All Things Considered for July 27, 2010 Hear the All Things Considered program for July 27, 2010

All Things Considered

U.S. Navy and South Korean ships sail in a 13-ship formation led by the Los Angeles-class attack submarine USS Tucson on Monday in the East Sea off the Korean peninsula. North Korea has promised "sacred war" in response to the naval exercises, which began on Sunday. U.S Navy via Getty Images hide caption

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U.S Navy via Getty Images

U.S. Weighs Options In Possible N. Korea Conflict

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An activist from a nongovernmental organization participates in a demonstration June 25 in New Delhi against recent honor killings in the capital and other parts of the country. Manish Swarup/AP hide caption

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Manish Swarup/AP

India Struggles To Stem Rise In 'Honor Killings'

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Getting To Know You: In real life, we usually don't learn about the people who live through (and die in) natural disasters until after the disaster has unfolded. In movies like 2012, that chronology runs in reverse: Filmmakers introduce their characters (divorced dad John Cusack and daughter Morgan Lily, above), then put them through airborne escapes (below) and many other kinds of CGI hell. Columbia Pictures hide caption

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Columbia Pictures

Disasters In Reel Life: It's About Time (And Suspense)

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An Iraqi army officer talks to U.S. soldiers during an exchange of intelligence June 2 at an Iraqi army base near Al Guwair, south of Mosul, Iraq. Warrick Page/Getty Images hide caption

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Warrick Page/Getty Images

In Iraq, U.S. Sees Signs Of 'What Winning Looks Like'

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BP Chairman Carl-Henric Svanberg (right) stands with outgoing CEO Tony Hayward. Hayward may not receive any exit compensation if he stays on with the company. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Hayward's 'Golden Parachute' Is Relatively Modest

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos recently entered an exclusive agreement with the Wylie Agency to sell e-book versions of some of its pre-digital classics. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

In E-Publishing Revolution, Rights Battle Wears On

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Formerly a trial lawyer, Richard North Patterson served as the SEC liaison to the Watergate special prosecutor. He is now a best-selling thriller writer. Patterson writes his novels longhand from an outline and then faxes his notes to his assistant who types them up -- a system that has worked for him for nearly 30 years. Peter Simon hide caption

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Peter Simon

'Advise And Consent': Scandal In The U.S. Senate

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