All Things Considered for December 6, 2010 Hear the All Things Considered program for December 6, 2010

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Oakland, Calif., in the San Francisco Bay Area, has been dubbed by the FBI as a "high-intensity child prostitution area." Oakland officials say that a third of teenage girls working in prostitution there were abducted and forced onto the streets, and 61 percent of teen prostitutes say they were raped as children. Brett Myers /Youth Radio hide caption

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Brett Myers /Youth Radio

Trafficked Teen Girls Describe Life In 'The Game'

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Howard Jacobson is the author of several novels, including Who's Sorry Now and The Making of Henry. His latest novel, The Finkler Question, recently won the Booker Prize. Lefteris Pitarakis/AP hide caption

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Lefteris Pitarakis/AP

Howard Jacobson: Finding Humor In Jewish Nerves

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Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals Judge N. Randy Smith hears arguments Monday in San Francisco. Monday's hearing was just the latest twist in the long legal battle over California's ban on same-sex marriage. Eric Risberg/Pool, AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/Pool, AP

Expect More Legal Twists In Battle Over Prop. 8

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Soldiers from the Army's 101st Airborne Division walk along high mud walls in a village in Afghanistan's Kandahar province. The Obama administration later this month will release its annual review of the war strategy. Afghanistan's history does not offer encouragement. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

For Invaders, A Well-Worn Path Out Of Afghanistan

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Sierra Club activists wearing flags, representing more than 20 countries, take part in a protest by hiding their heads in the sand in Cancun last week. The group said countries participating in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in Cancun are not doing enough to stop climate change. AP hide caption

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AP

Beyond Cancun: What's The Future Of Climate Policy?

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Oysterman Mitch Jurisich steers a small boat around his family's oyster beds off the coast of Empire, La. He hasn't harvested many oysters since oil from the BP spill drifted into the area in June. Tamara Keith/NPR hide caption

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Tamara Keith/NPR

Oyster Businesses Still Plagued By Gulf Oil Spill

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Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner is among the subjects of U.S. diplomatic cables about Latin America leaked by WikiLeaks. Some of the cables speculated about the mental and physical health of regional leaders, such as Fernandez de Kirchner. Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Cortez/AFP/Getty Images

Leaked U.S. Cables Prompt Latin American Furor

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The owner of the Vieuxtemps Guarneri del Jesu says he hopes to sell the violin for $18 million -- easily affordable for billionaires, but not musicians. Courtesy of Bein & Fushi Inc. hide caption

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Courtesy of Bein & Fushi Inc.

Played By Violinists, Bought By Billionaires

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