All Things Considered for November 26, 2010 Hear the All Things Considered program for November 26, 2010

All Things Considered

Blake Mycoskie, 34, who calls himself the Chief Shoe Giver, created a business model that lets him give back. For one pair of Toms shoes purchased, the company gives one pair away -- from the Gulf Coast to Argentina to Ethiopia. Courtesy of Toms hide caption

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Courtesy of Toms

'Soul Mates': Shoe Entrepreneur Finds Love In Giving

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Dr. Barry Gordon, a neurologist and an experimental psychologist at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, has been trying to help his son Alex find language. Alex, pictured here at 7 years was always non-verbal and diagnosed as autistic at age 4. Courtesy of the Gordon Family hide caption

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Courtesy of the Gordon Family

A Scientist's Saga: Give Son The Gift Of Speech

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Saddam Hussein's luxury yacht, shown here in Greece in 2009, has gold-plated bathroom fixtures, a helipad and its own minisubmarine. Thanassis Stavrakis/AP hide caption

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Thanassis Stavrakis/AP

Saddam Hussein's Yacht Back In Iraq

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Eat Up: Eating a large meal at the holidays won't have a big impact on your weight, says one physiologist. That's because your brain keeps a close watch on food intake and can tolerate the occasional big meal. It's slow, steady weight gain that's more problematic. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com

Post-Feast Weight Gain Isn't As Bad As You Think

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The legacy of U.S. Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr., shown on April 20, 1972, is spelled out in more than 1,300 legal opinions. John Rous/AP hide caption

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John Rous/AP

Justice Brennan: A Liberal Icon Gets Another Look

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