Louisiana Considered "Louisiana Considered" showcases South Louisiana's biggest stories and features interviews with journalists, newsmakers, and artists. The show is a collaboration between the WWNO and WRKF newsrooms. Airs Monday through Friday at noon.
Louisiana Considered

Louisiana Considered

From WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

"Louisiana Considered" showcases South Louisiana's biggest stories and features interviews with journalists, newsmakers, and artists. The show is a collaboration between the WWNO and WRKF newsrooms. Airs Monday through Friday at noon.

Most Recent Episodes

'We are resilient people': A project to keep cultures and land above water

Now through February 24 at the Cary Saurage Community Arts Center in Baton Rouge is "Preserving Our Place– A Photographic Exhibition." This display offers visual art from native communities in coastal south Louisiana and coastal far-west Alaska, attesting to the similarities in the climate crises in the artists' native homes. For more, WRKF's Adam Vos spoke with the artists Chantel Comardelle, tribal executive secretary of the Jean Charles Choctaw Nation and co-creator of the exhibit, and Dennis Davis, community artist of the native Inupiaq village of Shishmaref, Alaska. In 2020, Mardi Gras was the launching point for a surge in COVID-19 cases throughout the Gulf South. And this year – there's more in the air, like flu and RSV. Gulf States Newsroom reporter Shalina Chatlani spoke with health officials about what to expect this year and how to stay safe. But first, it's Friday and that means it's time for an update on this week in politics. The Times-Picayune | The Advocate's Editorial Director and columnist Stephanie Grace tells us how Mayor Cantrell is grappling with the challenges of crime, infrastructure, and a recall attempt, and whether or not she can regain the city's trust. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Patrick Madden. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman and Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

'We are resilient people': A project to keep cultures and land above water

New SPLC report reveals major lack of diversity in Louisiana law enforcement

A recent study by the Southern Poverty Law Center Action Fund revealed that Louisiana sheriffs and prosecutors are overwhelmingly white and male. While over 33% of Louisiana's population is Black only 6% of the sheriffs and 12% of the district attorneys are Black, which points to a significant disparity. Here to tell us more about these findings is Delvin Davis, author of the study, "Out of Balance, Racial Disparity Among Louisiana's Sheriffs and Prosecutors." Some of the most anticipated Mardi Gras krewes are getting ready to roll this weekend. Greg Swanson tells us about Krewe de Vieux's scandalous parade kicking off this Saturday, and a voice of mystery shares insight into Krewe Delusion's Sunday debut! But first, Louisiana lawmakers met at the statehouse this week for a special session on insurance. WRKF's Capital Access Reporter Paul Braun has the details. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Karl Lengel. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman, Aubry Procell, and Thomas Walsh. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

New SPLC report reveals major lack of diversity in Louisiana law enforcement

LSU launches new modeling system to better predict flooding after hurricanes

Last week, two Baton Rouge area elementary school teachers were recognized with the Milken Educator Award, a nationwide honor sometimes described as "the Oscars of Teaching." Today, the two teachers, Dereka Duncan and Elise Frederic, tell us more about this accomplishment. When a hurricane strikes, it's not just the immediate wind and rain damage that causes concern. Many are also forced to grapple with flooding, and often, as in the case of Hurricane Katrina, the water rises and stays for days at a time. Now, the LSU Department of Oceanography and Coastal Science and the Center for Computation and Technology are working to better predict flooding after hurricanes with a new computer modeling system. Associate professor George Xue tells us how this modeling will help communities prepare for disasters. With carnival season underway we are going back to the archives to hear some of our favorite Mardi Gras stories from years past. Today, in collaboration between WWNO's Thomas Walsh and StoryCorps, we bring you a 2015 conversation between two Mardi Gras Indians, Littdell "Queen B" Bannister and Mary Jones, who discuss sewing personal pride into each stitch of their costumes. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Adam Vos. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman, Aubry Procell, and Thomas Walsh. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

LSU launches new modeling system to better predict flooding after hurricanes

The musical "The Color Purple," based on the book by Alice Walker, extends run at Le Petit Theatre

Le Petit Theatre's production of The Color Purple, the musical based on Alice Walker's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, has been extended through February 5th. It tells the story of Celie, an African American woman and her journey toward empowerment and self-love in the American South. Baton Rouge actress Taylor James, who stars as Celie, joins us for more. The Musaica Chamber Ensemble continues its 17th season entitled "A Musical Family" with Next Door Neighbors. The adventuresome group will take audiences to distant lands featuring the works of composers from bordering countries. We learn more from Musaica violist and president Bruce Owen. But first, it's carnival season! And we are going back to the archives to hear some of our best stories on different krewes, parades, and traditions. Today we are bringing you a 2021 episode of American Routes Shortcuts, where Nick Spitzer reports on the Northside Skull and Bone Gang that takes to the streets early Mardi Gras morning. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Diane Mack. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman and Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The musical "The Color Purple," based on the book by Alice Walker, extends run at Le Petit Theatre

When neo-Nazis came to New Orleans, a group of Holocaust survivors fought back

Last Friday was Holocaust Remembrance Day. And even though these days, the term "never forget" seems to be part of public discourse, it wasn't that long ago that discussions of the Holocaust were often repressed or even discouraged. But in 1961, many survivors were caught in the crosshairs when a neo-Nazi "hate-bus" came to New Orleans. This led to a confrontation between survivors and neo-Nazis, in an event that was emblematic of increasing support for civil rights among Jews. Lawrence Powell wrote about this event in his book, Troubled Memory; Anne Levy, the Holocaust and David Duke's Louisiana. The Professor Emeritus of History at Tulane University joins us for more on this chapter in history. Today we are bringing you our 5th episode of Liner Notes, our segment that highlights local Louisiana musicians as they walk us through their songwriting and composition process. Baton Rouge artist Dalton Hamilton, also known as BandG33k, tells us about his song "Alone!" that he wrote, performed, and engineered for his album, BLVKMOTH. This episode of Liner Notes was produced and edited by WRKF's Aubry Procell. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Karen Henderson. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman and Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

When neo-Nazis came to New Orleans, a group of Holocaust survivors fought back

The Little Book of King Cake brings the story of the iconic carnival dessert to kids

In the last few years New Orleans has seen an explosion in the variety of King Cakes one can buy. From Dong Phuong's Vietnamese style of the desert, to Norma's Sweets Bakery's Cuban approach with a guava filling, King Cakes are increasingly taking on new cultural identities. Last weekend, Louisiana Considered's Alana Schreiber visited The Museum of the Southern Jewish Experience and spoke with New Orleanian and baker Serena Deutch, to learn about a new kind of King Cake with a Jewish spin. And while we're on the subject of King Cakes, just recently New Orleans author Matt Haines released a new book, The Little Book of King Cake. Back in 2021 he published the Big Book of King Cake, a coffee table book detailing the origin story behind this carnival dessert. He joins us for more on how his original book led to his new one for children. But first, it's been a busy week in politics, and that means it's time to catch up with The Times-Picayune | The Advocate's editorial director and columnist, Stephanie Grace. Today we discuss potential candidates for the Louisiana 2023 governor's race. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Patrick Madden. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman and Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Little Book of King Cake brings the story of the iconic carnival dessert to kids

Teens who were held at Angola's former death row facility seek to join lawsuit against Gov. Edwards

Following Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans became one of the most deforested cities in the country. Recently, the environmental group Sustaining Our Our Landscape (SOUL) released a new agenda to plant 100,000 trees in the city by 2040. The Coastal Desk's Halle Parker sat down with SOUL's executive director and founder Susannah Burley to learn more. Last year, the Louisiana Office of Juvenile Justice began transferring youth in detention to Angola, the state's most notorious prison. Now two teens, who had been held in a former death row building at the facility, are seeking to join an ongoing lawsuit against Governor Edwards over their treatment. Criminal Justice reporter for the The Times-Picayune | The Advocate James Finn tells us what might happen next. January 27th is Holocaust Remembrance Day, when we make the commitment to never forget one of the worst genocides in human history. Late holocaust survivor Irving Roth joined us three years ago to share his experience and stress the importance of civic responsibility. Today we will hear an encore of that conversation. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Karl Lengel. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman, Aubry Procell, and Thomas Walsh. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

Teens who were held at Angola's former death row facility seek to join lawsuit against Gov. Edwards

The Southern University Laboratory Virtual School is awarded for surmounting pandemic obstacles

The Southern University Laboratory Virtual School in Baton Rouge will be recognized next week by the State Department of Education for its progress and development despite extraordinary obstacles. During the ongoing pandemic, the school managed to go from an F rating to a C in just a few years. Nadia Seals, director of virtual school at Southern University Laboratory Virtual School, tells us about the institution's extraordinary progress. Today marks the beginning of Cinema on the Bayou, a Lafayette festival that will offer screenings of nearly 200 films over 8 days. As the second oldest juried international film festival in Louisiana, Cinema on the Bayou, will offer features and documentaries from around the world while also highlighting local films and filmmakers that celebrate Louisiana culture and history. Festival director Rebecca Hudsmith joins us for more. But first, Louisiana lawmakers are headed back to the capitol for a seven-day special session all about insurance. WRKF's Paul Braun tells us why officials plan to set aside $45 million for cash incentives to lure insurance companies back to the state Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Adam Vos. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman, Aubry Procell, and Thomas Walsh. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

The Southern University Laboratory Virtual School is awarded for surmounting pandemic obstacles

Big Freedia returns to TV with a new show about her business endeavors

Coming in the summer of 2023, New Orleans' own Big Freedia will bring us the brand-new series, Big Freedia Means Business. This new show documents the Queen of Bounce's new music and entrepreneurial endeavors that have occurred since her last docu-series, "Big Freedia Bounces Back." Big Freedia joins us for more on her musical journey and this exciting new series. Carol Bebelle, co-founder of Ashé Cultural Arts Center is embracing the second half of life with the release of her first collection of music. It's called Medicine Bag/A Prescription for Healing. She tells us more on finding her musical voice in retirement. But first, hospitals across the country are experiencing a severe healthcare staffing shortage that is impacting patient care and making it more difficult for emergency and ambulatory services to answer 911 calls. The Gulf States Newsroom healthcare reporter Shalina Chatlani climbed into an ambulance to see how emergency care has changed. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Diane Mack. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman and Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How the Bogalusa Heart Study has contributed to cardiovascular research over the last 50 years

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Bogalusa Heart Study. Started in 1973, this study looks at the impact of vascular and metabolic changes on health throughout the lifespan. And, it's one of the longest on-going health studies of a biracial, semi-rural southern community. Director of the Tulane Center for Lifespan Epidemiology Research, Dr. Lydia Bazzano tells us about the profound impact this study has had on various fields of research over the last half century. This weekend, the American Red Cross of Louisiana will head to Baton Rouge for a day of installing free smoke alarms. WWNO's Karl Lengel speaks with Ed Bush, Executive Director, Capital West Chapter in the Louisiana Region for the American Red Cross, to learn more about this event and hear how to mitigate fire risks. Late last year, the Environmental Protection Agency announced that 53 million dollars would go out to communities across the nation to monitor air pollution. One of those recipients is the Cherokee community in Pascagoula, Mississippi where community members there have been sounding the alarm for a decade. But as the Gulf States Newsroom's Danny McArthur reports, many are skeptical that the new testing will fix their problems. Today's episode of Louisiana Considered was hosted by Alana Schreiber. Our managing producer is Alana Schreiber and our digital editor is Katelyn Umholtz. Our engineers are Garrett Pittman and Aubry Procell. You can listen to Louisiana Considered Monday through Friday at 12:00 and 7:30 pm. It's available on Spotify, Google Play, and wherever you get your podcasts. Louisiana Considered wants to hear from you! Please fill out our pitch line to let us know what kinds of story ideas you have for our show. And while you're at it, fill out our listener survey! We want to keep bringing you the kinds of conversations you'd like to listen to. Louisiana Considered is made possible with support from our listeners. Thank you! See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information.

How the Bogalusa Heart Study has contributed to cardiovascular research over the last 50 years