSHA WALIA on Dismantling Imagined, Militarized, and Colonial Borders / 211

Migration has always existed, but in terms of human migration and climate change, we are poised to experience one of the greatest occurrences of global migration humanity has ever known. The number of migrants is now growing faster than our world's population, and with this growth, we've seen the tremendous human rights violations and acts of depravity enforced by agents of the State across all global borderlands. This has caused many to call for serious inquiry and reform when it comes to national border guard agencies, but doing so fails to recognize that the border itself is inherently violent. In this episode of For The Wild, we talk with guest Harsha Walia on why it is imperative to rid the concept of legal/illegal personhood in movements for the climate and environment. Harsha Walia a South Asian activist, writer, and popular educator rooted in migrant justice and Indigenous solidarity. She is the award-winning author of Undoing Border Imperialism and is currently the Executive Director of British Columbia's Civil Liberties Association. Music by John Newton, Troll Dolly, and Harrison Basch. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references and action points.

HARSHA WALIA on Dismantling Imagined, Militarized, and Colonial Borders / 211

Dr. SAMUEL RAMSEY on Bee Population in Peril /210

In the mid-2000s, estimates in the United States suggested that we were losing up to 40% of honeybee colonies. The phenomenon of Colony Collapse Disorder was widely covered in the media as the next emerging threat, but then it all but disappeared. Beyond these headlines, we never heard much follow up as to how bee populations were faring. This week we return to the bees with entomologist Dr. Samuel Ramsey. Highlighting the intertwining issues of poor nutrition, pesticides, and parasites, Dr. Ramsey also shares how climate change impacts the nutritional quality of pollen and how human design and development has strengthened and spread parasitic mites to the disadvantage of bees globally. Samuel Ramsey earned his doctorate from Dr. Dennis vanEngelsdorp's lab at the University of Maryland; Dr. Ramsey maintains a focus on how insect research can benefit the public through the development of IPM strategies and STEM-based outreach initiatives. Music featured in this episode is "Beanstalk" by Jeff Parker, "Natural Harmony" by The Mysterious They, and "Saka" by Gabriella di Capua. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references and action points.

SII-AM HAMILTON on Respect-Based Futures /209

In this powerful conversation with land defender Sii-am Hamilton, we are invited to discuss futuristic ways forward in recognition that Indigenous communities have been practicing creative resistance against colonialism and capitalism for hundreds of years. We begin by discussing what is currently transpiring on Wet'suwet'en territories and how colonial governments are using the current pandemic (and will use future crises) to roll back regulatory measures and push development full force. Sii-am offers a holistic reflection on frontline land defense and the extent to which violence is afflicted upon land defenders, and resource extraction participants, by transnational corporations, while also reorienting us to the reality that just, dignified, and brilliant futures already exist but are not given attention, curiosity, or love because they do not serve corporate profit. Sii-am Hamilton is a land defender and traditional knowledge holder born in occupied Hupacasath territory to mother Kwitsel Tatel and father Ron Hamilton. Their experience stems from time on the land, feast culture, and living traditional law and protocol. They are a qualified hand poke tattoo artist as well as a song holder. Sii-am has been raised in political organization, land title, and grassroots activism since childhood, and now specializes in publicity/media promotion of environmental and land sovereignty movements. Music by Elisapie. Visit our website at forthewild.world for the full episode description, references and action points.

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