All Things Considered for March 11, 2010 Hear the All Things Considered program for March 11, 2010

All Things Considered

Afghan army commandos stand on a sand bank as a U.S. Army Apache helicopter flies above at sunset in Marjah's Balakino Bazar neighborhood on Feb. 24. Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrick Baz/AFP/Getty Images

Afghan Troops Earn Kudos, But Questions Remain

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Clarissa Martinez de Castro of the National Council of La Raza talks to reporters after meeting with President Obama to discuss comprehensive immigration reform. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Advocates Aim To Revive Immigration Overhaul

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When this poster was printed in 1900, mind reading was still in the realm of magic. A new computer program capable of predicting individuals recollections has brought telepathy a small step closer to science. Library of Congress hide caption

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Library of Congress

Computers One Step Closer To Reading Your Mind

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An employee cleans sections of a trumpet at Conn-Selmers' Vincent Bach division in Elkhart, Ind. The company produces a well-known brand of trumpets and trombones. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

New Music Emerges From Elkhart's Instrument Past

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In this 1969 photo, U.S. President Nixon welcomes Japanese Prime Minister Eisaku Sato at the White House when the two leaders were holding talks concerning the return of Okinawa to Japanese control. This week, a Japanese government-appointed panel confirmed the existence of secret U.S.-Japan agreements, including ones signed by Nixon and Sato in 1969 allowing nuclear weapons in Japan. AP hide caption

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AP

Japan Confirms Secret Nuclear Pacts With U.S.

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John Brown died before the Civil War, executed in 1859 after he tried to instigate a slave rebellion in the South. AP hide caption

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AP

Costs Threaten Upkeep Of John Brown's Burial Site

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