Disrupted Most of us entered 2020 assuming that the decennial Census, an impeachment trial, and the Presidential election would be the key defining political moments of the year. Six months in, however, and the global COVID-19 pandemic and uprisings over police violence have captured the public square in a way no one could have predicted.
Disrupted

Disrupted

From Connecticut Public Radio

Most of us entered 2020 assuming that the decennial Census, an impeachment trial, and the Presidential election would be the key defining political moments of the year. Six months in, however, and the global COVID-19 pandemic and uprisings over police violence have captured the public square in a way no one could have predicted.

Most Recent Episodes

Understanding the impact of Nazi racism and American Jim Crow laws

Program Advisory: clips used in this episode contain antisemitic language used for the purpose of providing context. This week, we discuss antisemitism today, how we teach the history of the holocaust and Nazi racism's connection to American Jim Crow laws. We also hear about the Fortunoff Video Archive For Holocaust Testimonies. This conversation was part of a panel moderated by host Khalilah Brown Dean that followed a screening of The U.S. and the Holocaust, a documentary miniseries directed by Ken Burns, Lynn Novick, and Sarah Botstein. Classroom-ready materials and teaching resources created collaboratively with teachers, scholars and the Fortunoff Video Archive For Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University can be found here. GUESTS: Christina Chavarria: Program Coordinator for the William Levine Family Institute for Holocaust Education at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum Jeffrey A. Fletcher: Executive Director of The Ruby and Calvin Fletcher African American History Museum in Stratford, CT. He recently completed a 20-year career as a police officer in New Haven. Aya Marczyk: Curriculum Development Fellow at the Fortunoff Video Archive For Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University Disrupted is produced by Kevin Chang Barnum, Emily Charash and Catie Talarski. Our interns are Taylor Doyle and Jacob Gannon. Special thanks to Dylan Reyes, Deidre Tavera, Maureen Connelly and the event co-sponsors Connecticut Public, Voices of Hope, The Ruby and Calvin Fletcher African American Collection, Stratford and The Sterling House Community Center, Stratford. Additional thanks to the Fortunoff Video Archive For Holocaust Testimonies at Yale University Library. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Theologian Candice Marie Benbow on creating her own relationship with God

Organized religion plays an important role in many Americans' lives. But the Christian church isn't always a welcoming place. This week, one woman's journey of connecting with God in and outside the confines of organized religion. And how she's on a mission to make faith more accessible to everyone. GUESTS: Candice Marie Benbow: Theologian, Essayist, Columnist, and Educator. She is the author of the new book Red Lip Theology: For Church Girls Who've Considered Tithing to the Beauty Supply Store When Sunday Morning Isn't Enough This episode was produced by James Szkobel-Wolf, Zshekinah Collier, and Catie Talarski and originally aired on June 1, 2022. Disrupted is produced by Kevin Chang-Barnum, Emily Charash and Catie Talarski. Our interns are Taylor Doyle and Jacob Gannon. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Theologian Candice Marie Benbow on creating her own relationship with God

Failed innovations and their impact on our world today

History is littered with promising innovations that failed to live up to their hype. This week on Disrupted, a look at three revolutionary but doomed disruptions and their legacy on our world today. What became of the made-up language Esperanto, the music streaming platform Napster, and the once-popular treatment for mental illness, the lobotomy? GUESTS: Andrew Scull: Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Science Studies at the University of California, San Diego. He is the author of the upcoming book, Desperate Remedies: Psychiatry's Turbulent Quest to Cure Mental Illness Arika Okrent: Linguist and author of the book In the Land of Invented Languages: Adventures in Linguistic Creativity, Madness, and Genius Joseph Menn: Technology reporter at the Washington Post and author of All the Rave: The Rise and Fall of Shawn Fanning's Napster See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The historical forces impacting wrongful convictions, as witnessed in New Haven

This hour, we talk with Pulitzer Prize nominee Nicholas Dawidoff. His latest book, The Other Side of Prospect: A Story of Violence, Injustice and The American City, examines a wrongful conviction in New Haven, and what that case says about inequality around the country.And we talk to journalist and filmmaker Soledad O'Brien about the importance of diversifying newsrooms, and about her new documentary on Rosa Parks. Soledad O'Brien will be moderating a Connecticut Forum conversation with U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor on November 17th. GUESTS: Nicholas Dawidoff: author of five books, including The Other Side of Prospect: A Story of Violence, Injustice, and The American City Soledad O'Brien: journalist, CEO of Soledad O'Brien Productions See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The historical forces impacting wrongful convictions, as witnessed in New Haven

Understanding gender roles and bias in early childhood development

According to Professor of Developmental Psychology Christia Spears Brown, focusing on gender labels for children has a major impact on how those children view the world. This hour on Disrupted, we explore how kids experience gender and stereotypes, and including how parents impart biases on their children, and what we can do about it. We also hear from a professor of English who breaks down the language we use around gender and about her story growing up as a queer child in Bloomfield, Connecticut.GUESTS: Christia Spears Brown: Professor of Developmental Psychology and Associate Dean of Inclusive Excellence at the University of Kentucky, author of Unraveling Bias: How Prejudice Has Shaped Children for Generations and Why It's Time to Break the Cycle Kathryn Bond Stockton: Dean of the school for cultural and social transformation and distinguished Professor of English at the University of Utah. Her books include The Queer Child, and, most recently, Gender(s) See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Can the pandemic help employers understand the needs of today's workforce?

The American working world has been flipped upside down. Since 2020, many employees have adapted to working from home, managing hybrid schedules and countless remote meetings. But as we look to a future with, hopefully, fewer pandemic disruptions, what temporary work practices will become permanent? And what can we expect for the future of work? We'll also hear how the pandemic influenced the organized labor movement. And urbanist Richard Florida weighs in on how cities are transforming thanks to a decentralized workforce. What's the future of urban centers when more people are working from home? GUESTS: Emma Goldberg: Future of Work Reporter for the New York Times Sarita Gupta: Vice President of US Programs at the Ford Foundation, and Co-Author of The Future We Need: Organizing for a Better Democracy in the Twenty-First Century Erica Smiley: Executive Director of Jobs with Justice and Co-Author of The Future We Need: Organizing for a Better Democracy in the Twenty-First Century Richard Florida: Urbanist, professor at the University of Toronto, and author of The New Urban Crisis This episode of Disrupted was produced by James Szkobel-Wolff, Zshekinah Collier and Catie Talarski, with help from interns Michayla Savitt and Sara Gasparotto, who also contributed. This show originally aired on March 30, 2022. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Can the pandemic help employers understand the needs of today's workforce?

The forgotten and the powerful: A look at First Ladies and their influence

The First Lady of the United States is not an elected position. But even so, the office plays an important role in our government. This week on Disrupted, an Art Historian talks about the powerful First Ladies of American history who don't get the recognition they deserve. Also, how gender quotas are changing politics in Latin America. GUESTS: Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw: Class of 1940 Bicentennial Term Associate Professor of Art History at the University of Pennsylvania. Previously, she was the Senior Historian and Director of History, Research, and Scholarly Programs at the National Portrait Gallery Jennifer Piscopo: Associate Professor of Politics and Affiliate Faculty of Latin American and Latino/Latina Studies at Occidental College Click here to see more images from the First Lady Exhibition. J. Carlisle Larsen and Kevin Chang Barnum also contributed to producing this show, originally published on July 27, 2022. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The forgotten and the powerful: A look at First Ladies and their influence

Navigating politics at school and at home during 'dangerously divided times'

This hour on Disrupted, we explore how to communicate across the political divide. Mónica Guzmán joins us, author of 'I never thought of it that way: how to have fearlessly curious conversations in dangerously divided times' — and we hear about a controversial vocabulary worksheet at a Connecticut high school. Guests: Mónica Guzmán: Senior Fellow for Public Practice at Braver Angels, author of I Never Thought Of It That Way: How To Have Fearlessly Curious Conversations in Dangerously Divided Times Catherine Shen: Education reporter at Connecticut Public See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Navigating politics at school and at home during 'dangerously divided times'

New Haven judge Constance Baker Motley is a civil rights icon

Civil rights icons like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and Justice Thurgood Marshall have become household names. But the historic work of New Haven native Constance Baker Motley is still unknown to many Americans. This week, a look into the life and legacy of the first Black woman appointed to a federal court in American history. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Community and collaboration through art with NXTHVN and poet Antoinette Brim-Bell

Today on Disrupted, how artists in Connecticut are using their talents to empower their communities. Titus Kaphar and Jason Price co-founded NXTHVN, a nonprofit that brings artists from around the world to New Haven. They'll talk about how that organization is empowering young people. And, Connecticut's 8th State Poet Laureate Antoinette Brim-Bell talks about the collaborations that are fueling her art. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Community and collaboration through art with NXTHVN and poet Antoinette Brim-Bell