All Things Considered for February 9, 2010 Hear the All Things Considered program for February 9, 2010

All Things Considered

Pakistani paramilitary troops patrol a tense area of Karachi in April 2009, after armed ethnic clashes between Pashtun and Urdu-speaking groups left at least 34 people dead in Pakistan's financial capital, Karachi. Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Asif Hassan/AFP/Getty Images

Pakistani City Becomes Suspected Taliban Hot Spot

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Hell Or High Water: The river Styx is guarded by Phlegyas, who ferries Virgil and Dante into the underworld. Electronic Arts hide caption

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Electronic Arts

Dante's 'Inferno' Makes A Hell Of A Video Game

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Lil Wayne arrives at New York State Supreme Court for weapons charges on Dec. 15, 2009. Andy Kropa/Getty Images hide caption

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Andy Kropa/Getty Images

Lil Wayne's Jail Time: All Part Of The Plan

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Construction workers convert Sunday school rooms into exam rooms at the New Orleans Faith Health Alliance, a fledgling health clinic for uninsured workers at First Grace United Methodist Church in New Orleans' Mid-City neighborhood. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

As Focus Shifts To Jobs, The Uninsured Seek Solutions

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"Honestly, I've mutated into all of these people," says author David Rose, when asked whether he gets tired of reading personal ads. Jonathan Player/Courtesy of Simon and Schuster Inc. hide caption

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Jonathan Player/Courtesy of Simon and Schuster Inc.

Creepy Or Clever, Ads Offer Adventures In Voyeurism

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