All Things Considered Hear the All Things Considered program for October 17, 2018

Schoolchildren are led through a dance routine at a U.S. government-supported childcare center in Raqqa. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

World

In Syria, A School Helps Children Traumatized By War

"What we found is children had been so traumatized, they couldn't even recognize numbers or letters," says a U.S. official. "We had to work through that before we could start educating them again."

Schoolchildren are led through a dance routine at a U.S. government-supported childcare center in Raqqa. Greg Dixon/NPR hide caption

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Greg Dixon/NPR

In Syria, A School Helps Children Traumatized By War

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A new analysis of what were initially thought to be microbial fossils in Greenland suggests they might instead just be mineral structures created when ancient tectonic forces squeezed stone. While most of the structures point in one direction, the red arrow shows that some point in the other direction. Courtesy of Abigail Allwood hide caption

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Courtesy of Abigail Allwood

Geologists Question 'Evidence Of Ancient Life' In 3.7 Billion-Year-Old Rocks

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Mary Kathleen "Kathy" Tyler, an 82-year-old woman incarcerated at Iowa Correctional Institution for Women in Mitchellville, was sentenced to life in prison in 1978. She is an avid reader, artist and pianist; is employed as a court reporter; and has accumulated a handful of degrees since she was incarcerated. Jessica Earnshaw for NPR hide caption

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Jessica Earnshaw for NPR

In Iowa, A Commitment To Make Prison Work Better For Women

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Lance Erwin works with a neighbor in Mexico Beach, Fla., to repair parts of his roof after it was blown off by Hurricane Michael. Rules are looser in the Pandhandle, allowing construction that couldn't stand up to the storm's 155 mph winds. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Greg Allen/NPR

After Hurricane Michael, A Call For Stricter Building Codes In Florida's Panhandle

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Reynolds poses with White House press secretary Sarah Sanders at a harvest-themed fundraiser in Des Moines on Oct. 13. Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio hide caption

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Clay Masters/Iowa Public Radio

In Danger Of Losing, Iowa Governor Enlists Republican Heavy Hitters Ahead Of Midterms

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Cottonseed is full of protein but toxic to humans and most animals. The U.S. Department of Agriculture this week approved a genetically engineered cotton with edible seeds. They could eventually feed chickens, fish — or even people. Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University hide caption

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Courtesy of Lacey Roberts/Texas A&M University

Not Just For Cows Anymore: New Cottonseed Is Safe For People To Eat

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