All Things Considered for November 2, 2010 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 2, 2010

All Things Considered

At the Sonora Market in Mexico City, statues of Christian icons are displayed for sale next to Day of the Dead figures and narco-saints. Increasingly, Mexicans are turning to amulets and figurines amid the country's brutal drug war and languishing economy. Jason Beaubien/NPR hide caption

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Jason Beaubien/NPR

Mexicans Seek Charms, Potions To Ward Off Bad Luck

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A day after leaving Moscow, travelers can see colorful churches along the forested banks of the Volga. They share the banks with mansions of Russia's nouveau riche. Anne Garrels/NPR hide caption

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Anne Garrels/NPR

Navigating Tricky Crosscurrents In Russia's Heartland

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Mike Green texts now, but he didn't in 2005, when his now ex-wife began an affair with her colleague via text messaging. He hopes he can trust again; he gets suspicious whenever a girlfriend texts someone else. Courtesy of Mike Green hide caption

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Courtesy of Mike Green

Can Social Media Break Up A Marriage?

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Community leaders and homeowners who have lost their homes to foreclosure protest at a rally in Los Angeles last month. Bank of America has acknowledged finding some mistakes in its foreclosure files. Mark Ralston/AFP hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP

A Foreclosure Gone Wrong: One Man's Struggle

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Two orphans at Masigcine Children's Home, near Capetown, South Africa. Some researchers say that foreign volunteers working in children's homes may be harming those they are trying to help. Courtesy of Aviva hide caption

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Courtesy of Aviva

In S. Africa's Orphanages, Is Doing Good Really Bad?

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