All Things Considered for April 29, 2010 Hear the All Things Considered program for April 29, 2010

All Things Considered

Palestinian laborers work on a new housing project at the Israeli settlement of Har Homa in East Jerusalem. Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ahmad Gharabli/AFP/Getty Images

Israel Slows Construction In East Jerusalem

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Muslim scholar Tariq Ramadan, pictured here at a conference in France on April 25, is now able to enter the U.S. He tells NPR that when he speaks in the U.S., he's too much of a Muslim and when he speaks in the Muslim world, he's too much of a Westerner. Jean Sebastien Evrard/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jean Sebastien Evrard/AFP/Getty Images

Formerly Banned Muslim Scholar Tours U.S.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers a keynote address at the Facebook developers conference in San Francisco on April 21. Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/Associated Press

Debate Continues Around Facebook Privacy Changes

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Jack White in the Third Man Records store Courtesy of Third Man Records hide caption

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Courtesy of Third Man Records

Jack White's Record Label: Old Sounds, New Tricks

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This illustration shows the asteroid 24 Themis flanked by two small fragments that broke off following a crash more than 1 billion years ago. The bottom fragment's cometlike tail comes from the sublimation of ice from its surface. Gabriel Perez, Servicio MultiMedia, Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain hide caption

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Gabriel Perez, Servicio MultiMedia, Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Tenerife, Spain

Frosty Asteroid May Give Clues About Earth's Oceans

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The 1919 Sanford Memorial at Saratoga was the only race the legendary thoroughbred Man O'War (No. 1) didn't finish first. He was beaten by the aptly named Upset (No. 4). AP hide caption

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AP

Cash Shortage Could Stall Horse Races At Saratoga

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