Louisiana Considered "Louisiana Considered" showcases South Louisiana's biggest stories and features interviews with journalists, newsmakers, and artists. The show is a collaboration between the WWNO and WRKF newsrooms. Airs Monday through Friday at noon.
Louisiana Considered

Louisiana Considered

From WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

"Louisiana Considered" showcases South Louisiana's biggest stories and features interviews with journalists, newsmakers, and artists. The show is a collaboration between the WWNO and WRKF newsrooms. Airs Monday through Friday at noon.

Most Recent Episodes

Slidell clears debris from tornado damage; Jazz Fest cooks serve up crawfish dishes

Two tornadoes touched down in the city of Slidell, north of New Orleans, earlier this month. The severe weather damaged hundreds of buildings in the area. Thankfully, nobody was killed. But recovery efforts are expected to be ongoing for the next several months. Gov. Jeff Landry issued an emergency declaration after visiting the area last week. Greg Cromer, Slidel's mayor, joins the show to share more on the city's ongoing recovery efforts. Louisiana loses teachers every year. Some go to neighboring states. While others leave teaching completely. And a big part of the problem is pay. Teachers in Louisiana make about $13,000 less a year than the national average. And regionally, they still make several thousand dollars less. All week, we're hearing from public school teachers. Aubri Juhasz, WWNO/WRKF education reporter, interviewed several teachers about the difficult decisions they're faced with, including whether to stay in the classroom. The 2024 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, also known as Jazz Fest, kicks off this week. The Rolling Stones tops the list of headliners. And foodies will get some satisfaction too. Several vendors are offering a wide array of dishes featuring crawfish. We caught up with two of them Sonya DiCarlo of Clesi's Seafood Restaurant & Catering and John Caluda of Caluda's King Cakes Cottage Catering. ___ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Diane Mack. Our managing producer is Alana Schrieber. Matt Bloom and Aubry Procell are assistant producers. Our engineer is Garrett Pittman. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12 and 7 p.m. It's available on Spotify, Google Play and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Slidell clears debris from tornado damage; Jazz Fest cooks serve up crawfish dishes

Families scramble to fill summer food assistance gap; NOLA artist documents changing coastline

There's a lot of uncertainty around whether a popular food assistance program will serve Louisiana families this summer. Gov. Jeff Landry rejected $71 million in federal aid earlier this year to help feed children when schools are closed. Khalil Gillon, a reporter at Verite News, has been covering the fallout from Landry's decision to decline federal funding and shares the latest. The Gulf South is getting hundreds of millions of dollars from settlements with some of the nation's largest opioid manufacturers and distributors. It's part of a plan to help mitigate damage caused by the opioid crisis. And some are calling for more of the funds to be used for harm reduction to help people and their families. The Gulf States Newsroom's Drew Hawkins recently sat down with Maia Szalavitz, author of Undoing Drugs: The Untold Story of Harm Reduction and the Future of Addiction. Land loss is an issue that most Louisianans are familiar with. But how often do you take stock of exactly what's changed? Virginia Hanusik is an artist who has dedicated her career to capturing the changing coastline. Her photography explores the relationship between landscape, culture and human-built infrastructure. She joins us to discuss her new book, Into the Quiet and the Light: Water, Life, and Land Loss in South Louisiana. ___ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Karen Henderson. Our managing producer is Alana Schrieber. Matt Bloom and Aubry Procell are assistant producers. Our engineer is Garrett Pittman. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12 and 7 p.m. It's available on Spotify, Google Play and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Families scramble to fill summer food assistance gap; NOLA artist documents changing coastline

How Germany pumps billions into Louisiana's LNG plant expansion

Today, we bring you the conclusion of part two of Sea Change's special series All Gassed Up. Hosts Carlyle Calhoun and Halle Parker head to Germany, one of the world's leaders in green energy. But they discover the country is also playing a huge role in the expansion of Liquefied Natural Gas on the Gulf Coast. ___ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Ryan Vasquez. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber; our contributing producers are Matt Bloom and Adam Vos; we receive production and technical support from Garrett Pittman and our assistant producer, Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:00 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Where the effort to rewrite Louisiana's constitution stands; Intimate partner violence cos...

It's Thursday, and that means it's time to catch up on politics with Stephanie Grace, The Times-Picayune/The Advocate's editorial director and columnist. We'll get the latest on efforts to hold a constitutional convention in Baton Rouge this summer. Plus, a new leader takes top role in the state's Democratic Party. A former New Orleans police chief is calling on President Biden to support changing how marijuana is classified in the United States. Ronal Serpas is one of 32 law-enforcement leaders who signed a letter to the president in support of moving marijuana to a less serious category of controlled substance law. The Gulf States Newsroom's Kat Stromquist spoke to the former head of the NOPD about what it would mean for criminal justice. Over 50% of Louisiana's adults have experienced some form of intimate partner violence–including knife attacks, choking, or other physical threats. Louisiana women are three times more likely than men to experience severe or fatal forms of IPV. A new report puts a price tag on the costs of intimate partner violence to everyone in Louisiana; and the economic cost is surprising. Anita Raj, Executive Director of the Newcomb Institute at Tulane University, joins the show to share more. __ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Diane Mack. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber; our contributing producers are Matt Bloom and Adam Vos; we receive production and technical support from Garrett Pittman and our assistant producer, Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:00 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Where the effort to rewrite Louisiana's constitution stands; Intimate partner violence cos...

5th Circuit sees uptick in voting rights cases; LSU gets $160 million grant to study clean energy

The 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, based in New Orleans, is widely seen as the most conservative federal appeals court in the nation. It handles cases from Texas, Mississippi and Louisiana. As voting rights legislation meanders through the courts, the 5th Circuit has had a lot to say about the constitutionality of voting rights law. Madeleine Greenberg is a senior case coordinator with Democracy Docket, a progressive-leaning platform examining voting rights and elections in the courts; she wrote an article examining a rise in voting rights cases before the 5th Circuit and joins us for more. Your local government is only as open and accessible as its digital presence — at least that's the way things seem to work in the 21st century. The city-parish of Baton Rouge has been recognized for its digital government accessibility. The Bloomberg Center for Government Excellence recognized the MyBR app for giving people access to an open government. The recognition came as part of Bloomberg's Sunshine Week, an initiative promoting open government and transparency. Mayor-President Sharon Weston Broome joins the show to tell us about how citizens can use the MyBR app to interact with their government. LSU recently got a major boost to its efforts to research clean energy production in the state. The school won $160 million dollars through a grant from the National Science Foundation. The money will go towards new sustainability research and job training for students over the coming decade. Halle Parker, Coastal Desk reporter, spoke with Dr. Robert Twilley, LSU's Vice President of research and economic development, about the historically large grant and what it means for the state. ____ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Adam Vos. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber; our contributing producers are Matt Bloom and Adam Vos; we receive production and technical support from Garrett Pittman and our assistant producer, Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:00 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

5th Circuit sees uptick in voting rights cases; LSU gets $160 million grant to study clean energy

Sanctuary city ban bill moves through legislature; tribute honors Alvin Batiste, Edward 'K...

Sanctuary cities have become targets of Republican lawmakers across the country. Now Louisiana's legislature is considering a measure that would ban parishes and cities from adopting their own policies. Bobbi-Jeanne Misick, reporter at Verite News, has been tracking the proposal since it was introduced and joins us for more. Edward "Kidd" Jordan, NOLA jazz saxophonist, and Alvin Batiste, jazz clarinetist, are being remembered in a special tribute concert on April 20 at the University of New Orleans Performance Recital Hall. Stephanie Jordan, vocalist, and Rachel Jordan, violinist, join Louisiana Considered to discuss the legacy of their late father and uncle. The Musaica Chamber Ensemble closes its 18th season, "Heart and Soul,"with a piano quintet and a world premiere quartet for oboe and strings. Bruce Owen, Musaica violist and president, joins the show with the details. The Musaica Chamber Ensemble performs its final concert of the season on Monday, April 22 at 7:30 p.m. at the UNO Performing Arts Center Recital Hall. ____ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Diane Mack. Our managing producer is Alana Schrieber. Matt Bloom and Aubry Procell are assistant producers. Our engineer is Garrett Pittman. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12 and 7 p.m. It's available on Spotify, Google Play and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Sanctuary city ban bill moves through legislature; tribute honors Alvin Batiste, Edward 'K...

1 in 5 Baton Rouge students is chronically absent; exhibit pairs quilting and planets

Students in the Baton Rouge area are missing school — and a lot of it. More than 50,000 students across the area's school districts had more than five unexcused absences last school year. That's according to the latest research from the Baton Rouge Area Chamber, which analyzed local attendance rates. Jake Polansky, the chamber's manager of economic and policy research, joins the show to share takeaways and potential solutions. A new report from the Louisiana Department of Health shows Black women who are pregnant continue to die at much higher rates than white pregnant women in the state. The report covers maternal deaths in 2020. It found Black women were 2.5 times more likely to die than their white counterparts. Rosemary Westwood, WWNO/WRKF reproductive health reporter, spoke with Dr. Veronica Gillispie- Bell, who led the research. The LSU Museum of Art will host a unique exhibition of quilts inspired by planetary science. The fiber artwork exhibition, "Fierce Planets: Word from the Studio Art Quilt Associates," draws from the research of renowned planetary physicist Dr. Sabine Stanley and her book "What's Hidden Inside Planets." The exhibition is curated by Michelle Schulte. We hear from both of them. See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

1 in 5 Baton Rouge students is chronically absent; exhibit pairs quilting and planets

Why La. is exporting record amounts of LNG to Europe; crawfish prices remain historically high

Today we bring you the first part of "All Gassed Up, Part 2: The German Connection," from Sea Change. Why is the U.S. exporting liquefied natural gas to Europe? Hosts Halle Parker and Carlyle Calhoun head to Germany to find out and learn what that means for the future of our climate. This crawfish season has been a rough one. Farmers and fishermen are catching a tiny percentage of what they normally would, while consumers are paying high prices. WWNO and WRKF reporter Eva Tesfaye and Maya Miller, of the Gulf States Newsroom, talked to crawfish farmers and fisherman about how they're navigating one of the worst seasons they've ever seen ___ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Ryan Vasquez. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber; our contributing producers are Matt Bloom and Adam Vos; we receive production and technical support from Garrett Pittman and our assistant producer, Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:00 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Why La. is exporting record amounts of LNG to Europe; crawfish prices remain historically high

How southern schools fared in NCAA March Madness; Subsistence agriculture thrives along th...

The University of Connecticut took home the NCAA Division 1 men's basketball tournament this week. South Carolina won the women's championship. This year, twelve teams from the Gulf South made it to the so-called Big Dance, including the Grambling State men's team and LSU's women's team. Smaller schools in the region were eliminated right away, but getting a shot at the championship can still make a huge difference beyond the basketball court. Joseph King, reporter with the Gulf States Newsroom, explains why. Festival season is upon New Orleans. That means music, food and lots of tourists. Last year, the city saw over 17.5 million visitors and the city projects tourism numbers this year to continue their steady recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. What made New Orleans' economy so tourist-heavy in the first place? Laine Kaplan-Levenson, host of the podcast TriPod, took a look at that question back in 2016. We listen back to the episode today. With today's global supply chain, subsistence agriculture might seem like a thing of the past. That's not entirely the case, according to Helen Regis, a cultural anthropologist at LSU and author of Bayou Harvest: Subsistence Practice in Coastal Louisiana. Regis has spent years observing farming and food preparation along the Gulf Coast, where she's gained insights into hunting, fishing, gardening, and more. ____ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Adam Vos. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber; our contributing producers are Matt Bloom and Adam Vos; we receive production and technical support from Garrett Pittman and our assistant producer, Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:00 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How southern schools fared in NCAA March Madness; Subsistence agriculture thrives along th...

Lawmakers debate rollback of '3-year' insurance rule; Bill would block some La. power line...

It's Thursday, and that means it's time to catch up on politics with Stephanie Grace, The Times-Picayune/The Advocate's editorial director and columnist. This week, we cover lawmakers' efforts to reform home insurance industry regulations. One big proposal would eliminate the 3-year rule, a Katrina era law that stops insurance companies generally from raising deductibles or not renewing homeowner policies that have been in effect for more than 3 years. It's part of the "free market" changes Tim Temple, Louisiana Insurance Commissioner, wants to make to stabilize the state's underwriting environment and make it more hospitable for companies to do business. Dr. Walter Lane, chair of economics and finance at the University of New Orleans, joins the show to discuss the implications. Senate Bill 108 would make it difficult for an entity from outside Louisiana to use land for a proposed transmission line that would move electrical power across Louisiana unless it dropped what it calls "a majority" of the electricity or steam power in Louisiana. It would also block similar future projects in the state. What is Louisiana's energy landscape and who controls it? Why would the legislature be trying to stop an energy project that could deliver cheaper energy to the state? Logan Atkinson Burke, executive director of the Alliance for Affordable Energy, joins the show to answer those questions. ___ Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by [host]. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber; our contributing producers are Matt Bloom and Adam Vos; we receive production and technical support from Garrett Pittman and our assistant producer, Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:00 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Lawmakers debate rollback of '3-year' insurance rule; Bill would block some La. power line...